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Publication numberUS3917154 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 4, 1975
Filing dateApr 19, 1973
Priority dateApr 19, 1973
Also published asCA1023321A1, DE2418490A1, DE2418490C2
Publication numberUS 3917154 A, US 3917154A, US-A-3917154, US3917154 A, US3917154A
InventorsDouglas J A Dove
Original AssigneeInterstore Transfer Specialist
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Container suited for an expanded volume or reduced volume configuration
US 3917154 A
Abstract
Improvements are made to containers, preferably made of corrugated fibreboard, in which merchandise and other valuable things are packaged, when the container is arranged either in an expanded or a reduced volume configuration and preferably always security sealed during shipment, transfer, and on occasion the temporary storage, of their valuable contents. Such containers have been improved by increasing their strength through the strategic placement of reinforcing antitear tapes, by increasing the height of the liners, and by providing spaced narrow portions of edge structures of subassemblies of this container to create circumferential paths of shorter overall length to receive holding straps.
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United States Patent [1 1 Dove [ 1 Nov. 4, 1975 [75] Inventor: Douglas J. A, Dove, Edmonds,

Wash.

[73] Assignee: Interstore Transfer Specialists, Inc.,

Seattle, Wash.

[22] Filed: Apr. 19, 1973 [21] Appl. No.: 352,516

[52] US. Cl 229/23 R; 229/14 BA [51] Int. Cl. B65D 5/35; B65D 13/00 [58] Field of Search 229/23 R, 23 A, 23 BT,

229/14 R, 14 BA, 41 R, 45 R-48 R, 49; 93/1 E; 220/39 A, 39 B 3,782,619 l/1974 Dittbenner 229/14 R Primary Examiner-Leonard D. Christian Attorney, Agent, or FirmRoy E. Mattem, Jr.

[57] ABSTRACT Improvements are made to containers, preferably made of corrugated fibreboard, in which merchandise and other valuable things are packaged, when the container is arranged either in an expanded or a reduced volume configuration and preferably always security sealed during shipment, transfer, and on occasion the temporary storage, of their valuable contents. Such containers have been improved by increasing their strength through the strategic placement of reinforcing antitear tapes, by increasing the height of the liners, and by providing spaced narrow portions of edge structures of subassemblies of this container to create circumferential paths of shorter overall length to receive holding straps.

34 Claims, 20 Drawing Figures Sheet 1 of 3 U3. Patent Nov. 4, 1975 US. Patent Nov. 4, 1975 Sheet 2 of 3 FIG.

FIG. IO

FIG. 9

FIG. 8

U.S. Patent -Nov.4, 1975 Sheet 3 of3 3,917,154

FIG. 20

CONTAINER SUITED FOR AN EXPANDED VOLUME OR REDUCED VOLUME CONFIGURATION BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Every person concerned with shipping and transferring goods between shipping and receiving locations is concerned with their safe arrival in excellent condition at the lowest possible cost and convenience, when all factors are to be considered. These factors are many such as rule 41 and other rules of the Uniform Freight Classification, published by the railroads, direct cost of the container per se, its disposal cost, its handling cost, its order lead time, its strength and durability under all conditions and especially under severe handling and/or weather conditions, its packing and unloading times and related conveniences, its effective insertion with others in the efficient utilization of the overall cubic receiving volumes of transporting vehicles, and its sealed security of its valuable contents, often shipped with security coded transfer documents and seals.

The full consideration of these factors and many others, more and more, is leading to the utilization of reusable containers. This is indicated by the picture and description of the air cargo container on page 123 of the 1966 publication, entiitled, Packaging For The New Era. This air cargo container consisted of top and bottom caps and a collapsible body, forming a unit only 8 inches high when collapsed and yet providing over 23 cubic feet of cargo space when expanded.

Moreover, the increased use of reusable, many trip, containers is indicated by the utilization of containers, preferably made of corrugated fibreboard, and especially suited for transferring valuable merchandise from distribution service centers to retail stores, etc. During such valuable merchandise transfers, these containers are security sealed, either in an expanded volume or reduced volume configuration, and preferably they include security coded transfer documents and secured coded seals. Containers suitable for such accountable transfer of valuable merchandise, assuring its undamaged arrival in complete quantities, is illustrated and described in US. Pat. 3,438,562 issued on Apr. 15, 1969 to William G. Connor, Douglas J. A. Dove and Donald F. Wright. New embodiments of this type of shipping and transfer container are illustrated and described herein, indicating how they have been improved to increase their sealed security of the valuable contents, their own strength and durability, their con venience of securement, and their reusable operating period.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION When all factors are considered in handling, shipping, and transferring, valuable goods such as merchandise and documents, reusable, multiple trip containers are found to be the best. This is especially true in transferring merchandise between department store service centers and respective retail stores, and in like or somewhat similar distribution patterns, when the containers are arranged either in an expanded volume configuration, while security sealed and coded with a coded accountability transfer document enclosed.

