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Publication numberUS3918118 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 11, 1975
Filing dateNov 12, 1974
Priority dateNov 17, 1973
Also published asDE2357467A1, DE2357467B2
Publication numberUS 3918118 A, US 3918118A, US-A-3918118, US3918118 A, US3918118A
InventorsSchalmath Heinz, Vom Berg Hugo
Original AssigneeJungheinrich Unternehmensverw
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sweeping machine
US 3918118 A
Abstract
A downwardly open brush housing is mounted on a wheeled chassis. A cylindrical brush is rotatably mounted in the brush housing. A dirt container is detachably connected to the brush housing. Frame section members extend along the chassis on both sides thereof. carriers are slidably guided in said frame section members in the longitudinal direction thereof. The dirt container is pivotally connected by bearing means to said carriers.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

' United States Patent vom Berg et a].

1 1 Nov. 11, 1975 SWEEPING MACHINE [75] Inventors: Hugo vom Berg, Bad Schwartauj Heinz Schalmath, Bad Oldesloe. both of Germany [73] Assignee: Jungheinrich Unternehmensuerwaltung KG, Hamburg. Germany 22 Filed: Nov. 12.1974

21 App]. No.1 523,041

[30] Foreign Application Priority Data Nov. 17 1973 German 2357-167 [52] US. Cl. 15/83; 15/340 [51] Int. Cl.'- E0111 H04 [58] Field of Search 15/83, 84. 85, 86. 340

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2.689.367 9/1954 Parker 15/83 X 3/1957 Newport 15/340 3.710.413 l/l973 Hollowellw 15/340 3.761.988 10/1973 ()verton 15/83 3.837.157 M197 1 Yonder Lel 15/83 Primary EA'UHII HCI' PCICI' Feldman til/OHM). Agent. or FI'rm- Toren. McGeady and Stangcr [57] ABSTRACT A downwardly open brush housing is mounted on a wheeled chassis. A cylindrical brush is rotatably mounted in the brush housing. A dirt container is detachably connected to the brush housing. Frame section members extend along the chassis on both sides thereof. carriers are slidabl guided in said frame section members in the longitudinal direction thereof. The dirt container is pivotally connected by hearing means to said carriers.

11 Claims. 4 Drawing Figures Sheet 1 of 3 3,918,118

US. Patent Nov. 11, 1 975 U.S. Patent N0v.11,1975 Sheet2of3 3,918,118

US. Patent Nov. 11, 1975 Sheet 3 of3 3,918,118

u i {ii l 11 i SWEEPING MACHINE This invention relates to a sweeping machine comprising a cylindrical rotary brush and a dirt container, which is disposed behind or before the brush and in which the dust is collected by being thrown over or as with a dustpan.

Specifically, the invention relates to a sweeping machine which comprises a suction fan and a filter system disposed between the suction fan and the dirt container. In such machines, the brush is disposed within a brush housing, which is open toward the street and provided with rubber-elastic seals for engaging the ground.

In a special embodiment, the sweeping machine, which is a self-propelled vehicle provided with wheels and a propulsion engine and, if desired, with a driver's seat, comprises in its vehicle body a vehicle frame, at least part of which extends over the sides adjacent to the dirt container.

If such self-collecting sweeping and vacuum cleaning machine collects the dust as with a dustpan, the dust container will be disposed before the brush, which sweeps up the dirt and throws it into the opening formed in the dust container and facing the brush. In other sweeping machines, particularly those consisting of relatively large vehicles, the dust is collected by being thrown over. In that case the dirt container is disposed behind the brush in the direction of travel and the dirt which has been picked up is thrown over the brush from the brush housing and from above into the dirt container.

The invention relates to sweeping machines, particularly sweeping and vacuum cleaningmachines, of both types.

Large sweeping and vacuum cleaning machines comprise a hydraulic mechanism for lifting the dirt container when the same is to be emptied. Such lifting mechanisms are known in machines which collect the dirt by one of the methods described above.

In small machines, particularly in machines which are steered by means of a handle bar, the low-capacity dirt container is removable by hand when it is to be emptied. In spite of thee low capacity of the container, it is difficult and requires a large effort to empty the container, particularly when heavy dirt, such as chips of castings, iron parts, or the like, has been collected. In medium-size sweeping machines, a hydraulically actuated mechanism is required to lift the container when it is to be emptied. Most machines of that size have only mechanical propulsion systems so that a special hydraulic system must be installed for emptying the container.

