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Publication numberUS3916922 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 4, 1975
Filing dateJun 14, 1974
Priority dateJun 20, 1973
Publication numberUS 3916922 A, US 3916922A, US-A-3916922, US3916922 A, US3916922A
InventorsPrumm Georg J
Original AssigneePrumm Georg J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electronic coin tester
US 3916922 A
Abstract
An electronic coin tester or coin checking device comprising a controllable correct/incorrect switch arrangement for receiving or returning coins and arranged at a discharge end of a measuring channel, and one or a number of controllable follower switches arranged below the aforesaid switch arrangement at the coin track or path of travel for the accepted proper coins, said follower switch serving for sorting the correct or good coins in coin type-related outlet channels.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 91 Priimm [451 Nov. 4, 1975 ELECTRONIC COIN TESTER [76] Inventor: Georg J. Priimm, Kolner Strasse 235, 5275 Bergneustadt, Germany [22] Filed: June 14, 1974 [21] Appl. No: 479,409

[30] Foreign Application Priority Data June 20, 1973 Germany 2332362 June 20, 1973 Germany 2332361 [52] US. Cl 133/3 R; 194/1 C; 209/74 [51] Int. CI. G07D 3/14 [58] Field of Search 133/3; 194/1 C, l D, 1 K,

l94/DIG. 15, 100 A; 209/74 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 4/1937 Jonneret 194/1 D 4/1942 Friend 194/1 D 3,199,517 8/1965 Wheelbarger 133/3 R 3,599,771 8/1971 Hinterstocker 194/100 A 3,640,367 2/1972 Noetinger 209/74 R Primary Examiner-Robert B. Reeves Assistant Examiner.Thomas E. Kocovsky Attorney, Agent, or FirmWerner W. Kleeman [57] ABSTRACT An electronic coin tester or coin checking device comprising a controllable correct/incorrect switch arrangement for receiving or returning coins and arranged at a discharge end of a measuring channel, and one or a number of controllable follower switches arranged below the aforesaid switch arrangement at the coin track or path of travel for the accepted proper coins, said follower switch serving for sorting the correct or good coins in coin type-related outlet channels.

10 Claims, 13 Drawing Figures Sheet 1 of 4 US. Patent Nov. 4, 1975 US. Patent No v. 4, 1975 Sheet 2 of4 3,916,922

ELECTRONIC COIN TESTER BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to electronic coin testers or coin checking devices of the type incorporating two or more outlet or discharge openings for the accepted proper or correct coins.

The heretofore known electronic coin testers only possess a controlled two-way switch, so that incorrect or improper coins are returned and all good or proper coins irrespective of their different types or classifications are accepted through a single outlet or drop opening.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is a primary object of the present invention to provide an improved construction of electronic coin checking device equipped with controllable switches which divert the accepted good or proper coins into different chutes.

Another important object of this invention aims at ensuring for the faultless functioning of such multi-path sorting devices and providing a construction enabling sorting of coins into different tracks or paths with very few means arranged in a space saving arrangement and with the greatest possible speed.

The hereinafter disclosed constructions and circuit arrangements can relate to electrical and electronic coin checking devices of every type without regard to any given employed measuring technique. The most extensively known coin testers possess a two-way switch for sorting the coins into so-called proper or correct coins and improper or incorrect coins. Such coin testers can be constructed in the most different ways. The proposals of the invention are related to socalled follower switches intended to be arranged be neath a two-way switch and the function of which much be accommodated to that of the two-way switch.

However, it is specifically mentioned that the hereinafter described constructions also can be employed as two-way or three-way switches beneath a measuring device for coins without there being employed one of the known two-way switches. The concepts of the invention therefore are also applicable for such type coin checking devices or coin testers.

According to the invention there is proposed for the first time to ensure for the faultless functioning of a sorting system (which as a rule consists of a proper/improper switch and one or more subsequently arranged follower switches) constructed of two or more sorting switches that the follower switches are likewise constructed to be controllable, for instance in the manner that they can be moved by the force of an electromagnet against the force of a restoring spring, and wherein the follower switches are energized for a longer time period than the proper/improper switch.

