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Publication numberUS3917273 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 4, 1975
Filing dateJul 19, 1974
Priority dateJul 19, 1974
Publication numberUS 3917273 A, US 3917273A, US-A-3917273, US3917273 A, US3917273A
InventorsIii Eldred G Blakewood
Original AssigneeIii Eldred G Blakewood
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Multiple chess or checker game board
US 3917273 A
Abstract
A flat, two-dimensional game board appratus which can accomodate a plurality of sets of pieces controlled by opposing players comprising a playing area of circular configuration wherein there is included a plurality of chessboards of conventional pattern, each of which contains eight discrete spaces of alternating color on a side providing eight ranks and eight files (64 alternately colored smaller incremental areas comprising the total area of a chessboard, and an additional file area providing an added checkered area separating said chessboards, each of which contains one or a plurality of incremental file areas of alternating color squares which adjoin said chessboards, one to the other, to provide a continuous playing area whereon the pieces of opposing players can be moved within the boundaries of each conventional chessboard pattern as formed by the added files, or moved across the added files to provide a continuous playing area.
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United States Patent [191 Blakewood, III

[ 51 Nov. 4, 1975 MULTIPLE CHESS OR CHECKER GAME BOARD [76] Inventor: Eldred G. Blakewood, H1, 825

Elizabeth St., Baton Rouge, La. 70815 [22] Filed: July 19, 1974 [21] Appl. No.: 490,095

[52] US. Cl. 273/131 KN [51] Int. (11. A63F 3/02 [58] Field of Search 273/131, 136

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,553,611 9/1925 Harrison 273/134 G 3,610,626 10/1971 Nolte 273/131 AB 3,776,554 12/1973 Capablanca et a1 273/131 AB Primary Examiner-Delbert B. Lowe Attorney, Agent, or FirmL. A. Proctor [57] ABSTRACT A flat, two-dimensional game board appratus which can accomodate a plurality of sets of pieces controlled by opposing players comprising a playing area of circular configuration wherein there is included a plurality of chessboards of conventional pattern, each of which contains eight discrete spaces of alternating color on a side providing eight ranks and eight files (64 alternately colored smaller incremental areas comprising the total area of a chessboard), and an additional file area providing an added checkered area separating said chessboards, each of which contains one or a plurality of incremental file areas of altemating color squares which adjoin said chessboards, one to the other, to provide a continuous playing area whereon the pieces of opposing players can be moved within the boundaries of each conventional chessboard pattern as formed by the added files, or moved across the added files to provide a continuous playing area.

31 Claims, 24 Drawing Figures US. Patent Nov. 4, 1975 Sheet 1 of6 3,917,273

FIGURE I .D C U am 2 2 E M H mm "mm n n U U U W m m m I m F F F n F FIGURE 20 US. Patent Nov. 4, 1975 .Sheet20f6 3,917,273

3 E R U m F FIGURE 4 US. Patent Nov. 4, 1975 Sheet 3 of6 3,917,273

FIGURE 5 US. Patent Nov. 4, 1975 FIGURE 7b FIGURE 70 FIGURE 8b U.S. Patent Nov. 4, 1975 Sheet50f6 3,917,273

FIGURE 9 FIGURE IO FIGURE ll U.S. Patent N0 v.4,1975 Sheet6of6 3,917,27 3

FIGURE I2 22 2 FIGURE [3 FIGURE l4 MULTIPLE CHESS OR CHECKER GAME BOARD A chess game or checker game board of circular configuration, the basic pattern of which includes two or more conventional chessboards, or checker game boards, each conventional board having eight ranks and eight files of alternating dark and light squares, adjacent conventional boards being separated by one or more files of similar alternating dark and light squares" of up to eight ranks, and all arranged into one continuous playing area such that ranks are continuous through all the playing area of the gameboard. In the configuration, each rank forms a circular band, concentric with the other circular ranks, and with each file radiating, spokelike, from the center area which, preferably, is void of alternating dark and light squares. The number of sets of chessmen or checkers is either equal to or double the number of conventional chessboards, or checkerboards, depending upon the type of game to be played. Each set of chessman is composed of 16 men as in the conventional game; one King, one Queen, two Rooks, two Bishops, two Knights, and eight Pawns. Chessmen, at the start of a game, are placed on the outer ranks as in the conventional manner for chess. The number of players may vary from two up to the number of sets of chessmen onthe board. Play is in a regular order with moves of the men the same as or similar to moves on a conventional 64 square board, some moves being modified or adapted for play on a circular type gameboard in accordance with the rules of this game. Checkers are played in the conventional manner of checker play but with an increased number of checkers.

