Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3917278 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 4, 1975
Filing dateSep 16, 1974
Priority dateSep 16, 1974
Publication numberUS 3917278 A, US 3917278A, US-A-3917278, US3917278 A, US3917278A
InventorsJr Douglas E Steinman
Original AssigneeJr Douglas E Steinman
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf training apparatus
US 3917278 A
Abstract
A convex mirror is adjustably supported by a tripod adjacent a golf ball during the golf club swing. The mirror is so adjusted that (1) a horizontal line on the mirror coincides with the reflected image of the golfer's shoulders and is aimed in the direction of ball flight desired and (2) a vertical line on the mirror coincides with the axis of rotation of the golfer's body. This apparatus permits a golfer to observe and visually determine whether a golf clubhead is moving in a proper plane during the golfer's swing while also permitting observation by the golfer of the center of rotation of the golfer's swing.
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Steinman, Jr. [45] Nov, 4, 1975 GOLF TRAINING APPARATUS 3,110,495 11/1963 Carter 273/35 A [76] Inventor: Douglas E. Steinman, Jr., 850

Petroleum Bldg. Beaumont Tex. Pnmary Exammer George Marlo 77701 Attorney, Agent, or FirmPravel & Wilson PP 506,283 A convex mirror is adjustably supported by a tripod adjacent a golf ball during the golf club swing. The [52] CL 273/183 273/35 273/187 mirror is so adjusted that (1) a horizontal line on the 248/l68 248/472 mirror coincides with the reflected image of the golf- 51 1111.01? A63B 69/36 Shcmlders and is aimed in direcfim Of 58 Field of Search 273/133 35 32 187- flight desired and (2) a vmiml line on the mirror 5 incides with the axis of rotation of the golfers body. This apparatus permits a golfer to observe and visually [56] References Cited determine whether a golf clubhead is moving in a proper plane during the golfers swing while also per- UNITED STATES PATENTS mitting observation by the golfer of the center of rota- 1,091,186 3/1914 Brown 273/183 E X {i f th lf Swing 1,410,811 3/1922 Lewis 273/35 A 1,558,762 10/1925 Richter 273/35 A 3 Claims, 9 Drawing Figures US. Patent Nov. 4, 1975 Sheet 1 of2 3,917,278

US. Patent Nov. 4, 1975 Sheet2of2 3,917,278

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT In the drawings, the letter A designates generally the The present invention relates to a golf training appaapparatus of h Present invention for a g a golfer ratus.

It is generally thought for a golf club to move a golf ball along a desired or intended line to a target, the head of a golf club first must strike the golf ball while traveling in a curved path at a point tangential to the desired line, and second the plane of the clubhead must be normal to the vertical plane of intended flight. The second requirement is generally met by maintaining a proper grip on the golf club throughout the swing The first requirement is best achieved by maintaining the clubhead in a proper plane through the swing.

Failure to maintain the clubhead in the proper plane through the swing has generally resulted from either starting the clubhead in motion in an improper plane, or from movement, either lateral or vertical, of the center of rotation of the golfers swing due to the effort of the backswing.

While certain prior art patents, such as U.S. Pat. Nos. 1,410,811; 3,000,261; 3,110,495; 3,468,545; 3,524,650; 3,540,735 and 3,622,159 have permitted a golfer to observe the swing of the golf club, so far as is known, no apparatus has been provided in the prior art to permit a golfer to directly observe both clubhead motion and body movement during a golf swing.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Briefly, the present invention provides a new and improved apparatus for training a golfer in proper movement of swinging a golf club by permitting the golfer to observe motion of the clubhead, and body movement of the golfer during the golf swing. A reflective means reflects the golfers image to the golfer during the swing while also permitting the golfer to observe clubhead motion during the swing. The reflective means is supported by a support means in a position where the golfer may observe movement of the clubhead and the golfers body during the swing. With the apparatus of the present invention, a golfer thus is permitted to observe and control, while making a golf swing, both motion of the clubhead and movement of the golfers body.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a new and improved golf training apparatus.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. I is an isometric view of the apparatus of the present invention;

FIGS. 2 and 3 are enlarged detail views of circled portions of the apparatus of FIG. 1 designated by circles 2 and 3, respectively;

FIG. 3A is an isometric view of a rear portion of the to take a proper swing at a golf ball B while swinging a golf club C by permitting the golfer to directly observe both the motion of a clubhead H and movement of the golfers body during the swing.