The actuation time for the follower switches must be calculated so that it is long enough that a coin to be sorted in any case has sufficient time to reach the desired outlet channel. On the other hand, the actuation of the proper/improper switch should only be maintained for the shortest possible time, namely, only for that length of time until the coin has entered into the receiving or acceptance channel for good coins and the proper/improper switch should again close directly behind the accepted good coin.

Both the proper/improper switch as well as the follower switch can be controlled via a timing element as well as by switches. This will be discussed more fully hereinafter.

Due to the proposals of the invention there is ensured that a further coin which follows a good or proper coin will not arrive together therewith into the sorting system and block such. The proposals of the invention therefore obtain a defined timewise separation of the acceptance of the coins and bring about an acceptance cycle which is independent of the sequence of inserting the coins.

A further aspect of the invention assists this objective in that according to the invention the measuringand evaluation circuit of the coin checking device is constructed such that after accepting a proper coin it remains blocked for the acceptance of any further coins for such length of time until the follower switch and in the case of a number of follower switches the slowesthas again reset. According to this proposal of the invention a coin directly following each good coin is rejected, irrespective of whether it is a proper or improper coin. In this way it is possible, depending upon requirements, to provide sufficient long time intervals between the acceptance of two coins, completely accommodating the requirements of the sorting system. There are overcome the heretofore known drawbacks which exist with the state-of-the-art coin testers by virtue of counterfeit money or the too rapid insertion of the coins and which can lead to blocking of the sorting system.

A further aspect of the invention aims at initially guiding the coins to be sorted in a drop or fall line and then preferably alternately diverting such coins laterally towards the left and towards the right ie to one side or the other. In this way there is achieved in toto for many coin typesa considerably lower structural height of the Sorting system than otherwise possible if the coins are only diverted to one side.

The constructional height which is available is limited and it not possible to classify or sort a random large number of coin types in the manner to be described hereinafter. According to a further facit of the invention it is particularly advantageous to guide two respective coin types into a common outlet channel and to additionally provide within or below the same a two-way or two-path sorting, for instance by means of a sorting flap subdividing such coin path and doubling the sorting possibilities.

It is of particular advantage if, according to a further aspect of the invention, all of the outlet channels (of which each are only individual ones 'guide two coin types) are arranged in alignment and doubling of the sorting possibility is attained by a single two/way switch actuated by only a single magnet.

All electronic coin checkers tap-off coin typerelated pulses from the measuring circuit for the control of the vending machine or the like. To this end there is generally provided a logical coupling circuit. A further proposal of the invention relates to employing the existing logic circuitry partially for the appropriate control of the proper/improper switch and the follower switches.

According to the invention this control of the switches can occur in accordance with a fixed or variable program. The latter is then of advantage if there are arranged beneath the outlet openings for the individual coin types automatically filling stacking tubes for the change i.e. the money which is given back as change. Overflowing of such stacking tubes is prevented with the heretofore known coin devices by mechanical means which occupy a certain structural height and therefore lead to a certain loss in stacking height. According to the invention it is possible to achieve a greater supply of the change money for the same height of the device in that the degree of filling of the stacking tubes is interrogated by suitable switches and such are switched in a manner that they act upon the sorting logic and for the duration of their actuation conduct incoming coins of the relevant type or classification to another outlet opening. It is possible, for instance, to allow one of the sorting channels to directly open into a coin cashbox and to direct the overflow from all other coin channels likewise directly into the cashbox.

The basic concepts of the invention can be employed in conjunction with the most different mechanical sorting structures. There will be discussed hereinafter only two particularly advantageous constructions in detail and further comments regarding the invention will also be discussed hereinafter.

The initially described system in principle consists of a fork-type sorting element which is displacably arranged transversely with respect to the direction of movement of the coins. The second system describes a three-way switch formed of two movable flaps.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS The invention will be better understood and objects other than those set forth above, will become apparent when consideration is given to the following detailed description thereof. Such description makes reference to the annexed drawings wherein:

FIGS. 1 to schematically illustrate a first type of sorting system, and wherein,

FIG. 1 schematically shows the drop channel for the coins;

FIG. 2 illustrates a further embodiment of the sorting system of the first exemplary embodiment having a space-saving construction;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a sorting element wherein for clarification the plates have only been shown in the form of channels;

FIG. 4 illustrates a view looking in the direction of the arrow IV of FIG. 3 of the arrangement thereof,

