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Publication numberUS3917454 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 4, 1975
Filing dateJul 22, 1974
Priority dateJul 22, 1974
Publication numberUS 3917454 A, US 3917454A, US-A-3917454, US3917454 A, US3917454A
InventorsClark Gary E
Original AssigneeSun Electric Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Exhaust emission analysis method
US 3917454 A
Abstract
Method of analyzing the exhaust from an internal combustion engine that is fitted with a conventional exhaust pipe. The method utilizes an analyzer capable of indicating the concentration of at least one component of the exhaust which is transmitted to the analyzer through a conduit. The preferred form of the method includes the steps of heating the air inside the conduit while the conduit is not being used for exhaust analysis and transmitting the heated air into the analyzer. When engine exhaust is to be analyzed, the conduit is placed adjacent the exhaust pipe and the exhaust is transmitted from the tail pipe through the conduit into the analyzer so that the concentration of at least one component of the exhaust is indicated. The heating of the air inside the conduit prevents condensation of moisture in the conduit and the transfer of moisture to the analyzer, thereby enhancing the accuracy of the analysis.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

' United States Patent 191 Clark Nov. 4, 1975 1 22 Filed:

[ EXHAUST EMISSION ANALYSIS METHOD [75] Inventor: Gary E. Clark, Chicago, Ill.

[73] Assignee: Sun Electric Corporation, Chicago,

Ill.

July 22, 1974 21 Appl. No.: 490,673

23/254 E, 255 R, 255 E, 230 PC, 253 PC; 73/23 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,284,165 1 1/1966 Baumann et al. 23/255 E 3,593,023 7/1971 Dodson 23/232 R Primary Examiner-R. E. Berwin Attorney, Agent, or FirmMolinare, Allegretti, Newitt & Witcoff [57] ABSTRACT Method of analyzing the exhaust from an internal combustion engine that is fitted with a conventional exhaust pipe. The method utilizes an analyzer capable of indicating the concentration of at least one component of the exhaust which is transmitted to the analyzer through a conduit. The preferred form of the method includes the steps of heating the air inside the conduit while the conduit is not being used for exhaust analysis and transmitting the heated air into the analyzer. When engine exhaust is to be analyzed, the conduit is placed adjacent the exhaust pipe and the exhaust is transmitted from the tail pipe through the conduit into the analyzer so that the concentration of at least one component of the exhaust is indicated.

The heating of the air inside the conduit prevents condensation of moisture in the conduit and the transfer of moisture to the analyzer, thereby enhancing the accuracy of the analysis.

5 Claims, 2 Drawing Figures US. Patent Nov. 4, 1975 EXHAUST EMISSION ANALYZ E R SUCT/ON PUMP u a m S s A R m m 1 EXHAUST EMISSION ANALYSIS METHOD BACKGROUND AND SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to exhaust emission analyzers A variety of exhaust emission analyzers capable of indicating the concentration of at least one component ;of exhaust from. an internal combustion engine have been designed in the past. These analyzers typically provide for the optical scanning of exhaust gases which are transmitted to the analyzer through a conduit from the tail pipeof the engine being tested. 1

Serious problems have arisen when such analyzers are used out of doors in temperatures below 32 F. In such an environment, the accuracy of the analyzer becomes erratic and unreliable. The applicant has discovered that this condition can be corrected by preheating the air in the conduit while it is not being used for exhaust analysis. Heated air inside the conduit is transmitted to the analyzer, thereby maintaining the volume and moisture content of the air in proper balance. When an engine is to be analyzed, the conduit is placed adjacent the exhaust pipe, and the exhaust gases are transmitted through the conduit into the analyzer.

By preheating the air inside the conduit and transmitting the preheated air into the analyzer, the applicant has been able to maintain accurate and reliable exhaust pollutant concentration, readings .in below ,freezing weather, thereby increasing the environmental conditions under which the analyzer can be used to advantage.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING These and other advantages and features of the present invention will appear in connection with the accompanying drawing wherein:

FIG. 1 is a schematic illustration of a preferred form of the present invention used in connection with a conventional vehicle; and

FIG. 2 is an enlarged, fragmentary, isometric view of the heater assembly shown in FIG. 1.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring to FIG. 1, a preferred embodiment of the present invention can be used in connection with a conventional motor vehicle having an internal combustion engine 12 fitted with a tail pipe 14. The exhaust created by the engine and expelled by the tail pipe can be analyzed by a conventional analyzer, such as an exhaust emission analyzer l6 sold by Sun Electric Corporation, Chicago, Illinois.

Exhaust from engine 12 is transmitted to the analyzer through a conduit 18 comprising a hollow cylindrical metal probe 20 that is connected to a hollow hose 22. A stop member 23 prevents probe 20 from being pushed too far into tail pipe 14.