The container first illustrated and described in US. Pat. No. 3,438,562 and as now illustrated and described herein in its improved embodiments, fulfills the stringent requirements established by users, shippers,

and other persons. All these persons have thoroughly considered all the factors pertaining to the handling, shipping, interim storage, and transfer of goods having sufficient value for what they are or what they lead to, to require the accountability of their presence, shipment, transfer, receipt, utilization and possible disposal.

The improvements made include the incorporation of reinforcing antitear materials thereby making the container more resistant to rough handling and to attempted security seal interference. Preferably, reeinforcing strips of nylon filaments are automatically and selectively placed, during production runs of the containers, between the interior side of an outside liner and the adjacent continuous flutes of paperboard laminations which are being formed in planar subassemblies for respective subsequent overall assembly into these convertible volume containers. Another improvement centers on the utilization of liner structures which are sufficiently higher and stronger to first assume compressive loads and thereby substantially avoid any unwanted bulging of the loaded container. Another improvement involves the formation of shorter circumferential path structures in the container, to receive holding straps generally made of co-polymer materials which are automatically machine applied, sealed and secured so tightly to avoid their endwise removal or any other attempted removal, without such attempt being easily detected.

Consequently, incorporating these improvements, these shipping and transfer containers, sealable while being used in either an expanded or reduced volume cnfiguration to protect valuable goods, provide the user with many benefits. For example a shipping and transfer container gives the customer and user: coded and accountable sealed security in one of two selectable volumes; extended periods of reusability while remaining clean inside; space saving collapsibility for smaller shipments and storage; reduced labor requirements in packaging and handling; size range options of different embodiments; maximum use of vehicle cargo spaces; lightweight handling conveniences; utilization of standard tooling and equipment; and realization of savings as losses caused by pilferage and damage are substantially reduced often becoming very minimal.

DRAWINGS OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS The figures of the drawings illustrate how preferred embodiments of the invention are made, arranged and utilized gaining the advantages of the improvements to further enhance the benefits to be derived by the users. They, for example, are shipping and transferring valuable merchandise to and from merchandising distribution service centers and retail stores in either expanded or reduced volume configurations of these transfer containers, sometimes also referred to as interstore transfer contaiers. In so doing these containers, when enroute, are security coded, sealed and preferably include coded transfer documents, placed inside or in outside protective pockets, which account for the contents packed, sent and to be received. 7

FIG. 1 is a perspective view, with portions removed, to illustrate a shipping container often referred to as a transfer container, in its reduced volume configuration awaiting its use, indicating the placement of the rearranged and partially folded down inside liner and the placement of the unsecured loopable coded security seal;

FIG. 2 is a partial sectional view of this shipping and transfer container taken along section line 2-2 of FIG.

FIG. 3 is a partial sectional view of this shipping and transfer container taken along section line 3-3 of FIG.

FIG. 4 is a sectional view of this shipping and transfer container taken just beyond its sealed location showing its expanded volume configuration filled with items of merchandise;

FIG. 5 is a sectional view of this shipping and transfer container taken just beyond its sealed location showing its reduced volume configuration filled with items of merchandise and with the folded down inside liner in its non use position in the bottom;

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of this shipping and transfer container in its expanded volume configuration and sealed upon the securement of two like coded loopable security seals, indicating the provision of blind finger gripping places at each end, and showing with dotted lines the provision of reinforcing antitear tapes to increase the resistance to rough handling and attempted security seal interference;

FIG. 7 is a perspective view, with portions removed, of this shipping and transfer container in its expanded volume configuration and bound together and sealed by using straps placed where some portions of the container assembly have been removed to create a shorter circumferential path, thereby making it impossible to slidably remove a strap in an endwise direction, unless damage occurs, making the attempted entry easily detectable;

FIG. 8 is a partial sectional view taken along section line 88 of FIG. 7 of the shipping and transfer container in its expanded volume configuration to illustrate the use of an inside stronger liner having an initial height slightly higher than the combined height of the wall and the volume changing pivotal flaps;

FIG. 9 is a partial sectional view, similar to the sectional view of FIG. 8, of the shipping and transfer container in its expanded volume configuration to illustrate how the slightly higher inside liner of greater strength first assumes any compression loading occurring when these containers are loaded and stacked, for example, during interstore transfers of merchandise, with the liner and endwise adjacent container portions being somewhat crushed, yet the container sides do not bulge outwardly;

FIGS. 10 and 11 are partial sectional views respectively similar to the sectional views of FIGS. 8 and 9, of the previous containers, not having the improved inner liner of greater height and strength, indicating how, formerly, when the container was arranged in its expanded volume configuration and thereafter excessive compression loadings occurred, the container sides did bulge outwardly;