FIG. 5 illustrates a view of the arrangement of FIG. 3 looking in the direction of the arrow V;

FIGS. 6 to 9 illustrate a second embodiment of sorting system; and wherein FIGS. 6a, 6b and 6c schematically illustrate the basic position of both flaps relative to one another and both of the additionally attainable working positions respectively;

FIGS. 7a, 7b and 7c illustrate the three positions which are attained upon viewing the system from above and likewise shown schematically;

FIG. 8 shows in the same view the particularly advantageous arrangement of flexed or bent flaps at the flap armatures of magnets which are secured at the outside of the device; and

FIG. 9 illustrates a complete sorting system according to the invention arranged at a coin checker or tester with the aforementioned circuitry and illustrated in a functional diagramatic schematic showing.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Describing now the drawings, in FIG. 1 reference numeral 1 designates a drop or fall channel for coins and its lower end has been designated by reference character 2. The sorting channels which laterally branch-off of the drop channel 1 have been designated by reference numerals 3, 4 and 5. Additionally, it is to be understood that reference numerals 30, 40 and 50 designate fork-like or bifurcated sorting elements or switches. In the illustrated position all of the sorting elements 30, 40 and 50 are shown in their rest position. Their legs, 31, 41 and 51 block the inlets to the branched-off sorting channels 3, 4 and 5. The legs 32, 42 and 52 are located in recesses 33, 43 and 53 respectively, of the coin tester plate, so that a certain coin type or sort can drop unhindered in free fall downwardly into the channel 2. Other types of coins can be very simply conducted into the other outlet by controlling one of the sorting elements. In order to sort a coin in the channel 4 the switch 40 must be controlled, the leg 42 of which can now close the channel 1 towards the bottom. At the same time the leg 41 moves out of the blocking position likewise towards the front and into a not particularly illustrated recessed portion of the front boundary wall for all of the coin channels. A coin which drops downwardly through the channel 1 is thus guided by the leg 42 into the channel 4.

In FIG. 2 there is illustrated a particularly advantageous constructional embodiment having a space-saving structural height. According to a proposal of the invention the coins are alternately laterally diverted i.e. towards the right and towards the left of the main drop or fall channel 1 which continues into the branched portion 10. The corresponding outlets or discharges are designated by reference numerals 20, 30, 40 and 50. The sorting elements have been designated by reference numerals 60, 70, and and are actuated by not here particularly illustrated magnets against the force of a restoring spring or the like, as will be again considered more fully hereinafter. The legs 61, 71, 81 and 91 of the sorting elements, when in their basic position, block the lateral branched portions of the drop channel 1, so that a coin can be conducted into the outlet or discharge 10.

The legs 62 and 82 of the sorting elements are located in recesses 63 and 83 of the coin tester plate 12, the legs 72 and 92 in corresponding recesses of the not particularly illustrated front boundary plate for all sorting channels. According to a proposal of the invention the sorting elements 60/70 and 80/90 which are arranged at the same elevation are adjusted in opposition to one another, in other words, for instance element 60 by means of a thrust magnet and element 70 by means of a pulling or traction magnet. In this way it is possible to prevent the legs 62 and 72 from mutually hindering one another and the structural height of the system can be optimumly utilized. Further, it is believed that the function of the system will be readily apparent from the foregoing disclosure.

In FIG. 3 there is illustrated in perspective view a sorting element, and wherein for purposes of clarity the plates and 111 have simply been portrayed as channels.

FIG. 4 illustrates a sorting element viewed in the direction of the arrow IV of FIG. 3, and FIG. 5 illustrates a view of the sorting element looking in the direction of the arrow V of FIG. 3.

'In particular, FIGS. 3, 4 and 5 show an attachment plate 101 with a guide slot 102, a magnet 103 and its armature 104. At a bracket 105 there is mounted a return or restoring spring 106. The bracket 105 guided in the guide slot 102 secures the magnet armature 104 against rotation.

The front end of the magnet annature 104 has been designated by reference number 107, and the sorting legs mounted thereat by reference characters 108 and 109. The drop channel 1 formed by the plates 1 and 11 1 for the coins is freed by the sorting legs in the one position towards the left downwardly and in the other position towards the right downwardly. The lateral movement of such sorting legs is rendered possible in that the plates 110 and 111 possess appropriate throughpassages or openings 112 and 113, through which there can be shifted the laterally movable legs.