A suction pump 24 pulls exhaust gases or air through conduit 18 and a filter assembly 25 into analyzer 16. The filter assembly comprises a two-step filter which. removes excess moisture and particles from the gases transmitted through hose 22. By well known optical techniques, analyzer 16 indicates the concentration of 'one or more pollutants in the exhaust gases, such as hydrocarbons or nitrogen oxides. The concentration is indicated on meters 26 and 27.

I In order to allow the use of analyzer 16 in subfreezing weather, a heater assembly 30 is provided. Referring to FIG. 2, assembly 30 comprises a base 31 that is supported by metal feet 33 and 34. Probe 20 is adapted to fit inside a duct assembly 36 comprising an inner duct 38that is separated from an outer duct 42 by a layer of high temperature refractory insulation 40. Air is admitted to inner duct 38 through a cover assembly 44comprising an outer cover 46 and an inner panel 48 that are separated by another layer'of high temperature refractory insulation 50. Air is admitted to cover assembly 44 through a perforated rear panel 52. When probe 20 is in place, it lies above a conventional strip heatin'g element 54 that is positioned below a heat sink 56. The heat sink evenly distributes the heat gener ated by element 54 over the entire length of probe 20. Heating element 54 is a strip type heater rated at 300-550 watts that receives electrical power through an AC power cord 58 from a source (not shown).

In order to use the apparatus to advantage, probe 20 is placed inside duct assembly 36 at all times when the probe is not positioned inside tail pipe 14. As shown in the drawing, probe 20 is placed inside inner duct 38 and above heat sink 56 so that the heat from element 54 heats the air inside probe 20. Suction pump 24 pulls the heated air through hose 22 into the analyzer, thereby preventing the formation of moisture inside the ....entire length of probe 20. and hose 22 Rreferabbl.,. the H heat supplied by element 54 is sufficient to prevent the condensation of moisture insidle probe 20 and hose 22, or to evaporate any moisture or ice which has condensed inside the conduit.

When the exhaust from vehicle 10 is analyzed, probe 20 is removed from heater assembly 30 and is placed into tail pipe 14 in the manner shown in phantom in FIG. 1. At this point in time, suction pump 24 pulls exhaust gases from tail pipe 14 through hose 22 into analyzer 16 so that the concentration of one or more pollutants in the exhaust gases is indicated on meters 26 and 27.

Those skilled in the art will recognize that the embodiment shown herein is merely exemplary of the preferred practice of the invention and may be modified and altered without departing from the true spirit and scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A method of analyzing the exhaust flowing through an exhaust pipe connected to an internal combustion engine by means of an analyzer capable of indicating the concentration of at least one component of the exhaust transmitted to the analyzer through a conduit comprising a probe adapted to fit into the exhaust pipe and a hose connected between the probe and the analyzer, said method comprising the steps of:

heating the air inside the probe;

transmitting the heated air through the hose into the analyzer, so that the entire length of the conduit is exposed to the heated air;

placing the probe adjacent the exhaust pipe; and

transmitting the exhaust from the tail pipe through the conduit into the analyzer, whereby the heating of the air inside the entire length of the conduit prevents the condensation of moisture in the conduit, thereby increasing the accuracy of the analyzer.

2. A method, as claimed in claim 1, wherein the step of heating the air inside the probe comprises the step of heating the probe so that the temperature of the air inside the probe increases.

3. A method, as claimed in claim 1, wherein the step of heating theair inside the probe comprises the step of evaporating any moisture condensed on the probe.

4. A method of analyzing the exhaust flowing through an exhaust pipe connected to an internal combustion engine by means of an analyzer located adjacent a heater unit and capable of indicating the concentration of at least one component of exhaust transmitted to the analyzer through a conduit comprising a probe adapted to fit into the exhaust pipe and a hose connected between the prbe and the analyzer, said method comprising the steps of:

placing'the probe adjacent the heaterunit so that the air inside the probe is raised to at least a predetermined temperature;

transmitting the heated air through the hose into the analyzer so that the entire length of the conduit is exposed to the heated air;

removing the probe from the heater unit;

- placing the probe adjacent the exhaust pipe; and

transmitting the exhaust from the tail pipe through the conduitinto the analyzer, whereby the heating of the entire length of the conduit prevents condensation of moisture in the conduit, thereby increasing the accuracy of the analyzer.

