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Publication numberUS3915880 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 28, 1975
Filing dateMar 23, 1973
Priority dateMar 23, 1973
Publication numberUS 3915880 A, US 3915880A, US-A-3915880, US3915880 A, US3915880A
InventorsSepulveda Gilberto
Original AssigneeSepulveda Gilberto
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pine oil-ammonia cleansing composition
US 3915880 A
Abstract
A cleansing composition comprises pine oil, ammonia, a bleaching agent and water. The composition is useful for removal of undesired markings from surfaces, especially for the removal of ink and paint graffiti from metal, concrete and ceramic surfaces. The composition may include detersive agents, abrasives and phosphate builders.
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United States Patent RU 169 x Sepulveda Oct. 28, 1975 PINE OIL-AMMONIA CLEANSING 3,001,947 9/1961 Slahler et a] 252/153 COMPOSITION 3,115,471 l2/l963 Matuska et al. 252/DIG. 8 3,350,317 l0/l967 Symes 252/106 lnventofl Gilbert" Sepulveda, 1126 Wllbw 3,703,472 11/1972 Shaw et a1. .1 252/153 A .,H bok ..070 N J 30 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS [22] 1973 263,661 1/1927 United Kingdom 252/154 [21] AppL 343,315 455,802 4/1949 Canada 252/119 I Primary Examiner-Benjamin R. Padgett [52] US. Cl. 252/99; 134/38, 252/102; Assistant Examiner christine Nucker 252/ 104; 252/112; 252/ I39; 252/l40; Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Ladas, Parry, Von Gehr, 252/153; 252/155; 252/541; 252/DlG. 8 Goldsmih & Deschamps [51] Int. CL... 3088 7/00;C11D 3/l2; Cl lD 7/54; Cl 1D 7/56 [58] Field of Search 252/99, 102, I04, I06, [57] I T 252 2 H3 5 116 119, 139, 140 153, A cleans ng composition comprlses pme o1l, am1:noma,

55 DIG- 8 DIG- 14 34/38 a bleachmg agent and water. The composition is useful for removal of undesired markings from surfaces, 5 References Cited especially for the removal of ink and paint graffiti UNITED STATES PATENTS frorn metal, ccncrete and ceramic surfaces. T he com- 158142 4/1926 B b 252,99 position may include deterslve agents, abraslves and ee e 1,724,289 3/1928 Lanham 252/l l2 phosphate blinders 2,345,776 4/1944 Soderberg 252/139 3 Claims, N0 Drawings PINE OIL-AMMONIA CLEANSING COMPOSITION BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention The present invention relates to a cleansing composition effective for removal of undesired markings from surfaces and to a method for removal of undesired markings, particularly ink and paint markings, from metal, concrete or ceramic surfaces. More particularly, the present invention relates to a cleansing composition comprising pine oil, ammonia, a bleaching agent and water.

2. Description of the Prior Art The removal of undesired markings, such as paint and ink, from various surfaces has been of interest for a long time. Such surfaces may have been inadvertently or intentionally marked, and the restoration of the original appearance may present considerable problems. Currently, there is great public interest in the removal of markings known as graffiti, which is a defacement, in the form of words or figures, of the walls and other surfaces of public places. Partly as a result of the great proliferation and availability of aerosol paint sprays and ink marking devices, it has proven to be quite difficult to avoid the defacement of public places by such graffiti.

Although many cleansing compositions and solvents are known in the prior art, most of such products have not been adapted to deal with the particular problems in the removal of graffiti. The removal of graffiti is difficult because the defacement is accomplished by means of a great variety of marking materials, many of which are inherently difficult to remove. Further, the mark ings are placed on a variety of surfaces, such as metals, concrete and ceramic surfaces. Some of these surfaces are porous, and the markings may penetrate the pores, making the problem of removal even more difficult. In addition, metals and other surfaces may have a coating or other finish which is defaced by the markings.

Cleansing compositions such as those disclosed in US. Pat. Nos. 3,108,078 and 3,406,] 16, are known to contain a bleaching agent, an abrasive and a detersive agent. Such scouring cleansers are effective in only limited situations, and are generally not effective particularly for the removal of paints and inks from porous surfaces, or where abrasive action would be detrimental to the finish of the surface to be cleaned. Similarly, commercial bleaching solutions have only a limited effectiveness on paint, and the use of strong solvents is limited by the necessity to use particular solvent systems for particular ink or paint formulations, as well as the hazards involved in the inhalation and danger of tire when using such solvents.