At this point there will now be generally considered the second exemplary embodiment of sorting system. According to the invention two movable flaps are arranged such that their spacing from one another with vertical position is greater than the inner dimensions of a superimposed arranged outlet or drop opening for coins or a measuring channel or the like. In this position of the flaps a coin can drop down therebetween. If done of both flaps are retained in such position and the other flap obliquely positioned, so that it contacts the vertical arranged flap, then a coin which drops from above can slide over the obliquely or inclined positioned flap in a laterally downwardly directed direction.

It is possible to position at an inclination the one or the other flap, so that in toto there are provided three sorting paths, namely a vertically downwardly directed sorting path, a second sorting path which is directed downwardly towards the left and a third sorting path which is directed downwardly towards the right.

According to the invention both of the flaps are preferably arranged such that their horizontal pivot axes or shafts extend at their lower portion or in alignment with their lower edges. This arrangement as contemplated by the invention affords a large number of advantages. A primary advantageresides in the fact that it is possible to mount the flaps in their rotary bearings so as to be easily accessible and therefore there are only required small adjustment forces, smaller than would be the case for a horizontal displacement. The rriost advantageous constructional arrangement can be realized according to a further proposal of the invention in that the sorting flaps are fixedly connected with the flap armature of a flap armature magnet, so that they practically only constitute the lateral extension of one such flap armature and at their free end there is only required an additional mounting. In conjunction with a return spring such flap armature construction affords particularly rapid actuation times for the sorting flaps.

A further very important advantage of the invention resides in the fact that the height of the sorting flaps and thus the constructional height of the entire sorting switch can be maintained very small because it is not dependent upon the diameter of the largest coins which are to be sorted, rather upon the closing angle of the flap armature and the transition angle from the inclined position into the vertical position.

The inventive aspect that the flaps pivot about their lower edge brings with it a further advantage. With this construction the control time for the flaps can be maintained particularly brief because it is only necessary that at the point in time of the arrival of a coin at the height of their upper edges such must be located in the desired sorting position. Directly thereafter, when the lower edge of the coin has been deflected into a predetermined direction, and the coin body in the main axis is still located above the flap upper edge, the control of the flaps can already be terminated. Their return into the starting position coincides with the further downward movement of the coins and finally is determined thereby. The restoring force for the flaps is dimensioned so weakly that an extremely early termination of the control can not lead to a binding or clamping of the coin between the upper edges of the flaps and such owing to its weight will drop down in any event. Directly behind the dropping coin the sorting flap again switches or flips back into its starting position and is in such position already when the coin with its upper edge is located only slightly below the upper edge of the sorting flap. A second 'coin which approximately follows the first coin is already again deflected in another direction. According to the system of this development there can be attained a sorting speed which exceeds that of any other system.

Further concepts of the invention relate to the lateral bounding or limiting of the drop path of the coins, and specifically in each of the three conceivable directions. With particular advantage the intermediate sorting path is arranged to lead vertically downwardly (although this is not absolutely necessary), so that one of three coin types can move along a vertical drop or fall line without hitting against the flaps. In practice, however, a lateral delimiting or bounding of such sorting path will be necessary, especially for ensuring for proper functioning even with an inclination of the entire device to all sides. According to a further aspect of the invention each flap member at the inside, to the right and left of the sorting path, can have associated therewith a respective web which extends in a flattened condition towards the upper edge, the wedge-shaped configuration of which depends upon the position of both flap members with respect to one another. Both of the webs of each flap are laterally offset with respect to those of the other flap, so that with a parallel positioning of both flaps there is provided by virtue of both wedges essentially a bounding or limitation of the intermediate space towards the sides. However, at the upper portion of the chute there remains to each side a small wedge-shaped section which is not covered.

With particular advantage it is therefore desirable according to the invention to dimension the webs serving as the lateral boundary so as to have such a height that their height is greater than the inner spacing of both flaps. This requires appropriate throughpassages or openings in the oppositely situated flaps. Advantageously each flap is equipped with only one web and one throughpassage or opening for the web of the other This construction ensures that independent of the possible angular positions of the flaps to one another there is always limited completely all around the drop chute for the coins which extends therebetween. The previously discussed flaps extend as closely as possible at right angles to the pivot axis of the flaps, in other words approximately in the drop or fall direction of the coins.

