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Publication numberUS3919039 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 11, 1975
Filing dateSep 10, 1973
Priority dateSep 12, 1972
Also published asDE2340103A1, DE2340103B2
Publication numberUS 3919039 A, US 3919039A, US-A-3919039, US3919039 A, US3919039A
InventorsRohner Hans
Original AssigneePolytex Ag
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for making swatch cards
US 3919039 A
Abstract
An apparatus for making textile swatch cards has a table provided with a gluing station and an attachment station. A platen is horizontally slidable above the table in a pair of guides which are vertically reciprocal to bring the platen down on top of the stations. The gluing station comprises either an array of felt or sponge blocks in a glue-filled tray or a screen-printing device on the platen. The attachment station has a pegboard support for stacks of swatches. The platen is pushed back from above the stations and a clear card is laid on the gluing station. The platen is then dropped to spot the card with glue according to a predetermined pattern. This glued card is then placed, glue side down, in the attachment station where it is pressed against the stacks of swatches the next time the platen drops so as to pick up the uppermost swatch in each stack.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191 Rohner 1 1 APPARATUS FOR MAKING SWATCH CARDS [75] Inventor:

[73] Assignee: Polytex A.G.,Glattbrugg.

Switzerland [221 Filed: Sept. 10, 1973 [211 Appl. No: 396,048

Hans Rohner, Kuttigen. Switzerland [301 Foreign Application Priorit Data Sept. 12. 1972 Snitzerland (113367172 152] US. Cl. [56/562; 100/226; 101/123;

156] References Cited UNlTED STATES PATENTS 596.977 1/1898 Bradt 156/561 644.398 2/19UU Bradt .1 156/561 1.126.003 1/1915 Graul 156/561 1.943.390 1/1934 Oser 156/565 1451 Nov. 11,1975

2681.097 611954 Gra} 1561558 2.881.698 4/1959 Graham 11111123 3.327.627 6. 1967 Melton 11111 123 [5 7] ABSTRACT An apparatus for making textile swatch cards has a table provided with a gluing station and an attachment station. A platen is horizontally slidahle above the table in a pair of guides which are vertically reciprocal to bring the platen down on top of the stations. The gluing station comprises either an array of felt or sponge blocks in a glue-filled tray or a screen-printing device on the platen. The attachment station has a pegboard support for stacks of swatches. The platen is pushed back from above the stations and a clear card is laid on the gluing station. The platen is then dropped to spot the card with glue according to a pre determined pattern. This glued card is then placed. glue side down. in the attachment station where it is pressed against the stacks of swatches the next time the platen drops so as to pick up the uppermost swatch in each stack.

10 Claims. 8 Drawing Figures US. Patent N0v.11,1975 Sheetl0f3 3,919,039

US. Patent Nov. 11, 1975 Sheet 2 013 3,919,039

U.S. Patent Nov. 11, 1975 Sheet 3 of3 3,919,039

APPARATUS FOR MAKING SWATCH CARDS FIELD OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to an apparatus for assembling swatch sample cards. More particularly this invention concerns an apparatus for bonding textile swatches to cards for display of the textiles.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION A textile sample card has a plurality of swatches which are adhesively bonded to a paper card. Identifying indicia is printed on the card so that the prospective customer can see just how the textiles look and feel and then make his order according to the given information. A textile manufacturer generally produces new lines of fabrics several times a year, so that he must periodically send out new swatch sample cards to his customers.

Such cards can be made by hand by painstakingly gluing the swatches to a card. This method is quite expensive so that recourse is normally had to automatic machinery which is loaded with stacks of swatches and with the printed cards and then glues the swatches to the cards in the desired positions. Such machinery is quite expensive, however, so that a small textile mill is forced to choose between the expensive alternatives of either buying such a machine and letting it stand idle most of the time or having the swatch cards prepared by a jobber.

OBJECTS OF THE INVENTION It is therefore an object of the present invention to provide an improved apparatus for assembling swatch cards.

Another object is the provision of such an apparatus which is relatively simple and therefore inexpensive to buy and use.

A further object is to provide a swatch-card making machine which can be used to produce all types of cards from different sized swatches and support cards.