Chess, a game normally played with a board and special pieces, is preeminent among intellectual games and often called the royal game."The game probably originated in India sometime during the seventh century and spread to Persia, Arabia and then to Western Europe. The conventional chessboard is comprised of a playing area of-64 squares, 32 alternate light and 32 alternate dark colors, contained in a larger square. ln playing position, the board is placed so that a light square is located nearest the right hand of each of two opposing players. A row of eight squares parallel to the light and dark squares is called a rank, and a row at right angles to the ranks is called a file.

Despite the antiquity of chess, many new forms of chess boards have been created, and many new versions of the game of chess are now practiced on these different game boards. The new chess boards often contain the original pattern of 64 alternate light and dark squares with additional squares located, e.g., at opposite ends of the center board (U.S. Pat. No. 3,700,242); multiple units or repeating units comprised of the conventional chess board pattern (U.S. Pat. No. 3,610,626); and numerous other variations wherein light and dark squares are arranged in ranks and files in accordance with atwo-dimensional scheme. (See, e.g., U.S. Pat. Nos. 3,652,091; 3,595,580; 3,533,627;

3,433,482; 1,780,038; 1,555,937; 1,554,094; 1,339,013; 1,134,922 and 511,306). Additionally, three-dimensional chess games have developed wherein the basic or conventional chess board pattern is sub-divided and components thereof located at different elevations. (See, e.g., US. Pat. Nos. 3,684,285; 3,664,671; 3,656,756; 3,399,895 and 1,877,154.)

These changes in the chess game board have resulted in variousmodifications of the basic game, in many of which two, three, four or more players can participate.

The game of checkers, played on a similar game board, also dates back to antiquity and was played by the Pharoahs. Antonio Torquemada of Valencia, Spain, published the first book on checkers in 1547. Variations of the game of checkers are also known, e.g., Spanish checkers and Turkish checkers, the same game board being employed in these variations of the game.

The present invention relates to further advances in chess, and more particularly to chessgame and checker game board apparatus.

The present invention has as its principal objective the providing of a flat, two-dimensional chessgame board and chessgame which may utilize two sets or more than the two sets of chessmen as used in the conventional chessgame, and, with an expanded use of strategy and tactics necessary for play on an enlarged gameboard.

Another objective of the invention is the development of a chessgame in which the number of players participating is limited only by the size of the board available, such boards being practical for as few as two opposing sets of chessmen to as many as twelve or more complete sets of chessmen.

Another objective of the invention is to provide a game simple enough for the novice chess player to play and enjoy as well as for the more experienced or expert player. I

Another objective of the invention is to provide a chessgame in which the moves of the chessmen are in the conventional manner of chess, modified only as required for play on the circular type game board.

A further objective of the invention is to provide a chessgame for more than two players in which a player on losing his King is not forced from the game, but becomes an ally of the player capturing his King. In this manner, and unlike many popular games with three or more players in which a defeated or bankrupted player is automatically retired from the game, all players remain active until the game is concluded.

Another objective of the invention is to provide a chessgame in which players may act as allies or as teams, but, with any player having the option of remaining unallied and in opposition to all other players.

A further objective of the invention is to provide a game in which the element of chance is minimized and in which relative success is determined through understanding, skill, tactics and strategy.

Another objective of the invention is to provide a chessboard on which a number ,of conventional chess games may be played simultaneously. I

Another objective of the invention is to provide a gameboard on which the conventional game of checkers may be greatly expanded in the number of alternating dark and light squares and in the number of checker pieces available for play.