As has been set forth, failure to maintain the clubhead H in the proper plane through a golf swing has generally in the past resulted from either starting the clubhead H in motion in animproper plane, or from movement (whether lateral or vertical) of the center of rotation of the golfers swing during the swing, for example, due to excessive effort during the swing. With the appparatus of the present invention, a golfer receives training in the proper movement for swinging a golf club C. As will be set forth below, the apparatus A permits the golfer to observe motion of the clubhead H, as well as body movement of the golfers body, during the golf swing so that undesirable movement of the clubhead or of the golfers body may be observed and corrective action taken. In addition, the apparatus A permits the golfer to take a normal golf swing simultaneously while making these observations. Thus, the golfer can obtain through practice a sense or feel of the proper position and body movement involved in a proper swing l Considering the apparatus A more in detail, areflective mirror M reflects the golfers image to the golfer during the swing. The mirror M has avconvex reflective surface 10 formed thereon including a central reflecting portion 12 (FIG. 4A) and an outer peripheral reflecting portion 14. The central portion 12 of the reflective surface 10 of the mirror M reflects the image of the golfer (FIGS. 4A and 5A) when in proper position, while the outer reflective portion 14 permits observation of the clubhead H during the swing (FIG. 5A). 7

A vertical guide V is formed on the surface 10 of the mirror M by painting, etching or other suitable techniques. The vertical guide V defines the proper axis of rotation of the golfers body and torso during the swing, when the golfer is in proper position for the swing.

A plane guide P is formed on the surface 10 of the mirror M by painting, etching or other suitable techniques to define the proper plane of movement of the clubhead H during the swing. As is generally taught, a proper swing at the golf ball takes place when the clubhead H strikes the ball B when moving in a circular path tangential to a desired line of Travel T (FIGS. 4 and.5) for the ball B. For the proper swing to occur, movement of the clubhead H during the swing of the club C must define a circular path which is substantially in-the same plane throughout the swing, as indicated by a phantom line 16 ,(FIG. 6).

With the apparatusA, the plane guide P is formed on the surface 10 of, the mirror M so that the golfer may assume a normal stance with proper foot spacing and foot alignment for travel of the ball B along the line T. When the golfer is in the proper position with respect .to the ball B in this manner, the position of the mirror shoulders (FIGS. 4A and 5A). Thus, if the golfer is making a proper swing of the club C, keeping the clubhead H in substantially the same plane as that indicated by the phantom line 16 throughout the swing, the image of the clubhead H in the mirror M does not depart from the line formed by the plane guide P on the surface of the mirror M during the swing.

The mirror M has parallel support attachment tabs 18 and 20 formed, extendingoutwardly from a rear surface 22 (FIG. 3A) thereof. A wing nut 24 is mounted with a bolt which passes through suitable openings formed in the support attachment tabs 18 and 20 and in a lower end portion 28 of a support rod R.

The connection formed by the wing nut 24 between the lower end 28 of the support rod R and the connecting tabs 18 and 20 permits the mirror M to remain in a substantially stationary position once it has been moved to a desired position. However, the connection formed by wing nut 24 between the support rod R and the connecting tabs 18 and 20 is also a releasable one, permitting movement of the mirror M with respect to the support rod R so that the relative positions of the mirror M and the support rod R may be adjusted, permitting the plane guide P on the surface of the mirror M to be moved to coincide with the desired line of travel T of the golf ball B and with the image of the golfers shoulders when the golfer is in proper position to swing, as has been set forth. Further, the adjustable position of mirror M with respect to support rod R permits adjustments for various users and various swings.

The support rod R is mounted at an upper end 30 to a yoke Y by a wing nut 32 which engages a bolt 34 passing through suitable openings formed in the upper end 30 of the support rod R (FIG. 2). The wing nut 32 is releasable and also permits the position of the support rod R and mirror M to be adjusted for various users and for various types of golf swings.

The yoke Y is a flat strip of metal or other suitable material bent or otherwise suitable formed into a generally cruciform or X-shaped configuration (FIG. 2), having attachment tabs 34 and 36 formed spaced from each other to form a slot for receipt of the upper end 30 of the support rod R.

