Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3918590 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 11, 1975
Filing dateJul 18, 1973
Priority dateJul 18, 1973
Publication numberUS 3918590 A, US 3918590A, US-A-3918590, US3918590 A, US3918590A
InventorsD Altrui Thomas N
Original AssigneeD Altrui Thomas N
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Demountable storage racks
US 3918590 A
Abstract
A demountable cantilever storage rack comprises a plurality of vertical post I-beams, each having first and second walls with inclined inner surfaces joined by a central web. Horizontal load-bearing members each comprise first and second wall portions on opposite sides of the I-beam. Brackets extending into the I-beam from the wall portions have inclined surfaces that wedge against the inner surfaces of the vertical post walls when the wall portions are bolted together. Thus, when mounted, the load-bearing members are supported by the binding action of the brackets on the inner surfaces of the I-beams.
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 DAltrui [451 Nov; 11, 1975 1 DEMOUNTABLE STORAGE RACKS [76] Inventor: Thomas N. DAltrui, 667 Evergreen Parkway, Union, NJ. 07083 [22] Filed: July 18, 1973 21 Appl. No.: 380,158

[52] US. Cl. 211/176; 248/245; 403/188 [51] Int. Cl. A471) 5/10 [58] Field of Search 211/176, 177, 148;

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,930,488 3/1960 Best et a1. 211/176 3,251,478 5/1966 Frazier.... 211/176 3,335,992 8/1967 Frazier.... 248/245 3,489,291 1/1970 Frazier.... 248/245 X 3,698.566 10/1972 DAltrui 211/176 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 20,354 2/1929 Netherlands 403/387 Primary E.rcmziner-Roy D. Frazier Assistant E.\'uminerRobert W. Gibson, Jr.

[5 7] ABSTRACT A demountable cantilever storage rack comprises a plurality of vertical post I-beams, each having first and second walls with inclined inner surfaces joined by a central web. Horizontal load-bearing members each comprise first and second wall portions on opposite sides of the l-beamr Brackets extending into the I- beam from the wall portions have inclined surfaces that wedge against the inner surfaces of the vertical post walls when the wall portions are bolted together. Thus, when mounted, the load-bearing members are supported by the binding action of the brackets on the inner surfaces of the l-beams.

11 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures U.S. Patent Nov. 11,1975 Shet1of2 3,918,590

FIG.

FIG. 2

U.S. Patent Nov.11, 1975 Sheet20f2 3,918,590

iilj iim DEMOUNTABLE STORAGE RACKS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to storage racks, and more particularly, to demountable cantilever storage racks that can be easily assembled and modified.

As is pointed out, for example, in the U.S. patent of DAltrui, No. 3,371,798, issued Mar. 5, 1968, the U.S. patent of DAltrui, No. 3,554,477, issued Jan. 12, 1971, and the U.S. patent of DAltrui, No; 3,698,566, issued Oct. 17, 1972, cantilever storage racks are often favored for storing bulky industrial materials because of the ease with which such materials can be stored and removed with the aid of such apparatus as fork-lift trucks, stacker cranes, hoists, and the like. Cantilever racks typically comprise a plurality of horizontal loadbearing arms each mounted at one end to a vertical post. The load-bearing arms of adjacent vertical posts may be adjusted to be of the same height such that a pallet containing goods to be stored may be conveniently placed on the two adjacent arms by a conventional fork-lift truck.

It is often important that such racks be easily assembled, disassembled (or demounted), and modified, to accommodate readily any of various types of goods to be stored. It is usually desirable that the heights of the horizontal arms be readily adjustable to any desired location. Further, it is generally desirable that such racks be economical to construct and be structurally strong and reliable.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is an object of this invention to provide dependable demountable cantilever storage racks.

It is another object of this invention to provide relatively economical storage racks that are relatively easy to assemble and disassemble.

It is still another object of this invention to provide mounting devices for storageracks by which the horizontal load-bearing arms may be conveniently adjusted to any of various heights.