These objects and others are achieved pursuant to the present invention which comprises a flat twodimensional gameboard apparatus with a playing area of circular configuration wherein a plurality of chessboards of conventional pattern, i'.e., one which contains eight discrete spaces or squares of alternating color on a side providing'eight ranks and eight filesf( 64 alternately colored small squares comprising a large square) are each separated one from another by a file area comprising an additional file orfiles, the ranks and files appearing as colored Squares, concentric 'circular bands or as radials of alternating color. The file area, i.e., the file or files, which separate the several conventional component chessboards'of the total pattern are ofvarying patterns, are themselves of checkered pattern, and provide an enlarged playing area of'checkered pattern which permits the use of two or more sets of playing pieces, preferably conventional chess pieces, and double, or more than double, the number of conventional chessboards contained in the overall playing area, depending on the type of game to be played. The sets of playing pieces are 16 in number and are distinguished-by their shape into six kinds, preferably conventional chess pieces; king, queen, rook, bishop, knight and pawn. The 16 pieces of a chess set are constituted of one king, one queen, two rooks, two bishops, twokni'ghts'arid eight pawns. The*movements of the chess piec'es arethe same as in a conventional chess game and follow the laws of chess as formulated by the WOrId'Chess Federation except that, due to the files which separate the conventional chessboard components of the total pattern, the chess pieces can be moved fromone board to another in playing a game;

' Each opposing player normally controls'one set of chess pieces which are placed on the board at the beginning of a gameXA 'king (K) moves in any direction, onevsq-uare at a time.--A queen (Q),rook'(R) or bishop (B are long range pieces, moving any distance along an unobstructed line. A rook moves only on the ranks andfiles, but not diagonally; a bishop only on the diagonals, but only" on squares of its own color. A queen combinesthe powers of rook and bishop and thus can move on any open line. A knights (Kn) move is made up of two different steps. It takes one step on one single square along the file or rank and then, still moving away from the square that it has left, takes one step alongthe diagonal. This is not a line move, but a move frompoint to point and hence cannot beobstructed by any neighboring pieces. Any piece not a pawn (P) captures'in the same way that it moves, i.e., it 'may capture and replace an'adv'erse piece standing on a square to which itcan legally move. The replacedadverse piece is removed from the board, the capturing piece replacing-the captured piece in the same square.

Apawn (P) moves'only forward, and when not capturin'g moves only on the file. For the first advance from its initial square on the second rank, a pawn has the 'opt-ionof movingone or two squares, but thereafter may move only one square at a time. If it reaches the eighth rank farthest from the owner, the pawn is immediately replaced by a queen, bishop, rook or knight of the same color, at the option of the owner. This step is usually called queen'ing, since the usual choice is a queen, which isthem'ost' powerful piece. A pawn may promote even though the piece'chosen to replace it has not previously disappeared from' -the board by capture,

e.g., a player may have two or more queens. The pawn als'o captures differently from its non-capturing move.

It captures to either square'that is adjacent and diagonally forward; If a pawnmakes-the double advance for its first move, an adverse pawn that could have captured'it, had the first pawn moved only one square, may capture it in passing," but this capture 'may be made only on-the immediate turn, not'later.

Castling 'is' a compound move of the king and one rook (formerly called a castle) that may be made, if

at all, only once in a game. It is legal if neither the king nor the rook has yet moved; if all the squares between them on the rank are vacant and no adverse piece commands the two squares nearest the king on the side on which castling is to be carried out; and if the king is not i in check. The move is executed by moving the kingtwo squares toward the rook, and then placing the rook on the square passed over by the king.

The invention, and the principles of play involved, will be more fully understood by reference to the following detailed description of specific embodiments and to the attached drawings to which reference is made in the description. In the description, similar members are used to represent similar parts or components, and whole numbers are used in generic sense to indicate a plurality of similar parts or components.

In the drawings:

FIG. I is a schematic diagram illustrating the basic scheme employed in the game board structure of this invention, the game board being comprised of a plural ity, in this instance an even number, of conventional chessboards in a circular arrangement with intermediate file areas between adjacent, chessboards.

FIG. 2a shows the conventional chessboards and the intermediate file areas of FIG. 1 modified to form a circular pattern.

FIG. 2b, shows the typical intermediate file area as consisting of an odd number of files with ranks seven and eight deleted.

FIG. 2c shows the typical intermediate file area as consisting of an even number of files with ranks seven and eight deleted.

FIG. 2d shows the typical intermediate file area as consisting of an odd number of files with ranks one and two and ranks seven and eight deleted.

FIG.. 22 shows the typical intermediate file area as consisting of an even number of files with ranks one and two and ranks seven and eight deleted.

FIG. 2f shows the typical intermediate file area as consisting of an odd number of files with all eight ranks included.