Both of the other resultant sorting paths for the coins, in each instance via an inclined positioned outer side of a flap, can extend in an offset manner towards one side adjacent the central sorting path. In this case there is also provided at the outside of the flaps suitable vertically downwardly extending webs or even closed chutes.

Generally, the sorting or classification of the coins is however required along different drop paths in order to fill stacking tubes for change coins or the like which are arranged beneath the coin tester, and which stacking tubes possess a mutual lateral spacing from one another. Therefore the outer sorting path must not extend vertically downwardly past the outside of the inclined positioned sorting flap, rather laterally towards the bottom. In this regard it is to be observed that such lateral downwardly extending sorting path for a coin is not hindered by a web which can piercingly extend through the recess provided therefor as an extension of the other flap and can hinder the travel of the coin. The external laterally downwardly extending sorting path therefore must extend away in each instance on that side of an imaginary vertical at which there is not arranged the described recess of the flap.

Having now had the benefit of the foregoing description concerning the basic construction of the flaps for this embodiment, there will now be considered in detail an exemplary embodiment of the invention of particularly advantageous construction and there will also be made certain further observations concerning specific concepts of the invention.

Referring therefore specifically to FIG. 6 there will be recognized that the drop opening or channel has been again designated by reference numeral 1, this drop opening 1 being arranged behind guide channels following a sorting switch, these guide channels serving for guiding the coins and being designated by reference characters 2, 3 and 4. Partition walls between the two channels are designated by reference numerals 200 and 300, the movable flaps arranged thereabove by reference characters 11 and 12, and their pivot axes or shafts by reference characters 13 and 14.

FIG. 6a illustrates the basic position of the system: flap 11 is vertically arranged, flap 12 is positioned so as to be inclined and leans against flap 11. This basic position is brought about by not particularly illustrated springs or the like. A coin dropping out of the opening 1 is guided in the guide channel 2.

FIG. 6b shows the position in which the coins drop into the guide channel 3. In so doing, the flap 12 must be moved by a here not particularly illustrated magnet against the force of a spring into a vertical working position. If both magnets are energized then also the flap 11 moves out of its vertical basic position into an inclined working position (FIG. 60) and a coin is delivered to the guide path 4.

It is thus apparent that with both of the sorting flaps there can be attained a total of three sorting paths or tracks.

FIG. 7 illustrates a plan view the same situation wherein the reference characters employed therein have been conveniently used to designate the same components as shown in FIG. 6. However, in this case it is assumed that the coins are not only intended to be sorted or classified in three parallel adjacently arranged chutes, rather that the three chutes must possess a lateral spacing relative to one another.

Therefore at the outside of the flap 11 there is arranged so as to extend vertically a web 15 which continues at itslower portion in an inclined floor 16; laterally there is mounted a wall 17 which is supported by a boundary web 18. In this way there is formed a chute which deviates downwardly at an inclination the coins and the guide track or path 4 provides a double lateral offset to the drop or discharge 19. It is apparent that the lateral direction (from 4 to 19) is predetermined since in the opposite direction the dropping out of the coins is prevented by the web 20 of the flap 21. Guide track or path 4/19 is only then in use, as has been shown, when both magnets are energized (FIG. In the basic position of both of the flaps 11 and 12, on the other hand the guide path 2/22 is in use (FIG. 7a). If only the flap 12 has been switched then the free fall between both of the flaps in other words the guide path 3- is free (FIG. 719). Both of the sorting flaps and the webs 23 and 20 secured thereto form a completely enclosed chute. The webs 23 and 20 can be higher than the inner spacing of the sorting flaps to one another because the recesses 24 and 25 are provided.