FIG. 12 is a partial perspective view of top comer portions of an assembled embodiment of the shippingtransfer container indicating how portions are removed to create a circumferential shorter path to receive holding and sealing straps and also indicating how portions are removed to receive projecting integral tabs or toes of the infolded flaps of the cover subassembly;

FIG. 13 is a partial cross sectional view of the top corner portions of an assembled embodiment of the shipping-transfer contaner indicating how portions are removed to create a circumferential shorter path and how a holding and sealing strap, partially shown, follows this shorter path upon its securement;

FIGS. 14 and 15 are, respectively, a partial perspective view and a partial sectional view, of top edge portions of an assembled embodiment of the shippingtransfer container, indicating the securement of a codeable and loopable seal in its sealed position, passing through the various seal receiving holes of the top, its edge flaps, the volume changing pivotal flaps and the liner;

FIGS. 16 and 17 illustrate respectively in a perspective view of a cover subassembly being assembled and in a top view thereof, with portions removed, how the reinforcing antitear tapes of nylon filaments, also indicated by the dotted lines, are placed to offer resistance to rough handling and attempted security seal interference;

FIG. 18 in a partial top view, with portions removed, shows how reinforcing antitear tapes of nylon filament, also indicated by dotted lines, are placed to offer sufficient resistance to rough handling and attempted security seal interference, so in this embodiment of the cover subassembly made for lighter duty, the side infolded flap is not incorporated during the manufacture of the container; and

'FIGS. 19 and 20 illustrate in respective views, the bottom subassembly, in perspective, with portions removed, and in a top view, with portions removed, how the reinforcing antitear tapes of nylon filaments, also indicated by dotted lines, are placed to offer resistance to rough handling and attempted security seal interference, and showing the use of an extended tuck flap.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Introduction In these illustrated embodiments and others available, the shipping and transfer containers, shown and indicated, are made to be repeatedly used throughout an extended operating time, while always keeping the contents being shipped and transferred, clean, undamaged and well acounted for through the utilization of tamper proof seals and coded documents, the original or copy of which is normally placed within the sealed container or within a protective covering on the outside of the container. In so doing, the overall cost considerations are kept competitively low when full and thorough comparisons are undertaken and properly analyzed. The customer and user selecting and utilizing embodiments of this shipping and transfer container assembly receive the following benefits: coded and accountable sealed security in one of two selectable volumes; extended periods of reusability while remaining clean inside; space saving collapsibility for smaller shipments and storage; reduced labor requirements in packaging and handling; size range options of different embodiments; maximum use of vehicle cargo spaces; lightweight handling conveniences; utilization of standard tooling and equipment; and realization of savings as losses caused by pilferage and damage are substantially reduced often becoming very minimal.

How the Shipping-Transfer Container is Used In FIGS. 1 through 6 an embodiment of the invention is shown which is used in the shipping-transfers of merchandise from a distribution service center to retail stores and between retail stores. The container assem bly 30 is illustrated in FIG. 1 in its non-use reduced volume configuration occupying a reasonable minimum amount of temporary storage space. As indicated in FIGS. 2 and 3, taken on respective section lines of FIG. 1, the top subassembly 32 and the bottom subassembly 34 are closely fitted together. Within their interiors a folded liner 36 is placed awaiting its use when container assembly 30 is rearranged quickly into its expanded volume configuration shown in FIGS. 4 and 6.

When container assembly 30 is expanded, as illustrated in FIG. 4, it may be efficiently packed with many items of merchandise, as indicated by the numerals 38, 40, 42, 44, 46, 48, 50, 52, and 54. Also there are times when return shipments to a distribution service center or shipments between retail stores will be smaller. The merchandise then may be well contained within the container assembly 30 in its reduced volume configuration, as illustrated in FIG. 5. Again the merchandise, indicated by numbers 56, 58, 60, and 62, in FIG. 5, is efficiently packed. The liner 36 is more tightly compressed and preferably placed within the bottom subassembly 34, so it always remains a part of the container assembly 30, and the expanded volume configuration will be formed quickly when once again it is needed.

How the Merchandise Contents of the Shipping-Transfer Container are Accounted for When Shipments and Transfers Occur At a merchandise service center, for example, a container assembly 30 is removed from its temporary storage space and arranged, in most instances, into its expanded volume configuration. This is undertaken, by first lifting off the top subassembly 32, then raising the volume changing pivotal flaps 64, 66, 68, 70 of the bottom subassembly 34 into their upright positions, as indicated in FIG. 19, extending upwardly from the bottom sides 72, 74, 76, 78. Then the folded liner 36 is unfolded and placed within the expanded volume inside of the flaps 64, 66, 68 and 70.