FIG. 2g shows the typical intermediate file area as consisting of an even number of files with all eight ranks included.

FIG. 3 shows the game board composed of an even number of modified conventional chessgame board units with the intermediate file areas being of one file each with ranks seven and eight deleted.

FIG. 4 illustrates the initial positioning of the chessmen on a typical 64 square unit for Game TypeA.

FIG. 5 illustrates the initial positioning of the chessmen on a typical 64 square unit for Game Type B ,and Game Type C.

FIG. 6 illustrates the initial positioning of checkers square units with the intermediate file areas having an even. number of files with ranks one and two and ranks seven and eight deleted.

FIG. shows a game board for Game Type D composed of an even number of 64 square, units with the intermediate file areas having an even number of files with all eight ranks included.

FIG. 8a shows a game board for Game Type A composed ,of an odd number of 64-square units with the intermediate file areas having an even number of files with ranks seven and eight deleted.

FIG. 8b shows a game board for Game Type B and Game Type C composed of an odd number of' 64 square units with the intermediate file areas having an even number of files with ranks one and two and ranks seven and eight deleted.

FIG. 80 shows'a game board for Game Type D composed of a odd number of 64 square units with the intermediate file areas having all eight ranks included.

FIG. 9 illustrates the King chesspiece moves.

'FIG. 10 illustrates the Queen chesspiece moves.

FIG. 11 illustrates the Pawn chessman moves.

FIG. 12 illustrates the Bishop chesspiece moves.

FIG. 13 illustrates the Rook chesspiece moves.

FIG. 14 illustrates the Knight chesspiece moves.

Referring first to FIG. 1 of the drawings, reference character 1 represents units which per se constitute conventional chess or checker game boards with eight ranks 2 (parallel rows of squares) and eight files 3 (vertical rows of squares) to make up a typical board of 64 alternating light and dark squares. Each conventional board 1 is separated from an adjacent board 1 by a file area 4, of pattern subsequently described by any of FIGS. 2b through 2g, composed of either an even or an odd number of files. The conventional boards 1 and the intermediate file areas 4 are shown diagrammatically in a circular arrangement and, when fitted together, the contiguous members form a gameboard pursuant to the practice of this invention.

Amore practical, and preferred, arrangement of the chess or checker board is provided when the game boards 1 and file areas 4 are modified sufficiently to enable adjacent members 1,4 to fit together in a circular configuration as shown by reference to FIG. 2a. FIG. 2a shows the diagrammatic arrangement of the boards IV of FIG. 1 that results when equivalent ranks 2 of each board 1 are equally distance from a center point 5, and when each file 3 radiates from the central point 5. Each board 1 and each intermediate file area 4 is as a consequence modified to form a partial sector ofa circle and similarly each of the alternating light and dark squares"becomes a partial sector of a circle. The alternating light and dark partial sectors are referred to as squares" in subsequent references. FIGS. 2b, 2c, 2d, 2e, 2f, and 2g show various intermediate file areas 4. The alternating dark squares of the intermediate files are indicated to be of a different color or shading than the dark squares of the typical board, which can be used in lieu of the file areas 4 (shown blank) in the pattern described by reference to FIG. 2a. In discussing ranks, ranks are numbered-from one to eight in the order of their occurrence from the interior rank (closest to center 5) to the outside rank.

As heretofore-suggested: FIG. 2b shows the typical intermediate file area 4 as consisting of an odd number of files 7, in this instance one, with ranks seven and eight, depicted by reference numeral 9, deleted. Ranks of the file are depicted by reference numeral 6.

FIG. shows the typical intermediate file area 4 as consisting of an even number of files 7, in this instance two, with ranks seven and eight deleted, as depicted by reference numeral 9. Ranks of the files are depicted by reference numerals 6.

FIG. 211 shows the typical intermediate file area 4 as consisting of an odd number of files 7, in this instance one, with ranks one and two and ranks seven and eight deleted, as shown by reference numerals 10 and 9, respectively.

FIG. 22 shows the typical intermediate file area 4 as consisting of an even number of files 7, in this instance two, with ranks one and two and ranks seven and eight deleted, as depicted by reference numerals 10 and 9, respectively.

FIG. 2f shows the typical intermediate file area 4 as consisting of an odd number of files 7, in this instance one, with all eight ranks 6 included.

