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Publication numberUS3918196 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 11, 1975
Filing dateSep 24, 1973
Priority dateSep 24, 1973
Publication numberUS 3918196 A, US 3918196A, US-A-3918196, US3918196 A, US3918196A
InventorsSchleich Friedrich
Original AssigneeSchleich Friedrich
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Flexible pegs and connectors for use in a game or amusement device
US 3918196 A
Abstract
A peg for use in a game or amusement device in which pegs are connected either indirectly by means of connector pieces or directly to one another; such a peg comprising a flexible wire core enveloped by synthetic resin with the ends of the envelope being rigid and the remaining central section of the envelope being pliant. The rigid ends of the envelope are secured to the core by means of notches in the core, and the pliant central section is a one piece body with radial circular flanges.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

D United States Patent 1191 1 1 3,918,196

Schleich 1 Nov. 11, 1975 [5 FLEXIBLE PEGS AND CONNECTORS FOR 3,807,086 4/1974 Schleich .1 46/162 USE IN A GAME AMUSEMENT DEVICE FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS Inventor: Friedrich Schleich, Am Limes 73, 867305 5/1961 United Kingdom .4 46/23 D-707l Horlikofen, Germany 22 Filed; Sept 24 97 Primary E.\aminerLouis G. Mancene Assistant Examiner-Robert Fv Cutting [2]] Appl 400,051 Attorney, Agent, or FirmMason, Kolehmainen,

Rathbum & Wyss [52] US. Cl. 46/29; 46/151; 46/161 [51] Int. Cl. A63H 33/10; A63H 3/04 [57] ABSTRACT [58] Field of Search 46/22, 23, 25, 2491, l51, A peg for use in a game or amusement device in which 6/162 pegs are connected either indirectly by means of connector pieces or directly to one another; such a peg [56] References C'ted comprising a flexible wire core enveloped by synthetic UNITED STATES PATENTS resin with the ends of the envelope being rigid and the 2.392024 1/1946 Couri 46/162 remaining central section of the envelope being pliant. 2.875.101 2/1959 Ehrlich 46/27 The rigid ends of the envelope are secured to the core 3.019552 2/1962 Schleich 46/ 162 by means of notches in the core. and the pliant central 3'453452 7/19?) 46/29 section is a one piece body with radial circular flanges. 3552.057 l/l9/l 'Antoinette 46/l5l 1624.691 1 1/1971 Robson 46/162 12 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures US. Patent Nov. 11, 1975 FIG. 2

FLEXIBLE PEGS AND CONINECTOYRSIIFOR U SE IN A GAMEOR AMUSEMENT DE I E The invention is concerned with a game or amusement device which has pegs and connectorpieces the pegs have suitable holes sothat they may be di-" rectly interconnected. Realtively stiff frameworks may hence be constructed with the pegs directly attached, or indirectly attached by means of connectof pieces. The shapes and patterns which may be formed are limited by the shape or shapes of the pegs, theconnector pieces and the orientation of the holes.

The object of the invention is an improved peg to enable a greater variety of shapes or patterns in the frameworks to be formed, thereby enabling a playing child to express his individuality in the frameworks and their construction.

It should be noted that an increased variety of shapes and patterns of frameworks is made possible by the invention whilst using a single type of this peg.

' According to the invention a peg comprises a flexible wire core completely enveloped by synthetic resin with the ends of the envelope being rigid and the central section being pliant.

A peg according to the invention is obtained which may be bent to any desired shape as in the limbs of well known toy figures. Hence pegs according to the invention in combination with the connector pieces provide a game which allows a great variety of shapes and patterns to be formed in frameworks sufficiently stiff to be self-sustaining.

The rigid ends or caps of the peg allow it to be firmly attached to a connector piece to enable it to be bent whilst connected without coming loose.

Usually aluminium is used in the flexible toy figures and were it to be used for the core of the peg, it may, after an amount of use of the peg, penetrate the synthetic resin envelope. Penetration would be through the ends of the envelope because of the action of inserting the peg into a hole. The rigid ends or caps prevent any such occurrence and consequent weakening of connection, and also prevents any possible injury to a child.

The flexibility of the peg is related to the shape of the central section of the envelope between the two caps as well as of course the material of the core and the material of the envelope.