At this time merchandise is packed into the bottom subassembly 34 which has been supplemented by the unfolded liner 36. A data recording document identifying the respective items of merchandise is prepared and given a code number correspondng to like numbers on a pair of deburred loopable metal seals 72 or plastic seals. The original document or a copy thereof is placed within the loaded bottom subassembly 34. Then the top subassembly 32 is placed over the expanded bottom subassembly 34. Also alternately or in addition the document or a copy thereof may be placed in a protective enclosure which is secured to the outside of the container.

Loopable Coded Security Seals Thereafter, the respective like coded seals 72, such as illustrated in FIGS. 6, l4 and 15, are looped, respectively, through receiving holes 74, 76, in the top subassembly 32, continuing on through holes 78 in the liner 36, extending on through holes 80 in the volume changing pivotal flaps 64 or 68, and then passing on through holes 82 and 84, respectively, in the infolded side flaps 86 or 88, and sides 90 or 92 of the top subassembly 32.

The separate ends of these paired loopable security seals are then secured by their locking portions 94. Then the expanded volume container assembly 30 as security sealed and coded, for example, is positioned with other containers which preferably are also sealed shipping and transfer container assemblies 30 and moved on a cart and/or a conveyor to a vehicle loading station for shipment to a retail store. Upon arrival at the retail store the seals are observed to ascertain any damage. If thee is damage it is immediately reported. Also when the container assemblies 30 are unpacked, the merchandise removed is checked and compared with the data on the coded recording document. If there are discrepancies, they are, immediately reported. If any seal damage has occurred and/or any merchandise is missing, an investigation is undertaken, as quickly as possible, to determine where and how the container assembly 30 and its merchandise has been mishandled. When merchandise is sent from retail store to retail store, for example, to fill in missing sizes in a stock on hand, or when unsold merchandise is returned to the service center, often in reduced volume configurations of the container assembly 30, the same documenting and sealing procedures are preferably undertaken.

Surrounding Tensioned and Sealed Binding and Security Straps Arranged About a Shorter Circumferential Path on the Shipping and Transfer Container When large volumes of merchandise are being packed for interstore transfer shipments, for example, in merchandise service centers, and many container assemblies 30 are therefore being utilized, automatic strapping machines are operated to place circumferential straps 96 about them in their expanded volume configuration, as shown in FIG. 7. Also at all transfer or shipping places, hand operated strapping machines may be available for securing the shipping and transfer containers. To enhance the security of the enclosed merchandise, portions of the container assembly 30 are formed, during the manufacturing process, to present, upon assembly, shorter circumferential paths to receive respective tensioned and sealed straps 96, as also illustrated in FIG. 7 and in FIGS. 12 and 13. Such restrictive placement of straps 96 makes it impossible for them to be removed endwise, or to be so disarranged in attempting to do so, thereby making an attempted pilfering very noticeable. As shown in greater detail in FIGS. 12 and 13, in order to provide the shorter circumferential paths for the straps 96, die cuts 98 and 100 are made in the top subassembly 32 along its corner edges inclusive of cuts in its infolded side flaps 86 and 88.

Preferably the straps are applied using strapping machines such as those designated by the trademark, Signode. The strapping material is a non-metallic copolymer identified by the trademark Contrax. The ends are pulled and then welded together by the process designated by the trademark, Tension-Weld. Up to forty strapping ties a minute are possible.

Toe and Toe Slot Infolded Flaps of Top Subassembly As illustrated in FIGS. 7, 12, 13 and 17, to enhance the strength of the top subassembly 32, and consequently the overall strength of the container assembly 30, die cuts 102 are made during the manufacture of the top subassembly 32, and also toes 104 are formed on the infolded side flaps 86, 88 and on the infolded end flaps 106, 108 of ends 110, 112. Then upon assembly of the top subassembly 32, as indicated in FIGS. 16 and 7, the toes 104 are securely fitted into the die cuts 102, firmly positioning and holding the infolded side flaps 86, 88 to the sides 90, 92 and holding the infolded 7 end flaps 106, 108 to the ends 110, 112.

Stronger and Higher Liner to Withstand Compression Loads When the container assembly 30 is packed, docu mented, coded and sealed in the expanded volume configuration, it is thereafter often stacked with others for shipment and transfer to substantial overall heights. As a consequence, the compressive loads may become quite large. In anticipation of such an occurrence, the liner 36 is made sufficiently strong to handle a considerable compressive load. To insure it will receive this load first, it is made of greater height than the combined height of the sides 90, 92, ends 110, 112 and volume changing pivotal flaps 64, 66, 68, 70, as indicated in FIGS. 8, 9, 13, 14 and 15. When there are no loads or when lower loads are occurring, the inside liner 36 is contacting the top subassembly 32, as shown in FIG. 8, establishing a reasonable clearance 114 of 1/4 inch, between the top of the volume changing pivotal flap 64 and the top subassembly 32. As the compressive loads become heavier, as shown in FIG. 9, the clearance 116 becomes less. When very heavy loads occur then the volume changing pivotal flaps, such as flap 64, commence in sharing the compressive load.