FIG. 2g shows the typical intermediate file area 4 as consisting of an even number of files 7, in this instance two in number, with all eight ranks 6 included.

FIG. 3 shows a game board 8 of this disclosure thus formed when the ranks 2 of conventional eight by eight 64 squares game boards of FIG. 2a and the ranks 6 of the intermediate files 7 of FIG. 2b are joined and made continuous, i.e., the files 4 of FIG. 2a are replaced by the files 4 of FIG. 2b. The number of conventional boards 1 included in a game board 8 may be either odd or even, and as many as may be practical accounting for size limitations and the number of players to be provided for. The number of files 7 of the intermediate file areas 4 may be odd or even and may vary in number. For Game Type A, ranks seven and eight, depicted by reference numeral 9, of the intermediate files are deleted as is shown in FIG. 2b and FIG. 2c. For Game Type B and Game Type C, ranks one and two, depicted by reference numeral 10, and ranks seven and eight, depicted by reference numeral 9, are deleted as is shown in FIG. 2 d and FIG. 2e. And, for Game Type D, all ranks 6 are included as is shown in FIG. 2f and FIG. 2g.

The chess pieces, or chessmen, are placed on the board in the manner as for conventional chess. One set of sixteen chessmen for each conventional board is required for Game Type A, the chessmen being placed at the beginning of play on ranks seven and eight of each chess board as is shown in FIG. 4. Two sets of chessm en for each conventional board are required for Game Type B and Game Type C, the chessman being placed at the beginning of play on ranks one and two and ranks seven and eight in the conventional manner of chess as shown in FIG. 5. For Game Type D, the game pieces are conventional checkers (of different colors) and are placed similar to the conventional manner as shown in FIG. 6. Sets of one color are placed on ranks one, two and three and sets of the second color are placed on ranks six, seven and eight. The number of checkers required is dependent upon the total number of files contained in the game board. To convert a game board from one game type to another game type, overlays can be used to increase or decrease the ranks of the intermediate files.

GAME TYPE A With reference to FIG. 3, FIG. 7a and FIG. 8a for Game Type A, ranks seven and eight 9 of the intermediate files, as will be observed, are not included in the playing area. Rank one 11 together with the void central area 12 constitute the protected area. The number of-players may be from two up to the number of con ventional board units 1 in the composite gameboard 8. Players may play independently from each other, or alliances may be formed between players, such alliances being agreed upon before commencing the game. Each set of chessmen is of a different color and is placed on the game board 8 in the conventional chess manner on ranks seven and eight as shown in FIG. 4. Opposing Kings are captured rather than checkmated. The player losing his King becomes an ally of the capturing player and continues his play in such a manner as to aid in his captors strategy and tactics. When only one King remains uncaptured, the game is concluded with the winner being the side with the sole surviving King. In the case of alliances, only one King is played by an alliance, with the other King, or Kings, of the alliance being replaced by a Rook, or Rooks.

GAME TYPE B With reference to FIG. 7b and FIG.8b, ranks one and two and seven and eight 9 of the intermediate files are not included in the playing area. Chessmen are placed on the game board 8 in the conventional manner shown in FIG. 5. There are two sets of chessmen for each conventional board unit 1 with the set on ranks one and two being of 2 different color from the set on ranks seven and eight for a game with two players only. The number of players may be from two up to the number of sets of chessmen on the gameboard. For more than two players, the chess sets are each of a different color. In general, the play and the objective of the game is as for Game Type A.

GAME TYPE C With reference to FIG, 3 and FIGS. 7a through 80, each conventional board unit 1 is separate and one conventional chess game is played on each board. The advantage of this type of board is that it allows for the playing of a number of individual games on the same gameboard as might be occasioned for chess games by players in separate vicinities with communication for play being sent by mail service.

GAME TYPE D With reference to FIG. 70 and FIG. 8c, all ranks of the intermediate file areas 4 are included as a part of the game board. Conventional checkers are used for Game Type D with the two colors of movers placed as shown in FIG. 6. A set of one color is placed on ranks one, two and three with the remaining set placed on ranks six, seven and eight. Play is as in conventional checkers.