Accordingly, there is a great need for a cleansing composition which is effective for the removal of a wide variety of different markings on different surfaces, presents minimal hazards, and is economical.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In accordance with the present invention a cleansing composition which is effective against a wide variety of said undesired markings is provided, said composition comprising pine oil, ammonia, a bleaching agent and water.

In accordance with the method of the invention, such composition may be applied to a wide variety of surfaces containing graffiti, and the effective removal of the graffiti is accomplished by wiping or brushing.

The composition additionally may include detersive agents, abrasives and phosphate or other builders, depending on the requirements of the particular markings and surface.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS The components of the cleansing composition of the present invention may be present in varied amounts which may be adjusted to suit the nature of the markings to be removed, or the nature of the surface being cleaned. In general, the cleansing composition of the invention comprises, by weight, from about 10 to about 40 percent of pine oil, from about 0.5 to about 10 percent of Nl-l from about 0.1 to about 10 percent of a bleaching agent, and the balance being water.

A preferred composition according to the invention comprises, by weight, from about 20 to about 25 percent of pine oil, from about 0.8 to about 1.0 percent of NI-I from about 0.1 to about 1.0 percent of a bleaching agent, and the balance being water.

In some cases the addition of an abrasive detergent may increase the effectiveness of the composition, and it has been found effective to include in the composition of the invention one or more detersive agents, phosphate builders or abrasives. Where these are used, it is preferred to include per gallon of said composition, up to 2.5 pounds of a detergent comprising a detersive agent, a phosphate builder and an abrasive.

The pine oil component of the invention is a commercially available material obtained from pine wood by steam distillation or solvent extraction followed by steam distillation, and also by destructive distillation. It consists primarily of terpene alcohols, and may contain up to about 10 percent inert ingredients, primarily water.

The ammonia which is used in the composition may be obtained from any of the commercially available diluted or concentrated ammonia solutions, and conveniently a solution containing about 8 percent by weight NI-I may be used, in appropriate amounts to provide the desired effect.

The bleaching agent may be any of the commonly and commercially available substances such as oxalic acid, sodium hypochlorite, trichlorocyanuric acid, and the like. It has also been found effective to use bleaching agents derived from natural substances, such as lemon extracts.

When used, the detersive agent may be an inorganic or organic detergent as known in the art. A wide variety of abrasive agents may be employed, such as silica, diatomaceous earth and various clays.

Other additives commonly employed in detersive compositions may also be included for particular applications.

The following examples are for the purpose of illustrating the present invention, and it will be understood that the invention is not limited thereto.

EXAMPLE l A cleansing composition is prepared by combining:

25 percent by volume of pine oil 10 percent by volume of aqueous ammonia (l5% Baume) 2% pounds of commercial scouring powder (consisting of by weight 88.5 percent silica, 3.5 percent sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate, 7.0 percent inorganic salts and 1.0 percent trichlorocyanuric acid).

sufficient water-to make 1 gallon of the composition.

The above composition is found to be highly effective in the removal of paint and ink from a variety of surfaces.

EXAMPLE 2 The above composition is found to be effective for removal of a wide variety of graffiti from concrete and ceramic surfaces.

What is claimed is:

l. A cleansing composition effective for removal of undesired markings from surfaces, said composition comprising by weight, from about 10 to about 40 percent of pine oil, from about 0.5 to about 10 percent of NH from about 0.1 to about 10 percent of a bleaching agent, and the balance being water.

2. A cleansing composition according to claim 1, which comprises, by weight, from about 20 to about 25 percent of pine oil, from about 0.8 to about 1.0 percent of NH from about 0.1 to about 1.0 percent of a bleaching agent, and the balance being water.