If for ease of handling, the cross section of the central section of the envelope is made larger than that of the ends, then the central section must have suitable weak spots or gaps or spaces in order that flexibility is maintained. Flexibility can be maintained if the central section of the envelope is formed as one piece with a series of radial circular flanges, much like discs, with each disc tapering from its centre radially outwardly to a thin edge or rim.

The flexible wire core may be of aluminium or other cold ductile metal of circular or other cross section.

The surface of the core may be rough or smooth. The

flexible core may be formed. as twisted strands of thin wire. The essential feature of the core is flexibility, no matterhow formed in what shape and of what material. The choice of how to form, towhat shape and of what material may be guided by. practical experience.

Additional features and a preferred method of manufacture will appear from the following description made with. reference to the drawings of an example of a peg according to the invention:

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. lisa side view. of a peg designed in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a side sectional viewof the peg shown in FIG. 1 with the section taken along line 2 -2 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 3 is a sectionalview of the peg shown in FIG. 1 with the sectioritaken along .line 3-3 in FIG. 1; and

FIG. 4 is a perspective view illustrating how pegs of the type shown in FIG. 1 may be used in connection with connector pieces in the construction of objects such as the illustrated little man.

DETAILEDDESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT With reference to FIGS. 1 through 3, the wire core 1 has at each end a notch 2 which provides a means for retaining a rigid end piece or cap 3, which covers the end. Each cap is made of a relatively hard setting synthetic resin. Each cap 3 has a collar 4 which abuts onto the surface of a connector piece when the peg end is inserted into ahole of such a piece. The end caps 3 are preferably fitted to the wire core by an injection moulding operation.

The central section between the end caps is enveloped with a one piece body 5 of P.V.C. of larger cross section than the caps, and which has a series of radial circular flanges. Each flange is a disc which tapers outwardly to a thin edge.

It is preferred that the body 5 is fitted by injection moulding after the caps are attached, so that each end of the body overlaps onto the collar 4. This helps to retain the body in position, especially if there is a circumferential groove 6 (see FIG. 2) around the collar 4. The body may also be secured directly to the core by means of a circumferential groove or grooves in the core. This would be done with large sizes of peg which have holes in the collar for direct interconnection of the pegs.

The preferred two stage fitting of the synthetic resin envelope to the core allows the respective degrees of hardness of the central section body and the end caps to be controlled for their optimum values.

The preferred method of manufacture allows semifinished components to be used.

The end caps and the central section body can be produced in any desired shape and preferably of different colours.

With reference to FIG. 4, the connector pieces 7, 7', 8, and 8' may be solid or hollow with flat or curved surface, and have a multiplicity of holes for the pegs.

I claim:

1. A peg for a game or amusement device, in which the peg comprises a flexible wire core covered by a synthetic-resin envelope, with the ends of the envelope being rigid and the central remaining section of the envelope being pliant, and in which said pliant section of the envelope is a one-piece body with radial flanges, having a cross-section greater than said rigid ends, and wherein said rigid ends are secured to said wire core.

2. Peg according to claim 1 in which the envelope is secured to the core.

3. Peg according to claim 1 in which the rigid ends of the envelope are separate pieces from the pliant central section of the envelope, and in which said rigid ends are secured to the core by means of notches in the core.

4. Peg according to claim 3 in which the pliant central section of the envelope partly overlaps the rigid ends of the envelope.

5. Peg according to claim 4 in which the pliant section is attached to the rigid end where they overlap.

6. Peg according to claim 1 in which the flanges are like discs and taper from the centre radially outwardly to a thin edge or rim.

7. Peg according to claim 1 to which is added at least one connector piece having an outer surface through which at least one hole has been formed and in which a rigid end includes a collar which abuts the surface of said connector piece when the rigid end of the peg is inserted into said hole in the connector piece.

8. Peg according to claim 7 in which the pliant section at least partly overlaps the collar and the collar has means for securing the pliant section to it.

9. Peg according to claim 1 in which the pliant section is a different colour to the rigid ends.

1Q. A process for manufacturing a peg which comprises making notches in a flexible wire, fitting rigid 4 caps of synthetic resin over the ends of the wire by injection moulding so as to cover the notches, and fitting a pliant envelope of synthetic resin by injection moulding over the remaining uncovered wire.