In Game Types A and B the chessmen move in the same manner or in'a manner based on the conventional chess moves. The capture of an opposing chessman is made by moving onto the square occupied by the opposing chessman as in conventional chess. In Game Type C, which is the conventional chess game, all moves are unchanged and are not detailed further. In Game Type D, which is the enlarged checker game, all moves are unchanged and are not detailed further.

The King, K: Reference is made to FIG. 9. The King 14 moves one square at a time in any direction from its square in Game Types A and B. In addition, in Game Type A the King may not be captured if in the protected area which includes the center area 12 and rank one 11. On advancing to rank one, the King 15 is placed in the center area 12 until it is desired or becomes necessary to move him back into the combat area. A King 15, on leaving the protected area 11,12, may advance radially or diagonally as many squares as may be unoccupied but cannot capture on the leaving move. The leaving move from the protected area may be from any unoccupied square of rank one 11. A captured King cannot be exchanged for a Pawn. Pawn exchanges are noted in the rules concerning Pawn moves. 7

The Queen, Q: Reference is made to FIG. 10. The Queen 16 moves in any direction for any number of, squares from its square but in only one direction for any particular move. Since each rank, excepting the ranks where certainsquares are deleted in the intermediate files, is continuous to form a circular band, the Queen when moving laterally moves in a circular. are

17. In Game Type A, the Queen may not move onto the protected rank one 11 except on the exchange of an advanced Pawn for a captured Queen.

The Pawn, P: Reference is made to FIG. 11. On its.

initial move, the Pawn 18 may move two squares from its square with subsequent moves of one square only. The Pawn 19 may move forward or laterally with the initial lateral move determining the direction of lateral movement 20 that must be maintained throughout the life of the Pawn. In Game Type A, the Pawn may not move onto protected rank one 11 until his King has advanced onto the protected area 11 and 12. The Pawn is then exchanged for any captured chesspiece, the exchange taking place on the square" occupied by the exchanged Pawn 21. The exchanged chesspiece occupies that same square" until moved from protected rank one 11 and may capture an opposing Pawn or chesspiece on the leaving move. Only Kings and Pawns may advance onto rank one in Game Type A. In Game Type A, each player, at his turn, must move two chess- ,men of which one must be a Pawn. Only when the.

player has no Pawn move does he move only one chessman. An alternate method of play is for each player to move only one chessman at each turn.

The Bishop, B: Reference is made to FIG.'I2. The Bishop 22 moves on a diagonal line any number of squares from its square and .always on squares of the'same color as the one from which itinitially moved. In Game Type A the Bishop may not mdve onto the protected rank one 11 except in the instance of the exchange of a Pawn for a captured Bishop.

The Rook, R: Reference is made to FIG. 13. The Rook 23 moves from its square radially along a file or laterally in an are along a rank for any number, of

clear "squaresf In Game Type A, the Rock may not move onto the protected rank one 11 except in the instance of the exchange of a Pawn for a captured Rook- The Knight, Kn: Reference is made to FIG. 14. .A Knights move is made up of two different steps. Knight 24 moves from its square" one square" radially or laterally and one step'diagonally away from the a plurality of chessboards of conventional pattern,

each of which contains eight discrete spaces of alternating color on a side providing eight ranks and eight files (64 alternately colored smaller areas comprising the total area of a chess board), and

additional file areas with files providing an added checkered are'a separating said chess boards, each of which contains one or a plurality of files of alternating colored squares which adjoin said chess boards, one to the other, to provide a continuous playing area whereon the pieces of opposing players can be moved within the boundaries of each conventional pattern chess board between the added files, or moved across the added files, to provide a continuous playing area.

2. The game board apparatus of claim 1 wherein the chess boards of conventional pattern comprise an odd number of chess boards with each separating file area comprising files provided with alternately colored squares in ranks numbered one through six (inside to outside of board), ranks seven and eight being deleted.

3. The game board apparatus of claim 1 wherein the chess boards of conventional pattern comprise an even number of chess boards with each separating file area comprising files provided with alternately colored squares in ranks numbered one through six (inside to outside of board), ranks seven and eight being deleted.

