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Publication numberUS3917922 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 4, 1975
Filing dateJun 10, 1974
Priority dateJun 10, 1974
Publication numberUS 3917922 A, US 3917922A, US-A-3917922, US3917922 A, US3917922A
InventorsM Jack Kirsch
Original AssigneeTechnal Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dry mount apparatus
US 3917922 A
Abstract
An improved inexpensive but effective dry mount apparatus is provided for mounting prints or photographs of different size on support boards, which apparatus includes a non-heated flattening roller, a heated platen and a heat-absorbing cooling roller which is thermally insulated from the platen, the flattening roller, platen and cooling roller being supported on a frame for movement across the surface of a photograph being mounted. The flattening roller is employed to initially flatten the photograph before it is bonded to the support board. The platen is employed to apply uniform heat and pressure while melting the adhesive resin of a dry mount tissue and pressing the melted resin into intimate contact with the surfaces being bonded. Cooling and final bonding of the photograph to the support board is effected by means of the cooling roller which maintains all surfaces in firm contact while removing heat therefrom to effect a strong and rigid bond.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1 Kirsch Nov. 4, 1975 DRY MOUNT APPARATUS [75] Inventor: M. Jack Kirsch, Teaneck, NJ. [73] Assignee: Technal Corporation, Englewood,

22 Filed: June 10,1974

21 Appl. No.: 477,696

[52] US. Cl. 219/243; 156/579; 156/583 [51] Int. Cl. HOSB l/00 [58] Field of Search... 156/574, 579, 583, 523-527,

Primary Examiner-Douglas J. Drummond Assistant Examiner-M. G. Wityshyn Attorney, Agent, or Firm--Lerner, David, Littenberg & Samuel [57] ABSTRACT An improved inexpensive but effective dry mount apparatus is provided for mounting prints or photographs of different size on support boards, which apparatus includes a non-heated flattening roller, a heated platen and a heat-absorbing cooling roller which is thermally insulated from the platen, the flattening roller, platen and cooling roller being supported on a frame for movement across the surface of a photograph being mounted. The flattening roller is employed to initially flatten the photograph before it is bonded to the support board. The platen is employed to apply uniform heat and pressure while melting the adhesive resin of a dry mount tissue and pressing the melted resin into intimate contact with the surfaces being bonded. Cooling and final bonding of the photograph to the support board is efiected by means of the cooling roller which maintains all surfaces in firm contact while removing heat therefrom to effect a strong and rigid bond.

6 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures US. Patent Nov. 4, 1975 Sheet 1 of2 3,917,922

F/GZ

US. Patent Nov. 4, 1975 Sheet 2 on 3,917,922

1 DRY MOUNT APPARATUS FIELD OF THE INVENTION This invention relates in general to the mounting of photographs or other prints or pictures, and more particularly to a novel dry mounting device which is relatively small and inexpensive yet extremely effective in operation, for mounting prints of various size, employing a thermal dry mount adhesive, to a planar support board.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Photographs are often mounted on matte boards by a dry mount technique which permits uniform and strong bond of the entire surface to the surface of the support. Such dry mounting is preferred over the use of liquid adhesives since puckering or wrinkling of the surface of the photograph which usually occurs with liquid glue is eliminated. Moreover, the peeling and tearing of the edges of a mounted photograph, which can easily result when mounting is accomplished by means of liquid glue, is avoided by the dry mounting technique.

According to the dry mount technique, a dry mount tissue composed of an oversize sheet of thin paper coated on both sides with a thermoplastic resin or other thermoplastic adhesive such as shellac is first tacked to the rear face of the photograph and trimmed to exactly the dimensions of the photograph and the photograph is hand positioned in the desired place on the support board. The support board with the photograph in proper position thereon is carefully inserted in a dry mount press which generally consists of a pair of large flat plates with pressure means for bringing the plates together to bear upon the support board and photograph. At least one of the mounting press plates contains heating elements effective to raise its temperature sufficient to melt the dry mount tissue resin evenly over the entire surface of the photograph. Upon cooling, the entire photographic surface is uniformly bonded to the mounting board.

Dry mount presses are generally quite expensive and can be rather large especially if the press is to accommodate large-size photographs. The cost and size of such presses has generally limited their use to commercial photofinishing establishments. An individual desiring to dry mount a photograph without the use of the expensive mounting presses described hereinabove must resort to rather crude means such as employing a household flat-iron to dry mount the photograph. Since a flat-iron is generally of smaller area than the print being mounted, and the temperature control of the iron is often not sumciently precise for the purpose, photographs mounted in this manner are often scorched or mounted with an uneven or wrinkled finish. Photographs mounted in this makeshift manner often tear or peel along the edges since improper bonding often occurs around the periphery thereof, and frequently photographs shift from the desired mounted position.