These and other objects of the invention are attained in an illustrative embodiment comprising a plurality of vertical I -beam posts, each supporting a plurality of load-bearing arms. Brackets extending into the I-beam from the load-bearing arms have inclined surfaces that wedge against the inner surfaces of the I-beams when the load-bearingarms are clamped or bolted onto the I-beam. Thus", when mounted, the load-bearing arms are supported by the binding action of the brackets on the inner surfaces of the I-beam.

The brackets may conveniently be angle irons which i are each welded onto a load-bearing arm so as to engage one wall of the I-beam. Alternatively, each bracket may be a solid member having two inclined surfaces each of which is adapted to engage opposite inner walls of the I-beam. In either case, when the bracket surfaces are wedged into the I-beam it constitutes a sturdy mount for the horizontal load-bearing arm.

In still another embodiment, the vertical post comprises a channel member having a U-shaped cross-section, rather than an I-beam. The horizontal load-bearing member is clamped to the channel as before with the bracket surfaces engaging the two inner wall surfaces. The same clamping action as before secures the load-bearing arm to the vertical posts.

As will be appreciated more fully hereinafter, the invention provides a simple and economical method for using conventional stock to construct dependable, easily assembled cantilever storage racks that are utterly reliable. As will become clear later, even if the bolt which clamps the horizontal load-bearing member to the vertical post should become loosened, the inevitable torque of the load-bearing member causes the bracket to bind within the channel of the vertical post thereby to prevent collapse of the structure. Finally, the foregoing advantages are achieved without making apertures in the vertical posts or otherwise impairing the structural integrity of any of the components.

These and other objects, features, and advantages of the invention will be better appreciated from a consideration of the following detailed description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawing.

DRAWING DESCRIPTION FIG. 1 is a side view of a cantilever storage rack in accordance with an illustrative embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 2 is a view taken along lines 2-2 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a view taken along lines 33 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a view taken along lines 44 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a sectional view of an alternative embodiment of the invention; and

FIG. 6 is a sectional view of another embodiment of the invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION Referring now to FIGS. 1 and 2, there is shown, as an illustrative embodiment of the invention, a cantilever storage rack 11 comprising a plurality of vertical posts 12, each supporting a plurality of horizontal load-bearing arms 13. Base members 14 provide stability and the various vertical posts are supported in a conventional manner by connection members 16. As is known in the art, cantilever storage racks are well adapted for storing long, rigid stock such as structural steel between two or more horizontal load-bearing arms 13. For example, such racks can conveniently be loaded by a fork-lift truck facing the free ends of the load-bearing arms and either placing the stock directly onto the load-bearing arms, or loading a pallet on adjacent arms 13.

The desirability of readily adjusting the height of, or demounting, load-bearing arms 13 is also well recognized in the art. Referring now to FIGS. 3 and 4, there is shown in more detail the mounting structure of the horizontal load-bearing arms 13 which give ease of use, economy, and reliability in accordance with an illustrative embodiment of the invention. In this particular embodiment,'the load-bearing arms comprise U-shaped load-bearing members 28, each having a wall 19 upon which brackets 20 are mounted. The vertical post 12 comprises two parallel walls 22 and 23 joined by a central web 24. As is known, the inner surfaces of conventional l-beam walls are inclined and this is true of the inner surfaces 22' and 23' of walls 22 and 23.

The U-shaped load-bearing members are clamped to the vertical post 12 by a pair of bolts 25 and 26. Brackets 20 each have inclined surfaces that approximately match the inclined surfaces of walls 22 and 23 and thereby wedge against the I-beam walls as the loadbearing members are clamped together. The clamping may be done by tightening nuts 27, and as the nuts are tightened, brackets 20 wedge firmly against the inner 3 surfaces of the I-beam vertical post.

From the foregoing, it can be appreciated that the load-bearing arms can be easily assembled and easily adjusted vertically. When the desired height is determined, the nuts 27 are tightened to give firm and dependable mounting. Thereafter, the brackets bind against the I-beam walls and there is virtually no possibility of spurious slippage or collapse; as the load on the horizontal arm increases, the binding action likewise increases. Moreover, it can be shown that, even if nuts 27 are accidentally loosened, the inherent torque produced by the load-bearing arm on the bracket will cause an immediate binding action to prevent collapse of the structure.