In FIG. 8 the frame or housing of the device has been designated by reference numeral 1000, at the inside of which there are arranged in offset relationship at the same elevation but laterally through the lateral spacing of the pivot axes 21 and 31, the magnets which have been designated by reference numerals 1020 and 1030. It is apparent that extensively independent of the position of the drop opening 1 and the thereunder starting guide path 2 the spacing of the side walls 1001 and 1002 can be maintained as small as possible, and only is dependent upon the length of the actuation magnets in addition to the free space for the movement of the flap armature. The stepped or flexed arrangement of the flaps l1 and 12 in their lengthwise direction permits of a particularly compact construction of coin tester, having great practical significance. The installation space for coin testers is prescribed by previously employed mechanical constructions within automatic vending machines and must be maintained in the interest of providing the desirable exchangability. In FIG. 8 there is shown the basic position of both flap members or flaps, wherein in this case both of the flap armature magnets are not energized. Consequently, the guide path 2/22 is located below the broken line shown drop opening 1 in preparatory position.

As is the case for any sorting switch the described sorting switches according to this invention in each case naturally can only process one coin. Accordingly to the invention it is necessary to thus ensure that a further coin will first then arrive in the proper/improper or correct/incorrect switch when the leading coin has positively departed from the sorting system of one or a number of follower switches.

FIG. 9 illustrates the cooperation between a complete sorting system of the invention and the coin tester and the measuringand evaluation circuit of the coin tester.

Coins dropping out of the measuring channel 1 which have not been classified as proper or correct coins by the measuring probe 26 and the acceptance of which therefore is not brought about by the measuringand evaluation circuit or which are not accepted by the measuringand evaluation circuit notwithstanding good measurement results of the probe 26 because the sorting arrangement of the invention has not yet completed the sorting of a leading coin (in this case because upon switching-in one of the magnets 27, 210, 220 or 400 a blocking circuit 142 is energized via the line 141) drop via the inclined positioned flap 28 of a proper/improper switch into the return chute 29 which is bounded by the walls 30 and 31 and open into the discharge or outlet 100. When none of the magnets 27, 210, 220, and 400 is energized any longer by a leading coin and the measuring probe 26 delivers a positive measurement result, then, the sorting flap 28 is controlled by the magnet 27 and briefly pivotably moves about its shaft or pivot axis 30 into the broken line position 31. An accepted proper coin is thus deflected into the system of the fanned-out six receiving or accep tance channels 310/311/321/330/331. Depending upon the coin type simultaneous with the sorting flap 28, if desired, there is also controlled one or a number of the other sorting flaps 32, 33, 41, 42 or 43, depending upon into which chute the corresponding coin is to be deflected. ln the illustrated embodiment only the flap 33 has been activated after the flap 28 which has already again dropped back and therefore the drop path 35/321 for the coin 143 is opened. A further coin 144, notwithstanding a good measurement result at the probe 26, is not accepted because the magnet 220 is energized, and accordingly via the line 141 the blocking circuit 142 prevents the acceptance of any further coins until the leading coin has been positively accepted. Consequently, coin 144 is guided into the return opening 100 and can not hinder the proper course of the sorting operation for the coin 143.

The wiper-like control of the soft magnet 27 occurs by means of a timing element 300. However, instead of such, according toa further concept of the invention, this could also occur in that the acceptance signal concerning a proper or good coin controls the switch and a switch element arranged at the region of the switch terminates such control upon the arrival of a coin.

The flaps 32 and 33 are controllable individually or in combination via their actuation magnets 210 and 220, so that, as has already been described in detail, three sorting paths 34, 35 and 36 are provided. The flaps 41, 42 and 43 should be positively connected with one another and thus can be conjointly actuated by a single magnet 400, so that the sorting possibility is now doubled from three to six.

It was previously already mentioned that the flap 28 is energized for as briefly as possible, however the actuation time of the follower switches much be longer. Each of the magnets for the follower switches therefore has a time-determining switching stage, the time of which is longer than the wiper time of the timing stage 300 or each of the magnets for the follower switches has associated therewith a bistable switching element 211, 221, 401 which assumes the switching-in operation on the basis of a signal and terminates such first then when a further resetting pulse should eliminate the switched position. This embodiment of the inventive concept has been illustrated in FIG. 9. The resetting of the bistable switching stages occurs by means of a light beam or photoelectric switch 201/202, which monitors all of the three chutes 34, 35 and 36 and delivers a pulse whenever a coin and as long as such coin interrupts the bundle of light rays. Upon termination of the beam interruption, in other words at the end of the signal, a circuit 204 delivers a restoring pulse to the bistable switching stages 211, 221 and 401. This restoring pulse occurs therefore first at the point time at which a coin has travelled into one of the chutes 310/311,

10 320/321 or 330/331. The same restoring pulse is also delivered to the blocking stage 142 which is associated with a timing stage having a longer time-constant, which upon arrival of a signal is started through the agency of the conductor or line 141 and upon the arrival of a signal from the circuit 204 is stopped.