The invention relates particularly to small and medium-size sweeping machines, particularly to sweeping and vacuum cleaning machines. It is an object of the invention so to improve a sweeping machine of the kind described first hereinbefore that the handling of the dirt container is much facilitated without need for a special lifting mechanism. The handling is to be facilitated so that the container can be emptied even when it is filled with heavy dirt, and that the container can be installed in the machine in a simple manner and without a great effort. This will be particularly important if sweeping machines must be operated by persons who do not have a high physical strength and are not me-" chanically skilled.

This object is accomplished according to the invention in that the dirt container is disposed in the body of the sweeping machine and is pivoted to carriers, which are extensible out of said body. As a result, the dirt container carried by its carrier can be moved out of its operative position and out of the vehicle body by a person who does not have to carry the weight of the dirt container. Because the dirt container is pivotally mounted, it may be emptied before or behind the sweeping machine, depending on where the dirt container is disposed in accordance with the method of dirt collection which is adopted. As the carriers are retracted, the dirt container automatically resumes the position required for operation.

' According to a particularly preferred feature, the body of the sweeping machine contains extensible slidable rails, on which the dirt container is mounted. The slidable rails are simple means. Within the scope of the invention, integral or composite slidable rails may be used. It will be of special advantage if the slidable rails are guided by load-carrying frame parts of the vehicle frame. In that case there is no need for separate parts for guiding the slidable rails so that the weight of the sweeping machine and the structural expenditure in general are reduced. In a sweeping machine in which the vehicle body comprises a vehicle frame which extends at least in part beyond the sides adjacent to the dirt container, each slidable rail is desirably guided by a frame section member which is open toward one end of the vehicle. The frame section member may be a box section, channel, I-section or the like. The rail may be guided in a slot of a vertical wall portion and is desirably guided between transversely extending upper and lower surfaces of the frame section member.

Within the scope of the invention, the extensible slidable rails my be guided in a direction which has a certain inclination to the surface which supports the vehicle. A downward inclination in the direction in which the rails are extended may be desirable because the laden dirt container is then moved along a downwardly inclined path. In this case, special detent or stop means may be provided to hold the dirt container in the retracted position. In a preferred embodiment, the slidable rails are guided in a substantially horizontal direction.

It will be possible to provide the slidable rails on their sliding surfaces with coverings of low-friction material. According to a preferred feature, each slidable rail is provided with'at least two rollers, and that of said rollers which is disposed at the inner end of a slidable rail protrudes above the top of the rail whereas each roller which is spaced from said end roller protrudes below the underside of the slidable rail. In such an arrangement, only rolling friction must be overcome and the slidable rails may be used for an additional purpose, as will be described hereinafter, without need for additional means. The above-mentioned detent means may consist of detent recesses which are formed in the lower roller tracks of the frame section members and which receive the downwardly protruding rollers when the slidable rails have been retracted. When it is desired in such an arrangement to pull out the dirt container, it will be sufficient slightly to lift the carrying structure out of the slidable rails. Owing to the mechanical advantage, this will be easier than a lifting of the dirt container itself.

It will be of special advantage if the outer ends of the slidable rails are rigidly interconnected by a cross strut. The slidable rails and such strut form a forked carrier, which can be most easily handled. The cross strut serves desirably as a handle.

According to another desirable feature the cross strut forms a stop, which extends preferably above the plane defined by the slidable rails and is arranged to be engaged by the pivoted dirt container when the same is in position to be emptied. This feature will greatly facilitate the handling of the dust container.

According to a desirable feature, pivot pins are provided on both sides of the dirt container and are inserted into bearing recesses, which are formed on the insides of the slidable rails and are open upwardly and toward each other. When a machine embodying that feature is used to collect light dirt, the dirt container can be emptied by hand directly into a dustbin or the like. The use of a removable dirt container has also the advantage that the access to the internal parts of the machine, such as a filter system and the brush, will be greatly facilitated.

To ensure that the dirt in thebrush housing will be collected as completely as possible and particularly to prevent an ingress of by-padded air in conjunction with a suction fan, sweeping machines are provided with a sealing or contact edge which is engaged by the rim of the opening of the dirt container when the same has been retracted. Ifa suction fan succeeds a filter system, it will be essential to provided for a hermetic seal of the brush housing, the dirt container, and the filter system. Being provided with slidable rails, the machine according to the invention comprises means for lifting the outer ends of the retracted slidable rails so that the rim of the dirt container is forced against the contact edge. In that connection too it is desirable to use the abovementioned rollers because the upwardly protruding rol; lers are provided only at the inner end of each slidable rail whereas the downwardly protruding rollers can be raised from their tracks. The rollers require in any case that the frame section members guiding the slidable rails have an oversize dimension in the vertical direction in which the slidable rails are pivotally movable.