However, because of this size and strength of the inner liner 36 and its handling of compressive loads, there is substantially no tendency for any bulging out of the volume changing pivotal flaps, such as flap 64, in FIG. 11, where a smaller inner liner 118 has been used with no starting clearance 120 being provided, as shown in FIG. 10.

Strategic Placement of Strong Anti-Tear Tapes to Withstand Rough Handling and Attempted Security Seal Interference As indicated by closely spaced dotted lines in FIGS. 6, 7, 16, 17, 18, 19 and 20, and by solid closely spaced lines where an outer paperboard has been broken away for illustrative purposes in FIGS. 17, 18, 19 and 20, strips of strong antitear tapes 122 are strategically placed to withstand rough handling and attempted security seal interference and like purposes, resulting in longer reusable periods for these container assemblies 30. Their incorporation into the container assembly 30 is undertaken when the respective top subassemblies 32 and bottom subassemblies 34 are being manufactured. As shown in FIGS. 17, 18 and 20, continuous strips of antitear tapes 122 are located just inside the outside liner 124 and adjacent the flutes 126 wherever they are placed.

Their placement is undertaken wherever the antitear tapes 122 will be helpful in stopping tears and distortions of the paperboard materials comprising the corrugated container assemblies 30. The antitear tapes 122 are composed of nylon filaments bonded together in strips which are 3/16 or inches wide, depending on the anticipated forces to be resisted. Generally longer container assemblies include wide antitear tapes 122.

In FIGS. 16 and 17, the placement of antitear tapes 122 are illustrated with respect to the top subassembly 32. There are four antitear strips 122 used, two being used in each side 90, 92 and continuing directly on through the respective fold flaps 128, 130, 132, 134. Therefore when the top subassembly 32 is being converted from its manufactured planar form illustrated in FIG. 17 into its use form as indicated in FIG. 16, the

8 folding in of these fold flaps 128, 130, 132, 134 has the beneficial effect of carrying the antitear tapes or strips 122 around all the respective comers of the top subassembly 32.

In some container assemblies 30, when lighter loads are specified, the incorporation of these antitear tapes 122 may permit the formation of a planar form, as illustrated in FIG. 18, without infolded side flaps 86, 88. Therefore, during the manufacture of this planar form comparatively narrower paperboard materials are used resulting in some savings to a customer, who is able to effectively use such a shipping and transfer container assembly 30.

In FIGS. 19 and 20, the placement of antitear tapes 122 are illustrated with respect to the bottom subassembly 34. There are two antitear tapes or strips 122 used. During manufacture of the planar form illustrated in FIG. 20, one antitear tape 122 is drawn into the forming paperboard composite assembly throughout all 1 the bottom sides 136, 138 and bottom ends 140, 142, during production machine operating, and another antitear tape 122 is drawn into the forming paperboard composite assembly throughout all the volume changing pivotal flaps 64, 66, 68, 70.

These selected placements of antitear tapes 122 in both the top subassembly 32 and bottom subassembly 34 of overall container assembly 30 are directed to avoiding excessive strains and/or tearing at comers and edges. Also very importantly these antitear tapes 122 are placed to avoid excessive strains and/or tearing at finger gripping holes 144 and at security seal receiving holes 76, 82, 84, 146 and die cuts 98. Moreover, as indicated in conjunction with the extended tuck flap 148, which is integral with bottom side 136, the antitear tapes 122 continue right on into the flaps to strengthen them. Normally the antitear tapes are 3/ 16 or inch wide, however, on larger containers, even wider ones will be used, such as inch or wider.

SUMMARY OR ADVANTAGES These illustrated and described embodiments of container assemblies directed to shipping and transferring goods which are always fully accounted for and kept in excellent condition, accomplish this overall purpose and yet may be used over and over again for many shipments and transfers. If the user always keeps the components together and keeps the container assemblies covered when not in use, each container remains a clean container inside throughout its long period of use and it is ever ready to be expanded to a larger volume without hunting around for other components. Moreover, if the coded seals and coded documents are ac-.

tively and properly relied upon pilferage will be substantially eliminated.

Yet all these advantages are obtanined at comparatively low cost when, as preferred, the container assemblies are manufactured from paperboard materials by operating production machinery used in manufacturing corrugated containers of all types. Preferably asshown in FIG. 20, the bottom subassembly will have a A.F.M. bottom structure meaning all flaps meet, to strengthen the overall structure, to keep the interior of the box clean, and to keep loose items from falling through as they are known to do when a less expensive R.S.C. bottom structure, meaning regular slotted container, is

' used.