The aforementioned light beam switch consists of a transmitter 202 at the intermediate wall 31 and a receiver 201 at the outer wall 37 of'the sorting device.

The measuringand evaluation circuit of the coin tester contains a logical coupling circuit which as a function of the nature of the measuring signal for the recognized and accepted proper coins externally delivers via one of the conductors 601 to 606 a respective counting pulse.

The sorting magnet 27 is arranged via the timing stage 300 at each of the six pulse conductors or lines, so that in each instance there occurs a control as soon as a counting signal is delivered through the agency of one of the six lines or conductors.

The sorting magnet 220 is located only at four of the six pulse lines or conductors, so that it cannot be energized when counting pulses are delivered via the conductors 601 or 602. In such instance the flap 33 is not energized and the relevant coins arrive at the chute 36. In order that one can arrive at the outlet 331 and the other at the outlet 330 the sorting magnet 400 is connected with one of these two pulse lines 601 or 602, in the illustrated example with the pulse line or conductor 602.

The pulse conductors or lines 603 and 604 service a sorting magnet 220 and open the chute 35. Again one of both pulse lines is also branched-off at the sorting magnet 400, so that with an output counting signal via the conductor 604 such can actuate the flap 42 and conduct the coin into the outlet 320, whereas a signal via the pulse conductor 603 leads to a sorting of the coins at the outlet 321. i i Y An outlet counting pulse via the line 605 energizes magnets 210 and 220, so that a corresponding coin can arrive in the outlet 311, an output counting pulse via the line 606 energizes the magnets 210, 220 and 400, so that a coin can be conducted into the outlet 310. It is of particular advantage if the logical control of the employed magnet is carried out in the manner that there is used logic circuitry which is present anyway for the circuitry 140 or such is used in part.

A further proposal of the invention relates to the provision of apparatuses which in a logical control for the sorting magnets are capable of cominginto play as a function of the output counting signal. In the illustrated exemplary embodiment there is shown an arrangement wherein a stacking tube 320 for coins is located beneath the outlet or drop opening 310, and which tube when filled closes a work contact 321 and therefore energizes a relay 322. The infeed conductors for the magnets 210, 220 and 400 are lead via interrupter contacts 323, 324 and 325 to the relay 322 and are interrupted upon energization of the relay. Consequently, a cointype which is intended for the stacking tube 320 -as long as switch 321 is closed and reportsthat such coin 1 1 may be otherwise variously embodied and practiced within the scope of the following claims. Accordingly,

What is claimed is:

1. An electronic coin checking device, comprising a measuring channel having an outlet, a controllable coin proper/improper switch means for the reception or return of coins arranged at the outlet of said measuring channel, means defining a coin path of travel for the accepted coins, and at least one controllable follower switch means for sorting the proper coins in typerelated outlet channels arranged beneath said proper- /improper switch means in the coin path of travel for the accepted proper coins, and measuringand evaluation circuit means including means for controlling the proper/improper switch means for a shorter period of time than the follower switch means.

2. The coin checking device as defined in claim 1, wherein the measuringand evaluation circuit means of the coin checking device after the recognition of a proper coin includes means which maintains said circuit means blocked at least for the duration of the actuation time of the follower switch means for the reception of further coins.

3. The coin checking device as defined in claim 2, including a timing circuit for determining the actuation duration of the follower switch means, the time of said timing circuit being determined by the longest resulting throughfall time for a coin through the switch means and during the thus determined minimum actuation time for the follower switch means there is blocked the delivery coins into the sorting device.

4. The coin checking device as defined in claim 2, further including means for initiating the actuation of the follower switch means by a signal, and by means of said signal there is terminated a switch element arranged at the region of drop out openings, and wherein the actuation time resulting as a function of the throughfall time of the coin for the follower switch means prevents the delivery of further coins into the sorting device.