3. A composition according to claim 2 which additionally includes a detersive agent, an abrasive and a phosphate builder.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1581421 *Dec 1, 1924Apr 20, 1926Jay ToddCleaner and paint remover
US1724289 *Mar 24, 1928Aug 13, 1929Lanham Ira WCleansing composition
US2345776 *May 1, 1941Apr 4, 1944Wyandotte Chemicals CorpSodium silicate detergent composition
US3001947 *Sep 30, 1957Sep 26, 1961Alvin StahlerAqueous ammonium hydroxide detergent composition
US3115471 *Aug 16, 1961Dec 24, 1963Koury Anthony JRemover for fluorescent and temporary camouflage paint systems
US3350317 *Sep 24, 1965Oct 31, 1967Monsanto CoSterilizing, disinfecting, oxidizing and bleaching composition
US3703472 *Jul 29, 1970Nov 21, 1972West Laboratories IncPine-ammonia detergent composition
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4329247 *Nov 6, 1980May 11, 1982Pdi, Inc.Stain remover for vinyl materials
US4353745 *Aug 26, 1981Oct 12, 1982Chemed CorporationCleaner for anti-graffiti system
US4461547 *Jun 23, 1983Jul 24, 1984Olympus Optical Company, Ltd.Lens hood with an eccentrically disposed light intercepting body for a camera
US4461652 *Sep 13, 1982Jul 24, 1984Richmond Therezia LBarnacle removal process and product
US4482469 *Sep 3, 1982Nov 13, 1984Ploetze BodoCleaning agent for fire-arm barrels
US4806274 *Jul 19, 1988Feb 21, 1989Robert H. CrouseScented cleaner for guns
US5098591 *Feb 5, 1990Mar 24, 1992Stevens Sciences Corp.Paint stripper and varnish remover compositions containing organoclay rheological additives, methods for making these compositions and methods for removing paint and other polymeric coatings from flexible and inflexible surfaces
US5124062 *Apr 22, 1991Jun 23, 1992Stevens Sciences Corp.Paint stripper and varnish remover compositions, methods for making these compositions and methods for removing paint and other polymeric coatings from flexible and inflexible surfaces
US5135743 *May 24, 1991Aug 4, 1992The Clorox CompanyCombined odor controlling animal litter
US5156760 *Jun 25, 1990Oct 20, 1992Marchemco, Inc.Surface cleaning compositions
US5167853 *Dec 31, 1991Dec 1, 1992Stevens Sciences, Corp.Paint stripper and varnish remover compositions containing organoclay rheological additives, methods for making these compositions and methods for removing paint and other polymeric coatings from flexible and inflexible surfaces
US5183655 *May 26, 1992Feb 2, 1993The Clorox CompanyCombined odor controlling animal litter
US5189987 *May 20, 1991Mar 2, 1993The Clorox CompanyOdor controlling animal litter with pine oil
US5393451 *May 17, 1994Feb 28, 1995Koetzle; A. RichardHigh temperature flashpoint, stable cleaning composition
US5433654 *Jun 1, 1993Jul 18, 1995Westinghouse Electric Corp.Pressurized ferrofluid paint removal system using an electromagnet and eddy current encircling coil to adjust weight percentage of magnetic particles
US5674826 *Jan 2, 1996Oct 7, 1997Mcmullen; Robert W.Cleaning composition
US5691289 *Nov 17, 1994Nov 25, 1997Kay Chemical CompanyCleaning compositions and methods of using the same
US5712234 *Mar 7, 1996Jan 27, 1998Arco Chemical Technology, L.P.Graffiti removers which comprise a dye bleaching agent
US6071867 *Aug 18, 1997Jun 6, 2000Kay Chemical CompanyCleaning compositions and methods of using the same
US6184192Apr 24, 1997Feb 6, 2001S. C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Chlorinated in-tank toilet cleansing block
EP0467618A1 *Jul 15, 1991Jan 22, 1992The Clorox CompanyNovel broad spectrum antimicrobial system for hard surface cleaners
WO1991000893A2 *Jun 29, 1990Jan 24, 1991Stevens Sciences Corp.Paint stripper and varnish remover compositions and related methods
WO1991000893A3 *Jun 29, 1990Feb 21, 1991Stevens Sciences CorpPaint stripper and varnish remover compositions and related methods
Classifications
U.S. Classification510/369, 510/174, 510/108, 510/463, 510/420, 134/38, 510/370, 510/206, 510/434
International ClassificationC11D3/43, C11D3/395, C11D7/06, C11D7/02, C11D3/16
Cooperative ClassificationC11D3/43, C11D7/06, C11D3/16, C11D3/395
European ClassificationC11D7/06, C11D3/395, C11D3/16, C11D3/43