5. A method, as claimed in claim 4, wherein the predetermined temperature is sufficiently great to evaporate condensed vapor in the entire length of the conduit.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3284165 *Sep 11, 1964Nov 8, 1966Bosch Gmbh RobertElectrical measuring device for the analysis of exhaust gases of internal combustionengines
US3593023 *Mar 27, 1969Jul 13, 1971Beckman Instruments IncApparatus and method for exhaust analysis
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4148211 *Mar 22, 1978Apr 10, 1979Beckman Instruments, Inc.Sampling system for engine exhaust gas analysis apparatus
US4373377 *Oct 27, 1980Feb 15, 1983United Technologies CorporationUniversal tail pipe connector
US4657744 *Jul 2, 1985Apr 14, 1987Sensors, Inc.Chemiluminescent gas analyzer for measuring the oxides of nitrogen
US4684509 *Jul 16, 1985Aug 4, 1987Tibor BernathApparatus for measuring gas concentrations in a hot gas sample withdrawn from a process chamber
US4757718 *Mar 23, 1987Jul 19, 1988Borg-Warner Automotive, Inc.De-icer for a transducer assembly
US4822564 *Feb 6, 1987Apr 18, 1989Sensors, Inc.Chemiluminescent gas analyzer for measuring the oxides of nitrogen
US4924095 *Nov 23, 1988May 8, 1990West Lodge ResearchRemote gas analyzer for motor vehicle exhaust emissions surveillance
US5105651 *Jul 17, 1990Apr 21, 1992Gutmann Messtechnik AgMethod of and apparatus for analyzing exhaust gases of motor vehicles
US5109711 *Apr 2, 1990May 5, 1992Fag Kugelfischer Georg SchaferProbe for sampling particulates in gases from flues
US5410907 *Aug 25, 1993May 2, 1995White Consolidated Ind IncGas sampling method and dilution tunnel therefor
US5589629 *Apr 25, 1995Dec 31, 1996Quinn; Stephen J.Method and apparatus for testing vehicle exhaust emissions
US5693872 *Sep 17, 1996Dec 2, 1997Quinn; Stephen JosephMethod and apparatus for testing preconditioned vehicle exhaust emission
US5907109 *May 5, 1998May 25, 1999Tedeschi; Rinaldo R.Vehicle emission sampling probe apparatus
US5993743 *Mar 26, 1997Nov 30, 1999Spx CorporationHand-held vehicle exhaust analyzer
US6021253 *Jun 12, 1997Feb 1, 2000Beckman Coulter, Inc.Heating probe
US6151952 *Oct 26, 1998Nov 28, 2000California Analytical Instruments, Inc.System for mass emission sampling of combustion products
US6287519Oct 20, 1999Sep 11, 2001Spx CorporationHand-held vehicle exhaust analyzer
US6878339 *Feb 19, 2003Apr 12, 2005Horiba, Ltd.NOx-concentration measuring apparatus
US7946160 *Oct 9, 2008May 24, 2011GM Global Technology Operations LLCPortable emissions measurement adapter device
US9116138 *Nov 7, 2012Aug 25, 2015Horiba, Ltd.Exhaust gas analysis system and program for this system
US20030156982 *Feb 19, 2003Aug 21, 2003Horiba, Ltd.NOx-concentration measuring apparatus
US20100089138 *Oct 9, 2008Apr 15, 2010Gm Global Technology Operations, Inc.Portable Emissions Measurement Adapter Device
US20130118244 *May 16, 2013Horiba, Ltd.Exhaust Gas Analysis System and Program for this System
CN103105460A *Nov 7, 2012May 15, 2013株式会社堀场制作所Exhaust gas analysis system
DE2921417A1 *May 26, 1979Nov 27, 1980Daimler Benz AgAuspuffanschlusstueck fuer abgasmessungen
Classifications
U.S. Classification73/863.11, 436/181, 73/23.31, 436/116, 73/864.73, 422/83
International ClassificationG01M15/04, G01M15/10, G01N33/00
Cooperative ClassificationG01M15/102, G01N33/0011
European ClassificationG01N33/00D2A, G01M15/10E
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Aug 10, 1992ASAssignment
Owner name: FOOTHILL CAPITAL CORPORATION A CA CORP., CALIFORN
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:SUN ELECTRIC CORPORATION A DE CORP.;REEL/FRAME:006225/0658
Effective date: 19920724
Aug 10, 1992AS06Security interest
Owner name: FOOTHILL CAPITAL CORPORATION A CA CORP. 11111 SANT
Owner name: SUN ELECTRIC CORPORATION A DE CORP.
Effective date: 19920724
Jul 27, 1992AS06Security interest
Owner name: HARRIS TRUST AND SAVINGS BANK AN IL CORP. POST OFF
Effective date: 19920724
Owner name: SUN ELECTRIC CORPORATION, A CORP. OF DE
Jul 27, 1992ASAssignment
Owner name: HARRIS TRUST AND SAVINGS BANK AN IL CORP., ILLINOI
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:SUN ELECTRIC CORPORATION, A CORP. OF DE;REEL/FRAME:006190/0663
Effective date: 19920724