5. An electronic coin checking device, comprising a measuring channel having an outlet, a controllable coin proper/improper switch means for the reception or return of coins arranged at the outlet of said measuring channel, means defining a coin path of travel for the accepted coins, a plurality of controllable follower switch means for sorting the proper coins in type-related outlet channels arranged beneath said proper/improper switch means in the coin path of travel for the accepted proper coins, each of said follower switch means is provided with a fork-like sorting element arranged to be displaceable transversely with respect to the direction of travel of the coins, said fork-like sorting element having a pair of legs, which legs in one of two possible positions frees a downwardly directed branched portion of the coin channel in one direction and blocks such in another direction, said follower switch means alternately laterally deviating out of a fall line the coins, and wherein said plurality of follower switch means embody two neighbouring follower switch means, one of said follower switch means being actuated by a traction magnet the other by a thrust magnet against the force of restoring springs.

6. An electronic coin checking device, comprising a measuring channel having an outlet, a controllable coin proper/improper switch means for the reception or return of coins arranged at the outlet of said measuring channel, means defining a coin path of travel for the accepted coins, and at least one controllable follower switch means for sorting the proper coins in typerelated outlet channels arranged beneath said proper- Iimproper switch means in the coin path of travel for the accepted proper coins, said follower switch means comprises a three-way switch constructed from two movable flaps, wherein both flaps with parallel positioning thereof relative to one another form a chute defined by mutual spacing therebetween, said chute extending in an alignment direction with an outlet opening located thereabove, the lateral boundary of said chute formed by both flaps is defined by protruding webs arranged approximately at right angles to substantially horizontal pivot means of the flaps at the inside thereof, and each flap possesses at least one such web, one boundary web of the one fiap defines one lateral boundary of the chute and the web of the other flap the other boundary of the chute, the height of the webs is greater than the spacing of both flaps and each flap is provided with recesses into which there can piercingly extend the web of the other flap, the horizontal pivot means of the flaps extend at their lower portion, and wherein at least one flap is provided with at least one further web at the outside thereof which faces away from the other flap and which defines the path of a coin which drops in from above without such being hindered by that web which protrudes at the extension of the other flap into the recess provided therefor at the region at the outside of the one flap.

7. An electronic coin checking device, comprising a measuring channel having an outlet, a controllable coin proper/improper switch means for the reception or return of coins arranged at the outlet of said measuring channel, means defining a coin path of travel for the accepted coins, and at least one controllable follower switch means for sorting the proper coins in typerelated outlet channels arranged beneath said proper- /improper switch means in the coin path of travel for the accepted proper coins, said follower switch means comprises a three-way switch constructed from two movable flaps, means for selectively actuating said flaps, and wherein said flaps can assume a basic position at which time none of the flaps are actuated, wherein one flap is vertically arranged and the other arranged at an inclination, and wherein both upper edges of said flaps extend substantially parallel and contact to one side of an imaginary drop line, so that a coin which arrives from above is deflected via the inclined positioned outer side of the inclined flap from the imaginary fall line towards the other side, wherein upon actuating only one flap such no longer contacts the other flap and assumes a parallel position to the non-actuated flap which remains in its vertical basic position, so that the coin which enters from above can move between both flaps downwardly along the imaginary fall line, and wherein upon actuating both flaps one moves out of the inclined basic position into a vertical work position, the other flap moves out of the vertical basic position into an inclined working position, and wherein both flaps in the working position contact one another along their parallel extending upper edges, contact of said two flaps being established to one side of an imaginary fall line, so that a coin which arrives from above can be deflected towards the other side of the imaginary fall line via the inclined positioned outside surface of the inclined flap, said actuating means for the flaps comprise magnetic actuating means and said flaps are retained in a basic position by the force of 9. The coin checking device as defined in claim 8, wherein all type-related outlet channels of the follower switch means are located in alignment with one another.

10. The coin checking device as defined in claim 9, wherein a number of outlet channels of the follower switch means are serviced by a single two-way switch means for the purpose of doubling the sorting possibilities.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification453/3, 194/346
International ClassificationG07F1/00, G07F1/04, G07D11/00, G07D3/00, G07D3/14
Cooperative ClassificationG07D3/14, G07F1/04
European ClassificationG07D3/14, G07F1/04