11. A peg for use in a game or amusement device comprising a flexible wire core which, when deformed, retains its deformed position, rigid caps of synthetic resin which are fitted over the ends of said wire by injection moulding, and a pliant, one-piece jacket of synthetic resin having radial flanges which is fitted about said wire core to join said caps by injection moulding to thereby cover the remaining uncovered wire.

12. A game or amusement device comprising:

at least one solid or hollow connector piece having a flat or curved outer surface in which at least one hole has been formed;

a peg comprising a flexible wire core which, when deformed, retains its deformed position, a synthetic resin envelope covering said wire core, said envelope having rigid end portions which enclose ends of said core and which form pins suitable for insertion into the hole in said connector piece, and said envelope having a central portion which forms a pliant jacket about said wire core and which joins said end portions to completely encompass said wire core.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2392024 *Feb 9, 1945Jan 1, 1946Cole Couri HarrietArticle of manufacture
US2875101 *Jul 29, 1954Feb 24, 1959Joseph R EhrlichRubber coated wood
US3019552 *Sep 12, 1958Feb 6, 1962Friedrich SchleichFlexible figure toy
US3452452 *Aug 28, 1967Jul 1, 1969Nat Res DevSkeletal molecular models
US3552057 *May 29, 1968Jan 5, 1971Yolande Marie Antoinette De PeFigure toy
US3624691 *Feb 20, 1970Nov 30, 1971Mattel IncRealistic toy figure
US3807086 *Dec 8, 1971Apr 30, 1974Schleich FBending figure
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4141177 *May 11, 1977Feb 27, 1979Vu Lisa AReversible, creative dolls and method of assembling same
US4148151 *May 31, 1977Apr 10, 1979Schleich & Co.Toy figurine
US4579538 *Jan 16, 1984Apr 1, 1986Tomy Kogyo Co. Inc.Construction toy
US5310376 *Apr 19, 1993May 10, 1994Combi CorporationToy that can be assembled independently by a child
US5433549 *Sep 7, 1993Jul 18, 1995Thomas H. McGaffiganFlexible tie strut
US5445471 *Jul 12, 1993Aug 29, 1995Euwe Eugen Wexler GmbhPlastic joint for articulating two components
US5498190 *Jun 27, 1994Mar 12, 1996Handsontoys, Inc.Flexible foam construction toy and method of manufacturing same
US5667326 *Sep 6, 1994Sep 16, 1997Mcgaffigan; Thomas H.Flexible tie strut
US6461215 *Sep 17, 1998Oct 8, 2002Interlego AgToy building set comprising a tubular, elongated, flexible toy building element, and such a toy building element
US6800016May 30, 2003Oct 5, 2004Mattel, Inc.Flexible dolls and posable action figures
US7479054Sep 20, 2004Jan 20, 2009Mattel, Inc.Flexible dolls and posable action figures
US9308465 *Jun 30, 2014Apr 12, 2016Huntar CompanyToy construction kit
US9345982 *Sep 1, 2014May 24, 2016Joseph FarcoBuilding block universal joint system
US20040002279 *May 30, 2003Jan 1, 2004Wittenberg Mark S.Flexible dolls and posable action figures
US20110177752 *Jan 20, 2010Jul 21, 2011Leonard PatsinerBendable and Twistable Support Member and Toy Animal or Cartoon Character of Using Same
US20130273805 *Apr 17, 2012Oct 17, 2013Paul LeonhardtStackable Humanoid Toy
US20140199912 *Jan 14, 2014Jul 17, 2014Peter Alan FishToy figure having reconfigurable portions and methods of using the same
EP0498966A2 *Dec 24, 1991Aug 19, 1992Combi CorporationToy that can be assembled independently by a child
WO1995007416A1 *Sep 6, 1994Mar 16, 1995Mcgaffigan Thomas HFlexible tie strut
WO1996000117A1 *Jun 26, 1995Jan 4, 1996Hands On Toys, IncorporatedFlexible foam construction toy and method of manufacturing same
WO1998032509A1 *Jan 29, 1997Jul 30, 1998Yesh, Marvelous Toys Ltd.An assembly toy and a connector therefor
Classifications
U.S. Classification446/107, 446/97, 428/16, 446/126
International ClassificationA63H33/04
Cooperative ClassificationA63H33/04
European ClassificationA63H33/04