Plural receiving slots 38 are formed by three generally U-shaped folds 40, 42 and 44, in the portion of the yoke Y extending between the attachment tabs 34 and 36. Suitable openings are formed in opposite sides of the folds 40, 42 and 44 so that bolts, rivets, pins or other suitable releasable mounting means may be inserted therein to attach support legs L within the receiving slots 38 of the yoke Y at upper ends of such support legs L.

The support legs L are adjustable in position with respect to the yoke Y to permit further movement and adjustment of the position of the apparatus A to the desired position. The support legs L and the yoke Y serve as a tripod for supporting the support rod R and the mirror M at a desired position adjacent to ball B (FIG. 4) so that the plane guide P is aligned with the desired line of travel T for the ball B when struck by the clubhead H. It should be understood that other supports, such as frames, posts, stakes and the like, or other adjustable supports, may be used to support the mirror M in the desired position, as well.

In the operation and use of the apparatus A, the user mounts the apparatus A on a suitable surface by means of the support legs L and the yoke Y forming a tripod support for the support rod R. The apparatus A may be used at an outdoor or indoor driving range or at any other suitable location.

The user of the apparatus A assumes a normal stance for a golf swing withproper foot position, and the position of the mirror M is adjusted by the user or others until the" vertical guide V coincides with the image of the center line of the golfers swing and the plane guide P is aligned with the desired or intended line of flight T of the ball B and with the image of the users shoulders in the mirror M. It is to be noted that with the apparatus A, the mirror M is sufficiently spaced upwardly from the ball B (FIG. 6) so that the apparatus A does not interfere with movement of the clubhead H or the club C during the user golfers swing.

The user is then in position for a swing, with the reflection of the upper surface of the golfers shoulders coincident with the plane guide P, and the reflection of the center line of the golfers torso coincident with the vertical guide- V. The user golfer then takes a normal.

golf swing with the golf club C, while focusing attention on the mirror M, so that any swaying or jerking movement or other undesirable movement of the center line of the golfers swing, the vertical center line of the torso, can be observed. By so observing, the golfer may thus detect and control-undesirable body movement during the golf swing.

Further, with the convex reflective surface of the mirror M, and the plane guide P formed thereon, the

golfer by focusing attention on the mirror M during the swing in order to observe any torso or body movement may also observethe plane defined by the path of travel of the clubhead H during the swing of the club (FIG. 5A). If the golfer is making the proper swing, the plane of the clubhead travel path will coincide with the plane defined by the plane guide P on the mirror M during the backswing. By keeping attention focused on the image shown in the mirror M, the user golfer may thus observe. any unwanted movement of the clubhead H away from the desired plane during the swing so that appropriate changes can be made to the golfers swing for corrective purposes to maintain the clubhead H in the proper plane during the swing. i

It should further be noted that the apparatus A of the present invention may be used indoors by golfers during inclement weather for practice of their golf swing. Further, the practice swings, whether indoor or outdoor, can take place without requiring that the golfer hit a golf ball during 'the swing, since the plane guide P and the vertical guide V define the proper position for controlled movement of the golfers body and the clubhead H during the proper golf swing. Accordingly, a golfer is permitted to insure that the center of rotation of the, swing is maintained in the proper position throughout the swing, and additionally, that the clubhead H is maintained in the proper plane during the swing without being required to wait until after the swing to notice,.or be notified of, the defect.

Further, a golfer may practice golf swings with the apparatus A, without being required to assume any unnatural or unnormal position for taking the swing in order to observe body or clubhead movement during the swing. Another additional advantage ofthe present invention is obtained by forcing the golfer to focus attention on the mirror M at its location adjacent the ball during the swing, thereby requiring the golfer to maintain proper stationary head position looking downwardly at the ball during the swing.

The foregoing disclosure and description of the invention are illustrative and explanatory thereof, and various changes in the size, shape, and material as well as in the details of the illustrated construction may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention.

