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Publication numberUS3918454 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 11, 1975
Filing dateMar 2, 1973
Priority dateMar 2, 1973
Publication numberUS 3918454 A, US 3918454A, US-A-3918454, US3918454 A, US3918454A
InventorsDreyer Frederic C, Korodi Miklos B
Original AssigneeDreyer Frederic C, Korodi Miklos B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Soilage-indicating diaper
US 3918454 A
Abstract
A diaper which is self-indicating to an observer when it is soiled by its wearer. The indicator layer is protruded or ruptured through the absorptive layer to provide contact with excreta such as fecal matter and conduction of the moisture of the excreta through to the visible portion of the indicator layer.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Korodi et a1.

[ Nov. 11, 1975 SOILAGE-INDICATING DIAPER [76] Inventors: Miklos B. Korodi, 440 E. 79th, New

York, NY. 10021; Frederic C. Dreyer, 2111 Jeff. Davis Hwy., Arlington, Va. 22202 [22] Filed: Mar. 2, 1973 [21] Appl. No.: 337,767

[52] US. Cl 128/287; 128/284 [51] Int. Cl. A61f 13/16 [58] Field of Search 128/287, 284, 295

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,612,055 10/1971 Mesek et a1. 128/287 3,675,654 7/1972 Baker et a1. 128/287 3.731.685 5/1973 Eidus 128/284 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 1,355,018 2/1964 France 128/284 Prinutry E.\'aminerAldrich F. Medbery Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Frederic C. Dreyer [57] ABSTRACT A diaper which is self-indicating to an observer when it is soiled by its wearer. The indicator layer is protruded or ruptured through the absorptive layer to provide contact with excreta such as fecal matter and conduction of the moisture of the excreta through to the visible portion of the indicator layer.

5 Claims, 9 Drawing Figures U.S. Patent Nov. 11,1975

Fililll lllll llll. O O O O n o o o o FIG.1

FIG?

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx SOILAGE-INDICATING DIAPER BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE PRIOR None of the prior art means forindicating soilage of diapers to observers has been found to be entirely satisfactory. i

In an application filed concurrently herewith, 'Ser. No. 337,771 fi led Mar. 2 1973, Miklos B. Korodi has set forth a unique diaper which includes an externallyvisible indicating layer which signals the presence .of excreta in the diaper. Although this diaper is a distinct improvement overthe prior art, it may not yield the desired result under certain circumstances. In particular, dry fecal-matter, of relatively low free-moisture content, may contain insufficient moisture to wet" through the first, absorbent layer orlayers adjacent the skin in order to contact the indicator layer.

This problem becomes most important when the infant, or incontinent person wearing the diaper, has the skin irritation familiarly known as diaper rash. The fusel oil, ammonia and other corrosives found in exc'reta are available for attack on, and further complication of, the sore area.

Also, with some diseases, the excreta of humans is abnormally high in corrosive matter and may be abnormally low in free-moisture content. This combination of circumstances is particularly dangerous and problematical.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In general, the preferred form of the present invention comprises an improvement in the diaper disclosed in the aforementioned application by Miklos B. Korodi,

and includes exposure means such as apertures in the basic absorbent layer of the diaper to provide direct contact of the indicator-layer with the fecal matter or other excreta.

Preferably, a portion of the indicator-layer is protruded through the apertures to present direct contact areas with the excreta.

The preferred method of forming a diaper according to the invention includes a simultaneous protrusion of the indicator-layer into the absorptive layer as the apertures are formed therein.

Therefor, the present invention provides for triggering at least a portion of the soilage-indicator even when relatively small amounts of moisture are excreted by the body.

A better understanding of the invention may be derived from the following description and accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a view of the exterior side or outside of a diaper according to the invention;

FIG. 2 is a view of the inner side of the diaper of FIG.

FIG. 3 is an oversize section of a portion of FIG. 1 taken on the lines 33;

FIG. 4 is a section similar to that of FIG. 3 and showing a modified form of the invention;

2 FIGS. 5 through 5c are similar, schematic views showing successive steps in forming a diaper in accordance with the invention, and

FIG. 6 is an oversize view of a portion of FIG. 50.

\ DESCRIPTION OFJTHE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT I As shown in the drawings, the preferred form of the invention comprises a diaper 1 having an absorbent inner wall 2 formed of any of several suitable materials. A substantially impervious backing sheet or outer ply 3 serves to confine dampness within the absorbent layer Suitable means, such as snaps, ties, or the tabs .4with adhesive areas 5, are used to secure the diaper to the person. The diaper may be cut out, asv at 6 and 7, to provide leg clearance, and includes ventral and dorsal portions 8 and 9, 'respectively.-

It is to be understood that the particular-shape of the diaper is not critical to the invention, and'that reversible shapes may be used.