As now improved with higher and stronger liners, better securement and sealing with straps of a smaller 9 circumferential length, and strategic placements of antitear tapes to withstand tougher handling, heavier loading, and attempted security seal infringements, these container assemblies further increase the following benefits stated once again:

1. coded and accountable sealed security in one of two selectable volumes;

2. extended periods of reusability while remaining clean inside;

3. space saving collapsibility for smaller shipments and storage;

4. reduced labor requirements in packaging and handling;

5. size range options of different embodiments;

6. maximum use of vehicle cargo spaces;

7. lightweight handling conveniences;

8. utilization of standard tooling and equipment; and

9. realization of savings as losses caused by pilferage and damage are substantially reduced often becoming very minimal.

I claim:

1. A container assembly reusable for many shipments and transfers, arrangeable in an expanded volume configuration and in a reduced volume configuration, comprising:

a. a cover subassembly having: a planar top surface structure and depending flaps forming a lid; and reinforcing antitear means for said depending flaps, thereby making said cover subassembly more resistant to rough handling; and

b. a bottom subassembly; having: a planar bottom surface structure; upstanding side surface structures whose lower edges join the outer edges of the bottom surface structure; straight line scores, running the full length of each side surface structure, parallel to the bottom surface structure, dividing each side surface structure into an upper part, or volume changing flap, and a lower part, or fixed side structure said fixed side structures being joined together along their lateral edges, and said scores permitting the volume changing flaps to be pivoted with respect to the fixed side structures; an additional volume changing structure collapsible during the reduced volume configuration and expandable during the expanded volume configuration to supplement the strength of the volume changing flaps; and reinforcing antitear means for the volume changing flaps thereby making the said bottom subassembly more resistant to rough handling.

2. A container assembly reusable for many shipments and transfers, as claimed in claim 1, wherein the reinforcing antitear means is composed of strips of nylon filaments.

3. A container assembly reusable for many shipments and transfers, as claimed in claim 1, wherein the additional volume changing structure is initially, before receiving a compressive loading force, of greater height than the combined height of one of the volume changing flaps and one of the fixed side structures, to thereby first receive any compression loads to be transmitted between the cover subassembly and the bottom subassembly, substantially eliminating any tendency for the volume changing flaps to bulge outwardly.

4. A container assembly reusable for many shipments and transfers, as claimed in claim 1, comprising, in addition, tamper proof seal receiving means in both the cover and bottom subassemblies.

5. A container assembly reusable for many shipments and transfers, as claimed inclaim 4, comprising, in addition, loopable tamper proof seals for placement through both of the tamper proof seal receiving means.

6. A container assembly reusable for many shipments and transfers, as claimed in claim 4, comprising, in addition, completely surrounding tensioned and sealed straps.

7. A container assembly reusable for many shipments and transfers as claimed in claim 4, comprising, in addition, completely surrounding tensioned and sealed straps having an effective length less than the circumference of the container assembly when placed at the tamper proof seal receiving means.

8. A container assembly reusable for many two way shipments and transfers, while security sealed and preferably with a transfer document enclosed within the sealed volume, arrangeable either in an expanded volumeconfiguration or in a reduced volume configuration, often being used, to transfer goods between department store service centers and respective retail stores, comprising:

a. a cover subassembly having: a planar top surface structure and depending flaps forming a lid; tamper proof seal receiving means; and reinforcing antitear means for the depending flaps, thereby making said flaps and said seal receiving means more resistant to rough handling and to attempted security seal interference; and

b. a bottom subassembly having: a planar bottom surface structure; four upstanding side surface structures whose lower edges join the outer edges of the bottom surface structure; straight line scores, running the full length of each side surface structure, parallel to the bottom surface structure, dividing each side surface structure into an upper part, or volume changing flap, and a lower part, or fixed side structure said fixed side structures being joined together along their lateral edges, and said scores permitting the volume changing flaps to be pivoted with respect to the fixed side structures; an additional volume changing structure collapsible during the reduced volume configuration and expandable during the expanded volume configuration to supplement the strength of the volume changing flaps; tamper proof seal receiving means; and reinforcing antitear means for the volume changing flaps, thereby making said flaps and said seal receiving means more resistant to rough handling and to attempted security seal interference.

9. A container assembly reusable for many two way shipments and transfers, while security sealed, as claimed in claim 8, wherein the tamper proof receiving means in both the cover and bottom subassemblies are respective spaced holes.

10. A container assembly reusable for many two way shipments and transfers, while security sealed, as claimed in claim 9, having, in addition, loopable tamper proof seals for placement through the respective spaced holes.

11. A container assembly reusable for many two way shipments and transfers, while security sealed, as

claimed in claim 8, wherein the tamper proof receiving means on both the cover and bottom subassemblies are spaced respective narrow edge cutouts.

12. A container assembly reusable for many two way shipments and transfers, while security sealed, as claimed in claim 11, having, in addition, completely 1 l surrounding tensioned and sealed straps passing around the respective narrow edge cutouts.