I claim:

1. An apparatus for training a golfer in proper move ment of swinging a golf club in order to cause movement of a golf ball along a desired path of travel by permitting the golfer to observe motion of the clubhead and body movement during a golf swing, comprising:

a. means for reflecting the golfers image to the golfer during the swing, said means for reflecting comprising:

1. a mirror having a convex reflective surface, said mirror reflecting the golfers image on a central portion thereof when the golfer is in a proper position for a golf swing and further permitting observation of clubhead movement during the swing; and

2. a plane guide formed on said mirror providing a reference for alignment of the golfers upper body and the desired path of travel of the golf ball for thereby defining the proper plane of movement of the clubhead during the swing; and

b. means for mounting said means for reflecting in a position for observation by the golfer in said mirror of movement of the clubhead and movement of the golfers body during the golf swing; and

0. means for adjusting the position of said mirror with respect to said means for mounting to align said plane guide on said mirror with the desired path of travel of the golf ballwherein the golfer may assume a proper golf'static'e and observe clubhead movement and movement of the golfers body during the swing.

2. The structure of claim 1, wherein said means for reflecting further includes:

a vertical guide formed on said mirror providing a reference line for alignment with the center line of the torso of the golfer for thereby defining the proper axis of rotation of the golfers body during the swing.

3. The structure of claim 1, wherein said means for mounting comprises:

a support rod supporting said mirror in position for observation by the golfer of movement of the clubhead and the golfers body during .the swing;

a yoke mounting said support rod in position; and

means for supporting said yoke and said support rod on a surface on which the golfer is practicing.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1091186 *Jun 27, 1913Mar 24, 1914William Hiram BrownGolf-stroke teacher.
US1410811 *Oct 19, 1921Mar 28, 1922Lewis Arthur Henry HollidaySelf-instructor for games
US1558762 *Jun 10, 1925Oct 27, 1925Richter BenjaminInstruction device
US3110495 *Aug 4, 1960Nov 12, 1963Sidney T CarterMirror system for golf analysis
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4143877 *Jun 6, 1977Mar 13, 1979Jeffries Alfred JGolfer's training device
US4181307 *May 31, 1978Jan 1, 1980Campbell William TGolf training device
US4383687 *Nov 30, 1981May 17, 1983Claude WolffReflecting device for golf training or any other sport using a ball striking staff
US4817954 *Oct 1, 1987Apr 4, 1989Kubo Gerald GGolf swing training device
US5037303 *Sep 22, 1989Aug 6, 1991Irwin Jack LSki training mirror method and apparatus
US5486003 *Sep 9, 1992Jan 23, 1996Loew; Ellen G.Golf training system
US5505445 *Apr 21, 1995Apr 9, 1996Treadwell; DavidFootball kicking tee
US5842931 *Feb 12, 1997Dec 1, 1998Payne; Edward D.Mirrored headgear sports training system
US6042231 *Jul 29, 1997Mar 28, 2000Vega Vista, Inc.Methods and systems for relieving eye strain
US6076928 *Jun 15, 1998Jun 20, 2000Fateh; SinaIdeal visual ergonomic system for computer users
US6244711Jan 4, 2000Jun 12, 2001Vega Vista, Inc.Ergonomic systems and methods for operating computers
US6345893Dec 12, 2000Feb 12, 2002Vega Vista, Inc.Ergonomic systems and methods for operating computers
US6364485May 12, 1999Apr 2, 2002Vega Vista, Inc.Methods and systems for relieving eye strain
US7153217 *Oct 4, 2004Dec 26, 2006Florian Raymond JGolf swing training apparatus
US7651405 *Nov 3, 2008Jan 26, 2010Travis LynchDevice for visualizing and practicing a correct golf swing
US7815517 *Jun 22, 2009Oct 19, 2010Lou SardoMirrored feedback system for revealing head movement during golfer's backswing
US7985145 *Sep 4, 2009Jul 26, 2011James ChuPortable sports swing feedback apparatus
US8684858 *Aug 7, 2012Apr 1, 2014Vladimir GribovskyPutting training aid
WO1985000295A1 *Jul 12, 1984Jan 31, 1985Hakan KronogardGolf swing training device
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/267, 248/168, 248/472
International ClassificationA63B69/00, A63B69/36
Cooperative ClassificationA63B69/3623, A63B24/0003, A63B2225/12
European ClassificationA63B69/36D, A63B24/00A