The apparatus desirably comprises at least one eccentric cam, which is rotatably mounted on the slidable rails and which is rotatable to move a supporting por; tion of the cam below the plane which is defined by the rollers which protrude below the slidable rails. In that case the dirt container can be moved by simple means into sealing engagement. Two eccentric cams provided with actuating levers are desirably mounted on the slidable rails so that the cams can directly cooperate with the slideways or roller tracks for the slidable rails. According to a preferred feature, each eccentric cam has a supporting portion which is engageable with a supporting surface for a slidable rail, particularly the lower roller track, when the slidable rails are to be lifted, and said supporting portion is relieved at an angle within the range of self-locking angles to provide for a restraint of the rails in their retracted position. This restraint is suitably improved in that a vertical line extending through the axes of rotation of the cams onto their supporting surface is disposed before the point where the cams are supported, in the direction of the retracting movement of the slidable rails. Specifically, the cams are relieved to some extent adjacent to their point of support and can be moved through a dead center to their operative position. If the cams mounted on both slidable rails are connected by a cross-strut, which may be connected to the levers for the cams, a handle will be provided for moving the dirt container.

According to another desirable feature, a transverse carrier is rotatably mounted between the extensible ends of the slidable rails and is provided with at least one eccentric cam, which has associated with it a supporting surface disposed at least in the middle portion of the vehicle body.

The invention will now be explained with reference to an embodiment which is shown diagrammatically and by way of example on the accompanying drawings, in which I FIG. 1 is a fragmentary side elevation showing a sweeping and vacuum cleaning machine which comprises a dirt container that has been extended and pivotally moved,

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary sectional view taken on line n -u in FIG. 1, I

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary side elevation showing a portion of a slidable rail within the frame section member for guiding the rail, and

FIG. 4 is a sectional view taken on line IV- IV in,

FIG. 3 and showing a modification.

The invention will be explained with referenceto a self-propelled sweeping machine 1, in which the dirt is thrown over into a dirt container 2 disposed behind a rotary cylindrical brush 3. The latter is mounted in a brush housing 4 disposed behind an outer enclosure.

The vehicle body comprises a closed frame 5, which is provided with frame section members, one. of which is designated 6 in FIG. 1. i

The vehicle comprises two rear wheels 7, only one of which is apparent from FIG. 1, and has in front, e.g., only one steerable drive wheel 8. Drive units are mounted under a drivers seat 9 and include, e.g., a suiction fan 10, which is connected to a filter system 11. An

opening is provided in the lower portion of the filter system and extends to the rear wall 12 of the brush housing 4 and is defined by a continuous peripheral sealing edge 13, which conforms to the rim 14 which defines the opening of the dirt container 2.

As is indicated by dotted lines in FIG. 1, this sealing edge 13 is formed by an open-bottommed channel section 46, which contains a seal 47, which consists of rubber-elastic material and has an exposed undersurface. The top edge of the dirt container 2 is forced against that seal 47. That top edge is narrow so that tolerances can be taken up by the wider seal and dirt cannot be retained at the edge of the dirt container 2 during the able rails 18, 19 on opposite sides. In FIG. 2, the slid-, able rail 18 is shown in section in FIG. 2 and in FIG. 4 l the other slidable rail 19 is shown on the other side of the vehicle. The frame section member on the other side is designated 20. For the sake of clearness, FIG. 1 shows in solid lines also that portion of the slidable rail 18 which remains in the frame section member 6 when i the rail has been extended. At least two rollers 21, 22, for instance, are mounted on each slidable rail. The roller 21 disposed at the inner end protrudes upwardly from the slidable rail. The other roller 22 which is nearer to the extensible end protrudes through an aperture 23 in the lower wall of the box-section slidable rail.

The axes 24, 25 for the rollers may be guided in the side i walls of the slidable rails 18 19 and bearings may be used for this purpose, if desired.

It is also apparent from FIG 2 that open-topped bearing recesses 26 are provided in the inside surfaces of the slidable rails 18, 19. These recesses have desirably downwardly converging entrance surfaces 27, 28 (FIG. 1). Outwardly' protruding trunnions 30 are mounted on the side walls 29 (FIG. 2) of the dirt container 2 and are adapted to be inserted from above into the bearing recesses. The trunnions are desirably disposed on an axis which extends through the center of gravity of the dirt container so that the pivotal movement for emptying the container will be facilitated because the entrance opening'3l is swung down toward the street surface, as is shown in solid lines in FIG. 1'.'