13. A corrugated container assembly reusable for multiple two way shipments and transfers, preferably while security sealed with an accountability transfer document enclosed, and arranged either in an expanded volume configuration or in a reduced volume configuratiomoften being transferred between department store service centers and respective retail stores, comprising:

a. a corrugated cover subassernbly, having: a planar top surface and depending flaps forming a lid; tamper proof seal receiving means; and reinforcing antitear means for the depending flaps, thereby, making said flaps and said seal receiving means more resistant to rough handling and to attempted security seal interference;

b. a corrugated bottom subassernbly having: a planar bottom surface structure; four upstanding side surface structures Whose lower edges join the outer edges of the bottom surface structure; straight line scores, running the full length of each side surface structure, parallel to the bottom surface structure, dividing each side surface structure into an upper part, or volume changing flap, and a lower part, or fixed side structure said fixed side structures being joined together along their lateral edges, and said scores permitting the volume changing flaps to be pivoted with respect to the fixed side structures: tamper proof seal receiving means; and reinforcing antitear means for the volume changing flaps and the fixed side structures; thereby making said flaps, said sides, and said seal receiving means more resistant to rough handling and to attempted security seal interference; and

c. a corrugated inside liner subassernbly foldable for inclusion in the reduced volume configuration and expandable for inclusion in the expanded volume configuration alongside the fixed side structures and the volume changing flaps, and having tamper proof seal receiving means.

14. A corrugated container assembly reusable for multiple two way shipments and transfers, as claimed in claim 13, wherein the corugated inside liner subassembly is of greater height than the combined height of one of the fixed side structures and one of the volume changing flaps to thereby first receive any compression loads to be transmitted between the respective cover and bottom subassemblies, substantially eliminating any tendency for said volume changing flaps to bulge outwardly.

15. A corrugated container assembly reusable for multiple two way shipments and transfers, as claimed in claim 13, wherein said tamper proof seal receiving means in both said cover and said bottom subassemblies are respective spaced holes.

16. A corrugated container assembly reusable for multiple two way shipments and transfers, as claimed in claim 15, having, in addition, loopable tamper proof seals for placement through the respective spaced holes.

17. A corrugated container assembly reusable for multiple two way shipments and transfers, as claimed in claim 13, wherein the tamper proof seal receiving means in both the cover and bottom subassemblies are spaced respective edge cutouts.

18. A corrugated container assembly reusable for multiple two way shipments and transfers, as claimed in claim 17, having, in addition, completely surrounding tensioned and sealed straps passing around the respective edge cutouts and being of a resultant lengthpre-,

venting their endwise sliding removal without incurring damage to them and any of the corrugated portions of the container assembly.

19. A corrugated container assembly reusable for multiple two way shipments and transfers, as claimed in claim 14, wherein the tamper proof seal receiving means in both the cover and bottom subassemblies are.

spaced respective edge cutouts.

20. A corrugated container assembly reusable for multiple two way shipments and transfers, as claimed in claim 19, having in addition completelysurrounding tensioned and sealed straps passing around the respective edge cutouts and being of a resultant length preventing their endwise sliding removal without incurring damage to them and any of the corrugated portions of the container assembly.

21. A corrugated container assembly reusable for multiple two way shipments and transfers, as claimed in I claim 13, wherein said reinforcing antitear means is composed of strips of nylon filaments.

22. A corrugated container assembly reusable for multiple two way shipments and transfers, as claimed in claim 21, wherein said strips of nylon filaments, serving as said antitear means, are placed during the container manufacturing process between the interior side of the outside face and the adjacent corrugations of said container assembly.

23. A corrugated container assembly reusable for multiple two way shipments and transfers, as claimed in claim 22, wherein said strips of nylon filaments serving as said antitear means are placed to distribute lifting loads and seal tampering forces.

24. A corrugated container assembly reusable for multiple two way shipments and transfers, as claimed in claim 13, wherein the corrugated cover subassernbly, comprises, in addition, infolded flaps pivotally and integrally made with the depending flaps forming a stronger corrugated cover subassernbly.

25. A corrugated container assembly reusable for multiple two way shipments and transfers, as claimed in claim 24, wherein the corrugated cover subassernbly includes interfitting respective toe projections and toe holes to removably secure the infolded flaps.

26. A corrugated container assembly reusable for multiple two way shipments and transfers, as claimed in claim 13, wherein said volume changing flaps have finger receiving means used to lift said corrugated container assembly.

27. A corrugated container assembly reusable for multiple two way shipments and transfers, as claimed in claim 26, wherein said reinforcing antitear means is located to distribute lifting forces applied at said finger receiving means.

28. A corrugated container assembly reusable for multiple two way shipments and transfers, as claimed in claim 27, wherein the reinforcing antitear means is a strip of nylon filaments.

29. A corrugated container assembly reusable for multiple two way shipments and transfers, as claimed in claim 28, wherein the. reinforcing antitear means is located between the interior side of the outside face and the adjacent corrugations.