Yet another object is to provide a machine which can employ gum-arabic types of adhesives particularly adapted for use on thin textiles.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION These objects are attained according to the present invention in an apparatus wherein a table has a gluing station and an attachment station. Adhesive is applied to the cards according to a predetermined pattern at the gluing station and the swatches are then applied to the glued areas in the attachment station. A platen is displaceable in horizontal guides above the stations into a rearward position giving access to the stations and a forward position above and covering these stations. Means is provided to vertically reciprocate this platen in its forward position so as to simultaneously press a card down in the gluing station and to press a glued card down in the attachment station in a single operation.

Such an apparatus is quite versatile since the arrangement of the stacks of swatches in the attachment station on the table can be easily changed. Similarly the glue-applying means in the gluing station can be changed so as to apply the glue to the cards in virtually any desired arrangement. The operator of the machine takes the glued card out of the gluing station and sets it against a set of stops in the attachment station, and

places a new clean card in a predetermined position in the gluing station. The cards. according to another feature of this invention. can be removed from the attachment station automatically and dropped in a stack.

The gluing means at the gluing station may be an adhesive-filled tray provided with a plurality of felt or sponge blocks arranged in a predetermined array and projecting above the rim of the tray. The unglucd card is held on a vertically displaceable rack above the tray so that when the platen presses it down it receives gluc at predetermined locations as it is pressed against the blocks. Alternatively the card is held in the gluing station and a screen-printing type of glue applicator, which is carried on the platen. presses against it and applies glue to it in predetermined locations. depending on the screen.

The attachment station according to this invention supports a plurality of stacks of swatches. This station has a pegboard type of bed on which stops or guides are releasably attached for exactly positioning the stacks of swatches according to the desired position. Springloaded pins engageable through the bed with the undersides of the stacks insure that each stack is pressed firmly against the glued card when the platen presses this card down against the stacks. The bed spring loaded and vertically displaceable so that as the glued card is pressed down on the tops of the stacks it presses these stacks and their bed down against the springloaded pins to press and glue the top swatch of each stack to the appropriate area of the glued card.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING The above and other objects. features. and advantages of the invention will become more readily apparent from the following description, reference being made to the accompanying drawing in which:

FIG. I is a perspective view of the apparatus according to the present invention;

FIGS. 2 and 3 are front sectional and top views. respectively, of the gluing station of the apparatus of FIG. 1;

FIGS. 4 and 5 are views similar to those of FIGS. 2 and 3, respectively, of the attachment station of the apparatus of FIG. 1;

FIG. 6 is a vertical section through another embodiment of the apparatus of this invention; and

FIGS. 7 and 8 are schematic diagrams illustrating the functioning of the machines of FIGS. 1 and 6, respectively.

SPECIFIC DESCRIPTION The apparatus according to this invention has a housing 1 whose top is formed as a table 40 on which are provided a gluing station 4 and an attachment station 5. A large rectangular traverse or platen 2 is shiftable on wheels 20 inside guide channels 3 carried on blocks 30 which are vertically reciprocal on guide rods 6 by means of a piston rod 7 of a pneumatic ram (not shown). The platen 2 can be displaced manually by means of handles 2 associated with buttons 2" both of which must be pressed to actuate the piston rod 7 to drop the platen 2 down onto the table 1. Other controls 11 are provided on the housing 1 which operate a cylinder 31 which reciprocates the platen 2 horizontally in the guides 3 between the back position illustrated in FIG. 1 and a forward position above the stations 4 and 5. Again dual controls are provided to prevent the operator's hands from getting caught in the machine.

As shown in FIGS. 2 and 3 the table 40 is provided at the glueing station 4 with a tray 4] partially filled with glue L. A plurality of felt blocks 42 are fixed to the tray in a pattern determined by the type of swatch card to be made. A rack or grid 43 having thin cross members 47 is supported above the tray 41 on four rods 44 slidable in sleeves 45 underneath the table 40. Springs 46 in these sleeves 45 urge the rods upwardly into the illustrated positions. The blocks 42 project up beyond the tray 41 by a distance greater than the vertical thickness of the cross members 47 so that when this rack 43 is dropped down on top of the tray 41 the blocks 42 project through it.