A strip of bibulous material 11, in accordance with the aforementioned application of Miklos B. Korodi, is oriented between the ventral and dorsal waistportions, extending through the crotch area, and is impregnated with a suitable soilage-indicating composition such as food coloring or a dye such as set forth in U.S. Pat. No. 3,675,654.

Preferably, the indicator layer 11 is displayed to the exterior of the diaper by means of a transparent window 12, which need be only transparent enough to permit the visible change to be observed.

The inner, absorbent wall 2 carries a series of perforations 14 therethrough which provides direct access between the indicator layer 11 and the soilable surface of the diaper. This provides for direct contact and permits wicking" of moisture to'the readily-visible indication areas in the ventral and dorsal, waist ares.

An alternate form of the invention is shown in FIG. 4, in which the same numerals, primed, are used to denote elements similar to those of FIG. 1. However, a portion of the material of the indicator layer 1 l is protruded as plugs 15 into the apertures 14 of the absorbent wall 2.

The embodiment of FIG. 4 provides immediate contact of excreta with the bibulous indicator layer via the plugs 15, to permit triggering of the indicator by the excreta.

A further embodiment of the present invention is shown in FIGS. 5 through 6, in which a punch 13 is used to draw fibers or strands 16 from the bibulous indicator-layer 11 to protrude through an aperture 14 which is simultaneously formed by the punch 13.

Preferably, the punch 13 includes an initial cutting edge 18 and a groove 19 for accomodating the strands 16 as they are forced through the layer 2.

If necessary, and as shown in FIG. 5c, the stock material may be smoothed, such as by rollers 20, to flatten any protruding tufts of strands 16. A harmless pocket 17 remains in the indicator layer.

Preferably, the indicator layer 11 is then covered by a window layer 12 which is sufficiently transparent to the visible signal in accordance with the aforementioned Miklos B. Korodi invention.

With the method depicted in FIGS. 5 through 6, plugs are provided which are similar to the plugs 15 of FIG. 4, but the operation is much more suited to highspeed, autimatic production.

When certain, staining chemical-indicators are used in the indicator layer 11, it is preferable that the indicator be impregnated only in selected areas of the waist portions, in order to avoid a measled effect on the infant when he is changed.

To this purpose, I prefer to impregnate local zones of the indicator layer 11, in between the aperture areas 14, (FIG. 4), to minimize dye transfer to the facing area adjacent the skin.

However, it is to be understood that a chemical indicator which is non-marking to skin need not be so calized, as long as it meets the requirement of being non-toxic.

Thus, it is. apparent that the present invention provides an improved, spoilage-indicating diaper which is sensitive to, and triggered by even minimum amounts of excreta, and which signals the presence of such minor soilage to areas which are visible regardless of the position of the wearer.

We claim:

l. A soilage-indicating diaper having an absorbent body,

opposed waist portions adapted to cover ventral and dorsal areas of the body,

a crotch area in said body and joining said waist portions, an indicating layer of bibulous material adja- 4 cent the outer surface of the absorbent body extending between the waist portions and through said crotch area,

said bibulous layer being impregnated with indicator means for causing a visible indication upon soilage of said body,

means for exposing a portion of said bibulous layer through said absorbent body, said exposure means including at least one aperture through said absorbent body,

and a portion of said bibulous material being positioned within said absorbent body aperture.

2. The soilage-indicating diaper of claim 1 in which strand portions of said bibulous layer are deformed through said absorbent-body aperture.

3. The soilage-indicating diaper of claim 1 in which the bibulous layer is extended into the aperture as a plug.

4. The soilage-indicating diaper of claim 1 in which said bibulous layer is impregnated only in selected areas, and said portions in said absorbent-body apertures are free of the impregnant.

5. The soilage-indicating diaper of claim 4 in which the portion of the bibulous layer at the crotch area is free from the impregnant.

l l l

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3612055 *Jan 29, 1970Oct 12, 1971Johnson & JohnsonDisposable diaper or the like and method of manufacture
US3675654 *Apr 1, 1970Jul 11, 1972Procter & GambleDisposable article with mositure-actuated indicating agent
US3731685 *Apr 1, 1971May 8, 1973Eidus WMoisture indicating strip for diapers and surgical dressings
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4192311 *Dec 5, 1977Mar 11, 1980Felfoldi James JDisposable diaper with wetness indicator
US4231370 *Jun 18, 1979Nov 4, 1980The Procter & Gamble CompanyDisposable diaper type garment having wetness indicator
US4287153 *Nov 30, 1979Sep 1, 1981Towsend Marvin SDisposable article with non-leachable saline water indicator
US4327731 *Jul 7, 1980May 4, 1982Powell Nelson BMoisture indicator
US4507121 *May 2, 1983Mar 26, 1985Leung Martin CDisposable diaper with isolated wetness indicator
US4559949 *Aug 15, 1983Dec 24, 1985Levine Robert AStool sampling device
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Classifications
U.S. Classification604/361
International ClassificationA61F13/42
Cooperative ClassificationA61F13/42
European ClassificationA61F13/42