US. Pat. No. 3,621,195 To Goldstein discloses a dry mount apparatus which includes a heated platen pivotally or hingedly mounted to a frame having a handle suitable for moving the platen across a photograph. A heat-absorbing cooling roller which is thermally insulated from theplaten is also mounted on the frame and is'coextensive in length with the platen. In operation, a photograph is prepared for mounting as described above by tacking a dry mount tissue thereto and the platen is heated to the requisite temperature. The dry mount apparatus is drawn or moved over the surface, heated platen first and cooling roller last, to apply pressure across the entire surface of the photograph and effect a strong and uniform bond. The heat and pressure applied via the platen uniformly melts the resin of the dry mount tissue and urges the melted resin in contact with the surfaces to be bonded, while the heat absorbing cooling roller is operative to maintain the bonding surfaces in intimate contact while removing heat therefrom to insure proper adhesion and bond after the device is withdrawn.

Although the dry mount device disclosed in US. Pat. No. 3,621,195 has received favorable acceptance in the industry, it has been found to suffer from drawbacks which somewhat limit its application. Perhaps the primary drawback of such apparatus is the fact that it does not provide means for flattening a photograph to be mounted without heating the same. Thus, for example, where the apparatus is employed to mount a photograph which is initially wrinkled, dog-eared or otherwise worn, the pressure supplied by the heated platen alone may be insufficient to flatten out such photograph before it is permanently bonded to the support board. The result is that when the mounting is completed, the photograph still may well include wrinkles which not only detract from the aesthetic appeal thereof but may also prevent uniform bonding of the photograph to the support board.

Another disadvantage of the dry mount apparatus of US. Pat. No. 3,621,195 is the fact that the platen must be hingedly connected to the frame thereby complicating the design thereof with moving parts without any substantial benefit derived therefrom.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION In accordance with the present invention, a universal dry mounting apparatus is provided which is simple and inexpensive and yet which provides results of a quality achieved previously only by use of complex and expensive mounting presses. Furthermore, the apparatus of the invention overcomes the disadvantages associated with the dry mount apparatus disclosed in US. Pat. No. 3,621,195 in that it includes means for initially flattening a photograph to be mounted before the photograph is in any way bonded to the support board. Furthermore, the apparatus of the invention does not require that the platen be hingedly connected to the frame as in the device in US. Pat. No. 3,621,195, thereby simplifying the design and construction over the apparatus of such patent.

In accordance with the invention, a flattening roller and a heated platen of relatively large area in juxtaposition with heat absorbing means are arranged upon a carrier such that a photograph to be mounted may be initially flattened without being heated. Thereafter heat and pressure may be evenly applied over a large area of the photograph by means of the platen while the heat-absorbing means uniformly withdraws heat from the previously heated photographic surface to achieve uniform and secure attachment. The platen is supported on a frame having a handle suitable for moving the platen across a photograph while the flattening roller and heat-absorbing means also mounted on the frame are preferably in the form of rollers coextensive in length with the platen and mounted in close proximity thereto. The rollers are thermally insulated from the platen and are mounted in relation to the platen such that movement of the device across a mounting surface is accomplished with uniform pressure applied to both the platen and rollers. The portions of the mounting device which confront and contact the photograph are constructed in a smooth and highly finished manner to prevent damage to the photograph as the device is drawn over its surface. Suitable" temperature control means can be provided to adjust the operating temperature of the platen, such control means preferably comprising a thermostat or the like which is employed in contact with the platen. Furthermore, the platen may be hingedly connected to the frame in a manner similar to that disclosed in US. Pat. No. 3,621,195; however, the platen is preferably fixedly connected to the frame thereby simplifying design and construction of the same.