The attachment station shown in FIGS. 4 and com prises a pegboard type of perforated support 5] formed with a regular array of throughgoing holes 49 which register with a similar array of holes 56 in the table 40 underneath it. This support has sides 50 supported on rods 58 slidable in sleeves 59 like the rods 44 of the grid 43. A stack of swatches M is held between four stops or blocks 52 formed with pins 53 which fit snugly in the holes 49 so that this stack of swatches M may be positioned virtually anywhere on the board 51. Rods 54 slidable in tubes 55 having collars 48 overlying the table 40 are spring-loaded like the rods 44 so as to project up from whatever hole the tube 55 is fitted to. A piece 57 of cardboard or the like underneath the stack of swatches M is engaged by the pins 54 when the support Si is pressed down by the platen 2 to force this stack up against the underside of a card. The platen 2 is hollow and is formed above the station 5 with a plurality of holes 12 so that when a pump 13 is connected to it a finished card can be picked up.

This device is operated as follows, as shown in FIG. 7:

A printed card K from a stack of such cards is positioned face down against stops 39 on the cross members 47 of the rack 43. This insures an accurate positioning of the card K Then the platen 2 is placed into the forward position above the stations 4 and 5 and this platen is dropped. As it descends it first engages the back of the card K, and then presses the rack 43 down until the front of the card presses against the blocks 42 and takes up glue as shown at L.

The platen 2 is then lifted and displaced either manually or mechanically into the back position illustrated in FIG. I and the operator positions the glued card K still face down atop the several stacks of swatches M in a position determined by stops similar to the stops 39 or by markings. A new card K, is also set in the station 4 at this time.

The mechanism is then actuated to advance the platen 2, or this platen 2 is simply pulled forward, and again it is dropped to first engage the sheet, then press the entire support 5] down. The stacks of swatches M are pushed into firm contact with the glued regions of the card K, as shown at M. The platen 2 is then lifted and pushed back and the finished card MK is deposited face up on a pile by the operator, or the pump 13 can remove it from the station 5 automatically. The card K is then moved forward from the station 4 and a new card K is placed in this station 4.

FIG. 6 shows the left half of a platen 2' which is provided with a screen-printing arrangement useful for applying a gum-arabic or thick synthetic-resin type of glue L to the card K. in this embodiment the table 60 is hollow and formed with a multiplicity of tiny holes 61 so that constant evacuation of the interior of the table 60 holds the card K firmly in place.

A screen 62 spanned under a frame 63 constitutes the bottom of the platen 2' in the region of the station 4. A doctor-blade unit 64 has a body 641 slidable back and forth on the platen 2' on rods 642. A pair of rubber doctor blades 644 and 645 are carried on a support 646 pivoted on the on the slide 641 at 643. A chain 67 driven by a motor 65 and spanned over a sprocket wheel 66 carried by this motor 65 and over an idler sprocket 68 adjustable at 649 for chain tension is connected to the pivotal support 646 at 647. A pair of adjustable stops 648 allow the support 646 to pivot through an angle a bisected by the vertical so that when the motor 65 is operated in one direction to pull the entire unit 64 toward itself the blade 645 serves to squeegee the glue L' through the screen 62 in those regions where it is permeable. Opposite operation of the motor, to advance the unit in the direction of arrow v tips the support 646 through angle a to pick up the mass of glue L' with the squeegee 644. The illustrated position is that one assumed at the end of a glue application cycle. Direction v is also the direction of displacement of the entire traverse 2' into the forward position.

This arrangement functions differently from the arrangement described with reference to FIG. 7. As shown in FIG. 8 a card K is placed front face up in the station 4 and glue L is applied to its top face. The glued card K, is then inverted and the swatches M are applied to it in the same manner as in FIG. 7. Thereafter the swatch-carrying card K is inverted and placed in the stack of finished cards MK.

The present invention allows a swatch card carrying swatches in virtually any pattern to be made in house by a textile manufacturer in a relatively inexpensive and easy-to-operate machine. A conventional solventtype glue L may be employed or a gum-arabic or synthetic-resin type of glue L for thinner swatches or for fabrics which do not readily take glue, such as synthetic-resin knits. The machine can be set up in a brief time by any average worker, and thereafter approximately three hundred swatch cards can be produced per hour.