4. The game board apparatus of claim 2 wherein the separating file area provides a single file.

5. The game board apparatus of claim 3 wherein the separating file area provides a single file.

6. The game board apparatus of claim 2 wherein the separating file area provides a double file.

7. The game board apparatus of claim 3 wherein the separating file area provides a double file.

8. The game board apparatus of claim 2 wherein the separating file area provides an odd number of files.

9. The game board apparatus of claim 3 wherein the separating file area provides an odd number of files.

10. The game board apparatus of claim 2 wherein the separating file area provides an even number of files.

11. The game board apparatus of claim 3 wherein the separating file area provides an even number of files.

12. The game board apparatus of claim 1 wherein the chess boards of conventional pattern comprise an odd number of chess boards with each separating file area comprising files provided with alternately colored squares in ranks numbered three through six (inside to outside of board), ranks one and two and ranks seven and eight being deleted.

13. The game board apparatus of claim 1 wherein the chess boards of conventional pattern comprise an even number of chess boards with each separating file area comprising files provided with alternately colored squares in ranks numbered three through six (inside to outside of board), ranks one and two and ranks seven and eight being deleted.

14. The game board apparatus of claim 12 wherein the separating file area provides a single file.

15. The game board apparatus of claim 13 wherein the separating file area provides a single file.

16. The game board apparatus of claim 12 wherein the separating file area provides a double file.

17. The game board apparatus of claim 13 wherein the separating file area provides a double file.

18. The game board apparatus of claim 12 wherein the separating file area provides an odd number of files.

19. The game board apparatus of claim 13 wherein the separating file area provides an odd number of files.

20. The game board apparatus of claim 12 wherein the separating file area provides an even number of files.

21. The game board apparatus of claim 13 wherein the separating file area provides an even number of files.

22. The game board apparatus of claim I wherein the chess boards of conventional pattern comprise an odd number of chess boards with each separating file area comprising files provided with alternately colored squares in ranks one through eight (inside to outside of board), all ranks included.

23. The game board apparatus of claim 1 wherein the chess boards of conventional pattern comprise an even number of chess boards with each separating file area comprising files provided with alternately colored squares in ranks one through eight (inside to outside of board), all ranks included.

24. The game board apparatus of claim 22 wherein the separating file area provides a single file. I

25. The game board apparatus of claim 23 wherein the separating file area provides a single file.

26. The game board apparatus of claim 22 wherein the separating file area provides a double file.

27. The game board apparatus of claim 23 wherein the separating file area provides a doble file.

28. The game board apparatus of claim 22 wherein the separating file area provides an odd number of files.

29. The game board apparatus of claim 23 wherein the separating file area provides an odd number of files.

30. The game board apparatus of claim 22 wherein the separating file area provides an even number of files.

'31. The game board apparatus of claim 23 wherein the separating file area provides an even number of files";

Patent Citations
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US3610626 *Aug 22, 1968Oct 5, 1971Lawrence H NolteChesslike game
US3776554 *Dec 8, 1971Dec 4, 1973F CapablancaCircular playing surface having coded indicia
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4249741 *Sep 5, 1978Feb 10, 1981Uitgeverij Van der LakenBoard for three player draughts and the like
US4322085 *May 21, 1980Mar 30, 1982Stallard Steven MCircular chess game
US4534565 *Jun 28, 1984Aug 13, 1985Hube Lawrence DMulti-level board game
US4553756 *Aug 12, 1983Nov 19, 1985Linnekin Robert LCircular chess
US4688802 *Oct 10, 1984Aug 25, 1987Sandifer John WBoard game
US4804191 *Jul 13, 1987Feb 14, 1989Tankersley Steven EMethod of playing quad-radial chess
US4886279 *Sep 15, 1988Dec 12, 1989Taylor William ACircular chess/checkers board method of play
US4949977 *Feb 10, 1989Aug 21, 1990Smith Michael JGame with table top and wall supported game boards
US4988109 *Jan 12, 1989Jan 29, 1991Li Shuo Yen RQuick-set domino arrangements including two-person domino challenge game
US4991856 *Jul 11, 1989Feb 12, 1991Curtis HoerbeltCircular chess game board
US6592123 *Jul 24, 2000Jul 15, 2003Alan Roy MattlageCircular chess system
US6679494 *Dec 14, 2001Jan 20, 2004Joseph P. ScovelCheckerboard cookie package game
US7156395 *Mar 14, 2006Jan 2, 2007Juan Rosado-GalarzaTable game
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/261, 273/284
International ClassificationA63F3/02
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/00176
European ClassificationA63F3/00B1