In employing the dry mount device of the invention, a dry mount tissue is tacked to a photograph and suitably trimmed and the photograph is positioned on the matte board and the device is drawn or moved over the surface, flattening roller first, platen second, and cooling roller last to intially flatten the photograph without heating and bonding the same and to apply pressure across the entiresurface of the photograph and effect a strong and uniform bond. The heat and pressure applied via the platen uniformly melts the resin of the dry mount tissue and urges the melted resin in contact with the surface to be bonded while the heat absorbing roller is operative to maintain the bonding surfaces in intimate contact while removing heat therefrom to insure proper adhesion and bonding after the device is withdrawn.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS The invention will be more fully understood from the following description, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a dry mounting device embodying the invention;

FIG. 2 is an elevational view, partly in section, of the device of FIG." 1;

FIG. 3 is a plan view of the device shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a rear elevational view of the dry mount device of FIGS. 1 and 2; and

FIG. 5 is an elevational view, partly in section of another embodiment of a dry mounting device of the invention.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring now to the accompanying Figures wherein like numerals represent like elements in the several views, there is shown in FIGS. 1 to 4 a preferred embodiment of the dry mount apparatus in accordance with the invention. Platen is fixedly supported on a frame 12 by means of screws 17 (shown in FIG. 1) at tening roller 18 is mounted on and journaled for rotation about a front portion 13 of frame 10 as shown. For example, the flattening roller 18 may include a centrally disposed core 19 which may be formed of metal,

such as aluminum, which is surrounded by a flexible protective covering 36 of rubber or other resilient material. Furthermore, the flattening roller may be beatinsulated from the platen 10 as will be apparent to one skilled in the art.

Heat-absorbing roller 24 is heat-insulatingly mounted and journaled for rotation on portion 25 of frame 12 rearwardly of the platen, as shown. Roller 24 includes a core 38 formed of a metal such as aluminum or other suitable material, which may include a flexible protective covering 40 of rubber or similar material.

The frame 12 includes an upper cover 44 which is secured to the remainder of the frame by any suitable conventional fastening means such as machirie screws.

Suitable conventional heating element or strip designated generally by the numeral 46 is positioned above and in contact with platen 10 as shown best in FIGS. 2, 3 and 4 and held against platen 10 by hold down plate 47.

A thermostat 52 is disposed adjacent heating element 46 within the frame 12 in intimate contact with platen 10 as shown in FIGS. 2 to 4. The thermostat is connected to conventional temperature control means indicated generally by the numeral 54 which will be described below.

The temperature control means 54 is employed to operate the heating element 46 and control the same to set the desired temperature of the platen. To this end, the temperature control means 54 may be controlled by means of knob 58 and is designed to be set-at different settings corresponding to platen temperatures desired (for example between 200 and 275 F.) The thermostat 52 operates to sense thetemperature of the platen so that when the desired platen temperature is reached, the thermostat'will automatically cut off or deactivate the heating element. When the thermostat senses that the platen has fallen below the desired temperature, it will cause activation of the heating element to heat the platen to the desired temperature as determined by the setting of the temperature control means 54. Wires 51 areconnected to the heating element 46 and thermostat 52 and extend through the handle 30 and terminate in an electrical cord (not shown for drawing clarity) which is provided with suitable plug means. V I

It will be appreciated that the heating element 46, thermostat 52 and temperature control means 54 as well as the wiring associated therewith are all of conventional construction. 5

A pair of pressure channels 49 preferably in the form of flat springs are attached to the hold down plate 47 by rivets 50 and areheld in tension against the upper cover 44. The pressure channels 49 serve. to hold down and bias the heating element 46, and thermostat 52 against the platen 10 and away from the cover 44.

A handle 30, secured'by machine screws 31 to an angular upright portion 15 which in turn is secured to the upper cover 44 frame by machine screws 31a, provides means for grippingand operating the device. The handle is, comprised of any suitable material of low thermal P conductivity, such as wood or plastic.

A rest bracket 60 which includes insulated sleeve 61 mount apparatus of the invention when not in use in a manner such that heated portions of the device do not contact any surfaces. The handle 30 also includes protective washer 62 which prevents the user from touching heated portions of the device while using the same.

A print is mounted to a support board as follows. To prepare the print for mounting, a dry mount tissue is tacked thereto and the print is positioned on a support board with the tissue contacting the board. In operating the present dry mounting device, it is only necessary to grip the handle 30 and apply a downward and forward pressure to move flattening roller 18 first, then platen and roller 24 thereafter across the face of the print (which preferably is protected by a sheet of paper as per the teachings of US. Pat. No. 3,621,195). The flat tening roller 18 initially flattens and holds down the print; thereafter the thermoplastic resin on the dry mount tissue is melted by the heat from the platen and the print is pressed into uniform and intimate engagement with the support board by roller 24, which is also operative to absorb heat from the print and support board. As the roller 24 passes a given area, the bond is complete and cool, thus preventing separation or wrinkling. Where photographs having dimensions larger then the span of the platen and rollers are being mounted, several overlapping passes of the device will serve to bond the entire surface to the matte or support board.