I claim:

1. An apparatus for assembling swatch sample cards comprising:

a housing having a generally horizontal table;

a fixed gluing station at one side of said table having a support for a card;

means for applying adhesive to a card at said gluing station;

a fixed attachment station on said table adjacent said gluing station and having a support for at least one stack of swatches;

a horizontal guide on said housing;

a platen slidable on said guide between a forward position overlying and spanning said stations and a back position giving access to said stations; and

means for vertically displacing said platen in said forward position down toward said stations for pressing an unglued card into said gluing station and thereby applying glue thereto and for pressing a glued card down onto said stack of swatches.

2. The apparatus defined in claim 1 wherein said means for applying adhesive includes an adhesivecontaining tray on said table at said gluing station, and

a plurality of compressible and absorbent bodies in said tray projecting upwardly beyond the rim thereof whereby a card pressed against said blocks is coated with glue adhesive where it engages said cards.

3. The apparatus defined in claim 2 wherein the card support comprises a rack above said tray and means for supporting said rack for vertical displacement toward and away from said tray.

4. The apparatus defined in claim 1 wherein said means for applying adhesive includes a screen-printer on said platen 5. The apparatus defined in claim 1 wherein the swatch support at said attachment station is formed with array of holes and said attachment station includes a plurality of positioning blocks releasably secured in some of said holes and acting as lateral guides for said stack.

6. The apparatus defined in claim 5 wherein said swatch support is vertically reciprocal relative to said table and includes spring means for normally holding said swatch support in an upper position spaced above said table. said swatch support being downwardly depressable by said platen against the force of said spring means.

7. The apparatus defined in claim 6 wherein said swatch support further comprises at least one pin secured on said table and engageable through one of said holes with the underside of said stack for urging same into contact with said glued card on depression of said swatch support.

8. The apparatus defined in claim 6 wherein said swatch support has a uniform array of said holes 9. The apparatus defined in claim 1 wherein said platen is formed above said attachment station as a ho]- low body with a plurality of downwardly directed holes. and is provided with means for drawing air from said body to lift a card from said attachment station.

10. The apparatus defined in claim I, further comprising means for displacing said platen between said forward position and said back position

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US596977 *May 22, 1896Jan 11, 1898Georgianna BradtApparatus foe attaching color
US644398 *Oct 8, 1898Feb 27, 1900Georgianna BradtMachine for attaching color specimens to sample-cards.
US1126003 *Feb 16, 1912Jan 26, 1915Feodor GraulMachine for pasting pieces of goods on sample-cards.
US1943390 *Sep 26, 1931Jan 16, 1934Alfred OserApparatus for mounting samples on cards and the like
US2681097 *Jan 6, 1951Jun 15, 1954Injection Molding CompanyMachine for autogenously sealing together parts of an article formed of a synthetic plastic material
US2881698 *Jul 19, 1956Apr 14, 1959Kenn Equipment CoScreen process printing machine
US3327627 *Sep 2, 1964Jun 27, 1967Southerr Powell CorpWeb screen printing machine
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4212699 *Aug 17, 1978Jul 15, 1980Georg Fischer Brugg - Oehler AGApparatus for assembling planar work pieces
US4252597 *Jan 19, 1976Feb 24, 1981Monroe James MSplicing machine and method
US4643795 *May 15, 1985Feb 17, 1987Ab BiodiskAntibiotic patches or test strips on receiving adhesive surface
US4648317 *May 7, 1985Mar 10, 1987American Screen Printing Equipment Co.Manually operated screen printing apparatus
US4701964 *Jul 29, 1986Oct 27, 1987International Playtex, Inc.Garment having additional support to selected portions
US4776916 *Sep 2, 1987Oct 11, 1988Playtex Apparel, Inc.Applying powdered adhesive using continuous conveyor; loading, curing, positioning and removal; undergarment support
US6416612 *Jun 9, 1999Jul 9, 2002Color Communications, Inc.Method of making a color display device
EP0255101A2 *Jul 27, 1987Feb 3, 1988Playtex Apparel, Inc.Method and apparatus for providing additional support to selected portions of a garment and garment produced thereby
EP1481815A1 *May 28, 2004Dec 1, 2004Color Communications, Inc.Method and apparatus for high speed mounting and printing of colored chips on a sheet
Classifications
U.S. Classification156/562, 156/548, 156/277, 101/123, 270/58.17, 156/228, 100/226, 156/241, 156/561, 156/580, 101/287, 156/565
International ClassificationB65H37/04
Cooperative ClassificationB65H37/04
European ClassificationB65H37/04