30. A container assembly reusable for many shipments and transfers, as claimed in claim 8, wherein the additional volume changing structure is initially, before receiving a compressive loading force, of greater height than the combined height of one of the volume changing flaps and one of the fixed side structures, said volume changing structure thereby first receives any compression loads to be transmitted between the cover subassembly and the bottom subassembly, substantially eliminating any tendency for the volume changing pivotal flaps to buldge outwardly 31. A container assembly reusable for many shipments and transfers, arrangeable either in an expanded volume configuration or in a reduced volume configuration, comprising:

a. a cover subassembly having a planar top surface structure and depending flaps forming a lid;

b. a bottom subassembly having: a planar bottom surface structure; upstanding side surface structures whose lower edges join the outer edges of the bottom surface structure; straight line scores, running the full length of each side surface structure, parallel to the bottom surface structure, dividing each side surface structure into an upper part, or volume changing flap, and a lower part, a fixed side structure, said fixed side structure being joined together along their lateral edges, and said scores permitting the volume changing flaps to be pivoted with respect to the fixed side structures; and a liner subassembly, collapsible during the reduced volume configuration and expandable during the expanded volume configuration, which when expanded and before receiving any compressive loading forces is of greater height than the combined height of one of the volume changing flaps and one of the fixed side structures, and which thereby first receives any compression loads to be transmitted between the cover subassembly and the bottom subassembly, substantially eliminating any tendency for the volume changing flaps to bulge outwardly.

32. A corrugated container assembly reusable for mutiple two way shipments and transfers, preferably while security sealed with an accountability transfer document enclosed, and arranged either in an expanded volume configuration or in a reduced volume configuration, often being transferred between depart- 14 ment store service centers and respective retail stores, comprising:

a. a corrugated cover subassembly, having: a planar top surface and depending flaps forming a lid; and tamper proof seal receiving means;

b. a corrugated bottom subassembly having: a planar bottom surface structure; upstanding side surface structures whose lower edges join the outer edges of the bottom surface structure; straight line scores, running the full length of each side Surface structure, parallel to the bottom surface structure, dividing each side surface structure into an upper part, or volume changing flap, and a lower part, or fixed side structure, said fixed side structures being joined together along their lateral edges, and said scores permitting the volume changing flaps to be pivoted with respect to the fixed side structures; and tamper proof seal receiving means; and

c. a corrugated inside liner subassembly foldable for inclusion in the reduced volume configuration and expandable for inclusion in the expanded volume configuration alongside the fixed side structures and the volume changing flaps, said liner subassembly being, when expanded and before receiving any compressive loading forces, of greater height than the combined height of one of the volume changing flaps and one of the fixed side structures, so that said liner subassembly first receives any compression loads to be transmitted between the cover subassembly and the bottom subassembly, substantially elminating any tendency for the volume changing flaps to bulge outwardly.

33. A corrugated container assembly reusable for multiple two way shipments and transfers, as claimed in claim 14, wherein the tamper proof seal receiving means in both the cover and bottom subassemblies are respective spaced holes.

34. A corrugated container assembly reusable for multiple two way shipments and transfers, as claimed in claim 33, having, in addition, loopable tamper proof seals for placement through the respective spaced holes.

Patent Citations
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US3782619 *Jun 29, 1972Jan 1, 1974Dittbenner CShipping container
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4101052 *Mar 4, 1977Jul 18, 1978Interstore Transfer Specialists, Inc.Containers for transferring merchandise between distribution service centers and retail stores, while security sealed in either an expanded or a reduced volume configuration
US4272009 *Oct 31, 1979Jun 9, 1981Manville Forest ProductsOne-piece double depth shipping container
US4358048 *Apr 24, 1981Nov 9, 1982Kupersmit Julius BCollapsible shipping container having reinforced base element
US4358049 *Apr 24, 1981Nov 9, 1982Kupersmit Julius BCollapsible shipping container with reinforcing insert
US4576280 *Apr 5, 1984Mar 18, 1986Anna Lena DoveHanging garment container
US4596355 *Feb 6, 1984Jun 24, 1986Kupersmit Julius BCollapsible shipping container having collapsed planar profile
US4898301 *Feb 23, 1989Feb 6, 1990Henning SchickCollapsible container for flowable media
US5941405 *Dec 3, 1996Aug 24, 1999Scales; Peter BruceCollapsible airline cargo container
Classifications
U.S. Classification229/117.2, 229/125.21, 229/125.22, 206/807, 229/122.33, 229/125.29, 229/122.32
International ClassificationB65D5/36, B65D5/02, B65D6/24, B65D5/68, B65D5/44
Cooperative ClassificationB65D5/441, Y10S206/807, B65D5/68, B65D5/36
European ClassificationB65D5/36, B65D5/68, B65D5/44B