It can further be appreciated that advantage has been taken of the inherent structure of conventional I- beams. Further, brackets 20 are advantageously segments of conventional angle-iron stock which are simply welded to walls 19 of members 18, which, in turn, are standard structural channels. Further, although there is complete adjustability of the height of the loadbearing arms, notice that there are no apertures in the vertical posts or any other modifications that might weaken the structural integrity of any of these members. Finally, note that the I-beam inherently forms two tracks in which the brackets 20 are contained which constitute a guide which the assembler may use to move the horizontal load-bearing arms up and down during assembly and height adjustment. If, due to unforeseen circumstances, there should be a collapse of the structure, these tracks would still contain the load-bearing arms and perhaps prevent the load from being dumped."

The length of the brackets 20 shown in FIG. 4 is merely illustrative of one design that may be used. In actual practice, the brackets 20 may be longer or shorter than shown, and may be mounted asymmetrically with respect to the U-shaped member 18. Member 18, may, of course, alternatively be of a number of other configurations; and L-shaped member may alternatively be used to advantage.

An alternative embodiment is shown in FIG. 5 which comprises a load-bearing member 18A and a pair of brackets 20A which engage side-walls 22A and 23A as described before. However, a U-shaped beam 12A is used rather than an I-beam as the vertical post. In this case, the load-bearing arm 13 comprises a single member 18A which is secured to the vertical post by a U- shaped member 29. Bolts 25A and 26A and nuts 27A operate in the same manner as described before to clamp the load-bearing member to the vertical post.

FIG. 6 shows another embodiment which is identical to FIG. 5 except that a solid bracket member 20B is substituted for the two brackets 20A of FIG. 5. Solid bracket member 20B has inclined surfaces which advantageously match the inclined surfaces of walls 228 and 23B of the vertical post. Thus, when the load-bearing member 18B is clamped to the vertical post, bracket 208 gives the same binding action as was described before, and the same reliable support. It is clear that solid brackets could also be used in conjunction with I-bearh vertical posts; that is, in FIG. 3, solid brackets such as bracket 208 could be substituted for the angle-iron brackets 20 shown in FIG. 3.

From the foregoing it is apparent that numerous other embodiments could alternatively be used if so desired. For example, in FIG. 3, only one of the U-shaped members 18 need be a load-bearing member; the other ments and modifications may be used by those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

What is claimed is:

l. A cantilever storage rack comprising:

a vertical post comprising first and second parallel post walls having opposed inner surfaces joined by a central web, said inner surfaces of the first and second post walls being inclined with respect to the central web;

a substantially horizontal load-bearing arm comprising first and second wall portions adapted to be located on opposite sides of the vertical post parallel to said web;

first and second brackets extending from the first and second wall portions, respectively;

said first bracket bearing against the inner surface of the first post wall;

said second bracket bearing against the inner surface of the second post wall;

the first and second brackets together constituting a wedge with respect to the inner surfaces of the first and second post walls;

and means for clamping the first and second wall portions to the vertical post, thereby to cause the first and second brackets to bear tightly against the inner surfaces of the first and second post walls, respectively.

2. The cantilever storage rack of claim 1 further comprising:

a third bracket extending from the first wall portion and a fourth bracket extending from the second wall portion;

the third bracket bearing against the inner surface of the second post wall and the fourth bracket bearing against the inner surface of the first post wall.

3. A storage rack comprising:

a post adapted to extend in a vertical direction comprising first and second substantially parallel post walls joined by a third post wall;

inner surfaces of the first and second post walls being inclined with respect to the third post wall;

a load-bearing arm comprising first and second wall portions adapted to be located on opposite sides of the vertical posts, said load-bearing arm being adapted to extend in a substantially horizontal direction;

first and second inclined bracket surfaces extending from the first wall portion, and adapted to make contact with the inner inclined surfaces of the first and second post walls, respectively;

means for clamping the first and second wall portions to the vertical post, thereby to cause the first and second bracket surfaces to wedge against the inner surfaces of the first and second post walls;

and a load-bearing member extending from the first wall portion, said load-bearing arm member adapted to extend in a direction substantially perpendicular to the post.

4. The storage rack of claim 3 wherein:

the first and second post walls are joined at ends thereof by the third post wall, whereby the post has a substantially U-shaped cross-section.