Turning now to FIG. 5 there is shown an alternative embodiment of the dry mount apparatus of the invention which includes a frame 12a, to which platen 10 is hingedly connected in the manner described in US. Pat. No. 3,621,195. In the FIG. 5 embodiment, a flattening or hold down roller 18 mounted on and journaled for rotation about a front portion 13 of frame 12 as shown. Heat-absorbing roller 24 is heat-insulatingly mounted and joumaled for rotation on portion 25 of frame 12 rearwardly of the platen, as shown.

As in the dry mount apparatus of US. Pat. No. 3,621,195, the platen 10' is fixed securely at the front end thereof to frame 12 by means of screws 16. The platen is also supported within the frame 12 by one screw 20 on each side of the frame, each slidably passing through a respective slot 22. The platen 10' is thus free to pivot about the axis of screws 16, an amount permitted by the length of slot 22. Thus, platen 10' is free to rotate in the direction of arrows 52, although constrained by slot 22.

As will be apparent, platen 10 is adapted to pivot about screw 20 and remain flat while roller 24 is lifted slightly from the surface of the work so that the working face of the platen and the lower edge of the roller 24 define a plane when in contact with a planar surface.

The axes of screws 16 and roller 24 define a plane parallel to the planar work surface.

It will be appreciated that the above-described dry mount apparatus of the invention which includes the hingedly mounted platen may include all of the other features and components described in US. Pat. No. 3,621,195 and in the other embodiment described in detail herebefore. Furthermore, a print may be mounted to a support board in the same manner as described above with respect to the device of FIGS. 1 to 4.

I claim:

1. Apparatus for mounting photographs comprising in combination, a frame, a platen attached to said frame and formed with a flat smooth lower surface having leading and lagging edges, heating means for heating said platen, a cylindrical flattening roller rotatably mounted to said frame in front of said leading edge of said platen, a cylindrical cooling roller rotatably mounted to said frame rearward of said lagging edge of said platen, and handle means attached to said frame for positioning said lower surface of said platen and said flattening roller and said cooling roller into substantially coplanar firm contact with a photograph lying flat for attachment by a thermal dry mount medium to a planar support board and for moving said frame across said photograph with said flattening roller leading said platen and initially flattening said photograph against said planar support board prior to heating said photograph, and with said cooling roller following said heated platen for effecting a thermal bond of said photograph to said support board by first heating and thereafter cooling said photograph, said thermal dry mount medium and said support board.

2. The apparatus in accordance with claim 1 wherein said platen is fixedly mounted to said frame.

3. The apparatus in accordance with claim 2 further including temperature sensing means disposed in said frame in contact with said platen.

4. The apparatus in accordance with claim 1 wherein said platen is hingedly mounted to said frame to permit pivotal movement of said platen.

5. The apparatus in accordance with claim 4 further including temperature sensing means disposed in said frame in contact with said platen.

6. The apparatus in accordance with claim 1 wherein said handle means includes a projecting member for use as a rest stand in supporting said apparatus in conjunction with said flattening roller.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2143424 *Dec 9, 1935Jan 10, 1939Charles W BrugerElectric iron
US2373345 *May 5, 1939Apr 10, 1945Mcgraw Electric CoElectric iron
US3621195 *Oct 2, 1969Nov 16, 1971Phyllis Goldstein KirschnerDry mount apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4744855 *Jun 26, 1986May 17, 1988Pfaff Industriemaschinen GmbhWelding machine for foil webs
US4749433 *Jan 16, 1986Jun 7, 1988Johnston Wayne RMethod of laying carpet to avoid seam peaking and apparatus therefor
US4919743 *Nov 23, 1987Apr 24, 1990Johnston Wayne RMethod of laying carpet to avoid seam peaking and apparatus therefor
Classifications
U.S. Classification219/243, 156/579
International ClassificationH05B3/00, G03D15/04, B29C65/00, B29C65/18
Cooperative ClassificationB29C66/0342, B29C66/861, B29C66/81457, B29C65/18, H05B3/00, B29C66/8362, G03D15/04
European ClassificationB29C66/81457, B29C66/0342, B29C66/861, B29C65/18, B29C66/8362, H05B3/00, G03D15/04