FIG. 2 shows also the-slidable rails in a position in which the rails are extended only to such an extent that the rollers 21, 22 are still within the frame section member 6. The slidable rails may be. adaptedto be locked in this position by separate detent means, e.g., by a recess which is disposed at32 in the lower roller track 17, and which automatically receives the roller The two slidable rails 18, 19 are preferably provided at their extensible rear end by a cross strut 33. This arrangement provides a forklike, inherently rigid carrier, which can easily be handled and automatically ensures a parallel movement of the slidable rails as the cross strut 33 serves as a handle. As is shown in FIG.,1 the cross strut is desirably carried by upwardly protruding, lateral extensions 34 of the slidable rails l8, 19 so that the cross strut is disposed over the plane defined by said rails. This has the advantage that the tipping movement of the dirt container toward the emptying position shown in FIG. 1 is limited and that additional controls may be provided below the cross strut 33. When the dirt container 2 is pivotally moved in the direction of the arrow 35, its limiting position is determined by the cross strut 33. The dirt container may be provided with a properly located extension serving as an abutment. The movement may be facilitated by a handle 36, which is mounted on a wall of the dirt container.

As is shown in FIGS. 1 and 3, the means for forcing the rim 14 of the dirt container 2 against the contact edge 13 comprise eccentric cams 37, 37, which are rotatably mounted on the inwardly open slidable rails 18, 19 by means of bearings 38, 38. The cams can be pivotally moved to protrude downwardly from the slidable rails 18, 19. The slidable rails are open-bottomed adjacent to the cams, as is particularly apparent from FIG. 3. The profile is designed so that the downward pivotal movement of the cams causes the lower rollers 22 and an additional roller 39 disposed near the outer end to be lifted from the lower roller tracks 17 and 40. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 4, the cam 37 is provided with an actuating lever 41. Both cams may be separately actuated with such levers 41, 41, which are disposed on both sides of the machine. The cams and particularly the levers are connected by a cross strut 42, which permits of a simultaneous movement of the cams disposed on both sides in unison and which may be used as a handle for pulling out the dirt container. With reference to FIG. 3 showing the rear end of the retracted slidable rail 19, the lever 41 must be turned in the clockwise sense in this case so that the cross strut and handle 42 would be pivotally moved rearwardly out of the vehicle body at the same time whereas said strut is otherwise contained in a recess in the vehicle body and held between the extensions 34. The cross strut 33 between the two slidable rails 18, 19 is dis posed on such a high level that the actuating levers 41, 41 and the cross strut 42 connecting them can be pivotally moved under the cross strut 33.

The cams have a portion 43 which is engageable with the lower roller track 40 and which has such an angle of lead that the cam is self-locking. The engaging portion 43 may be roughened. To automatically lock the retracted dirt container 2 in position, the point of support, a

44 is most preferably offset in the direction of the extending movement from a vertical line extending through the axis of the bearing 38. This offset is indicated at 45 in FIG. 3. FIG. 3 shows another desirable feature which resides in that the cam is relieved adjacent to the point of support in such a manner that it movesthrough a dead center to the position shown in FIG. 3. In this case the elastic seal at the contact edge 13 must be compressible to such an extent that the seal can take up the ascent which is due to the movement through the dead center and which is succeeded by a certain descent and that this will not eliminate the sealing effect.

Owing to the pivotal suspension of the dirt container 2, the narrow .edge 14 which defines the opening of the container can be uniformly pressed against the seal 47 throughout the periphery of the container.

As is apparent in FIG. 4, at least one slideway member 48 is mounted on the inside of the vertical wall portion 49 of the frame section member 20. This slideway member serves as a lateral guide for the slidable rails and is disposed on the outside of the slidable rails l8, 19.

Such slideway member is indicated in dotted lines in FIG. 2.

What is claimed is:

l. A sweeping machine comprising a wheeled chassis, a downwardly open brush housing mounted on the chassis, a cylindrical brush rotatably mounted in the brush housing, a dirt container, which is detachably connected to the brush housing, frame section members extending along the chassis on both sides thereof, carriers which are slidably guided in said frame section members in the longitudinal direction thereof, and bearing means pivotally connecting said dirt container to said carriers.