5. The cantilever storage rack of claim 3 further comprising:

a second load-bearing member extending from the second wall portion, said second load-bearing member adapted to extend in a direction substantially perpendicular to the post for cantilever storage purposes.

6. The storage rack of claim 3 wherein:

the first and second post walls are joined at their centers by the third post wall, whereby the post consitutes an I-beam;

and further comprising third and fourth inclined bracket surfaces extending from the second wall portion, and adapted to make contact with the inner inclined surfaces of the first and second post walls, respectively.

7. The storage rack of claim 3 further comprising:

a plurality of interconnected posts;

and a plurality of load-bearing arms adapted to be supported by each of the posts, load-bearing arms of adjacent posts being adapted to cooperate in the storage of rigid material therebetween.

8. The storage rack of claim 7 wherein:

the clamping means comprises a first bolt adapted to extend through the first and second wall portions on one side of the post, and a second bolt adapted to extend through the first and second wall portions on the opposite side of the post;

a first nut adapted to engage the first bolt, and a second nut adapted to engage the second bolt.

9. A cantilever storage rack comprising:

a plurality of vertical posts, each comprising first and second post walls joined at their centers by a central web;

inner surfaces of the first and second post walls being inclined with respect to the central web;

a plurality of load-bearing arms attached to each of the vertical posts;

each load-bearing arm comprising first and second wall portions located on opposite sides of a vertical post;

first and second inclined bracket surfaces extending from the first wall portion and making contact with the inner inclined surfaces of the first and second post walls, respectively;

third and fourth inclined bracket surfaces extending from the second wall portion, and making contact with the inner inclined surfaces of the first and second post walls, respectively;

means for clamping the first and second wall portions to the vertical post, thereby causing all of the bracket surfaces to wedge against the inner inclined surfaces of the post walls;

and a load-bearing member extending substantially horizontally from the first wall portion.

10. The cantilever storage rack of claim 9 wherein:

the clamping means comprises a first bolt adapted to extend through the first and second wall portions on one side of the vertical post, and a second bolt adapted to extend through the first and second wall portions on the opposite side of the vertical post;

a first nut adapted to engage the first bolt, and a second nut adapted to engage the second bolt.

11. The cantilever storage rack of claim 10 wherein:

the first and second inclined bracket surfaces respectively constitute part of first and second brackets extending from the first wall portion;

and the third and fourth bracket surfaces respectively constitute part of third and fourth brackets extending from the second wall portion.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2930488 *Nov 27, 1956Mar 29, 1960Best & Sons Inc John HStorage racks
US3251478 *Dec 9, 1964May 17, 1966Donald FrazierCantilever rack
US3335992 *Nov 23, 1965Aug 15, 1967Donald FrazierClamping brackets for a rack structure
US3489291 *May 26, 1967Jan 13, 1970Frazier DonaldRack structure
US3698566 *Jan 7, 1971Oct 17, 1972Altrui Thomas N DDemountable cantilever storage racks
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4447029 *Apr 12, 1982May 8, 1984Keith Hancock Structures LimitedLoad support arrangement
US4519512 *Dec 20, 1982May 28, 1985Donald FrazierCantilever rack construction
EP0068812A1 *Jun 23, 1982Jan 5, 1983Keith Hancock Structures LimitedLoad support arrangement
WO1983000008A1 *Jun 23, 1982Jan 6, 1983Hancock Keith StructuresLoad support arrangement
Classifications
U.S. Classification211/193, 248/245, 403/188
International ClassificationA47B57/00, A47B57/56, A47F5/10
Cooperative ClassificationA47B57/562, A47F5/10
European ClassificationA47F5/10, A47B57/56A
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Oct 31, 1985AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: D ALTRUI INDUSTRIES, A CORP OF NJ.
Owner name: WOODRUFF ACQUISITION CORP., A CORP OF NEW JERSEY
Effective date: 19850801
Oct 31, 1985ASAssignment
Owner name: WOODRUFF ACQUISITION CORP., A CORP OF NEW JERSEY
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:D ALTRUI INDUSTRIES, A CORP OF NJ.;REEL/FRAME:004472/0380
Effective date: 19850801