2. A sweeping machine as set forth in claim 1, in which said frame section members at least at one end are inwardly open and comprise vertical wall portions and transversely extending top and bottom roller tracks, the carriers consist of slidable rails, each of which is provided with at least two rollers, one of said rollers associated with each slidable rail is an end roller disposed at the inner end of the slidable rail and protrudes above said rail, and said rollers associated with each slidable rail except for said end roller are spaced from said end roller and protrude below said slidable rail.

3. A sweeping machine as set forth in claim 2, in which each of said frame section members is an inwardly open channel.

4. A sweeping machine as claimed in claim 2, in which each roller track for a downwardly protruding roller is provided with a detent recess arranged to receive said roller when the slidable rail is in an extended position.

5. A sweeping machine as claimed in claim 2, in which the outer ends of the slidable rails are rigidly connected by a cross strut, which forms a handle for a carrying structure comprising both slidable rails, and said cross strut is located to form a stop which is engageable by the pivoted dirtcontainer in emptying position.

6. A sweeping machine as claimed in claim 1, in which the bearing means comprise trunnions carried by said dust container on opposite sides thereof and opentopped bearing recesses provided in the carriers, said trunnions being rotatably mounted in and upwardly removable from said bearing recesses.

7. A sweeping machine as set forth in claim 1, in which said chassis comprises a contact edge, which conforms to an edge defining an opening of the dirt container and is provided with a continuous peripheral seal, said edge of said dirt container is adapted to be forced against said seal, lifting means are provided at the outer ends of the carriers and are supported at their other end in the chassis and in a lifting position lift the outer ends of the carriers together with the bearing means for the dirt container and force said edge of the container against said contact edge.

8. A sweeping machine as set forth in claim 7, in which said lifting means comprise eccentric cams, levers for actuating said cams, and pivot pins pivotally connecting said cams to the outer end portions of the 8 carriers, said camscooperating with outer end portions of the lower roller tracks and being pivotally movable below the plane which is definedby the rollers protruding below the carriers. A

9. A sweeping machine as set forth in claim 8, in

which the cams havea peripheral portion which isien-1 gageable with the lower roller tracks for the carriers when the latter are to be lifted and is relieved at such an angle that the contacting surface portions of the cams and roller tracks are in self-locking engagement.

10. A sweeping machine as set forth in claim 8, in which the peripheral surfaces of the cams are so shaped relative to their axes of rotation that imaginary vertical lines extending through the axes of rotation of the cams onto the roller tracks supporting said cams precede in the direction of the retracting movement of the carriers the point of support of the cams moved to lift the carrier, and the cams have attheir periphery a radially re- 7 lieved portion adjacent to the point of support.

11. A sweeping machine as set forth in claim 8, in

which cams mounted on both carriers are interconnected by a cross strut, which forms a handle for mov ing the cams and for pulling the carriers connected by said cross strut.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2689367 *Sep 17, 1948Sep 21, 1954Parker Sweeper CompanySweeper
US2784440 *May 26, 1955Mar 12, 1957Wayne Mfg CompanyIndustrial sweeping machines
US3710412 *Jun 11, 1971Jan 16, 1973Hollowell JVacuum trash collector
US3761988 *Feb 24, 1972Oct 2, 1973Wayne Manufacturing CoRear dump mechanisms for road sweepers
US3837157 *Dec 26, 1972Sep 24, 1974Der Lely CDevices for picking up material lying on the ground
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4062664 *Mar 15, 1976Dec 13, 1977Nfe International, Ltd.Particle separator apparatus
US4580313 *Sep 12, 1983Apr 8, 1986Tennant CompanyWalk behind floor maintenance machine
US4716621 *Jul 16, 1986Jan 5, 1988Dulevo S.P.A.Floor and bounded surface sweeper machine
US5239720 *Oct 24, 1991Aug 31, 1993Advance Machine CompanyMobile surface cleaning machine
US5377376 *Aug 23, 1993Jan 3, 1995Advance Machine CompanyMobile surface cleaning machine
US6569217May 10, 2000May 27, 2003Thomas M. DeMarcoIndustrial dust collector with multiple filter compartments
US7877838 *Oct 25, 2005Feb 1, 2011Redexim Handel-En Exploitatie Mij. B.V.Cleaning apparatus, such as for synthetic grass
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/83, 15/340.1
International ClassificationE01H1/04, E01H1/08, E01H1/00
Cooperative ClassificationE01H1/047, E01H1/0854
European ClassificationE01H1/08C3, E01H1/04D