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Publication numberUS3921318 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 25, 1975
Filing dateJan 22, 1973
Priority dateJan 22, 1973
Publication numberUS 3921318 A, US 3921318A, US-A-3921318, US3921318 A, US3921318A
InventorsAnthony Calavetta
Original AssigneeAnthony Calavetta
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Body-carried medical history card
US 3921318 A
Abstract
A body-carried medical history card has a visible indicia bearing portion with identification data and critical medical data and has a medical record microfilm bearing portion with one or more strips of laterally connected microfilm frames of a self-proofed medical history. Visible indicia and microfilm frames are integrally formed as images in a thick piece of film which is carried on the person of the subject of the medical data. The card is made by reducing identified and certified medical history pages and producing a strip of microfilm frames of those pages. A jacket having an opaque area is printed with visible indicia such as the identification of the person and critical medical data taken from the medical history pages. The microfilm is fitted in a sleeve within the jacket and a heavy diazo film is exposed through the jacket using ultraviolet light. The heavy film is then developed with visible indicia and microfilm images produced within the film spaced from edges and surfaces. A backing is added, and the visible indicia are read against the backing. A magnetic tape is added for storing machine readable information. In a dog tag size card, the microfilm frames are arranged in a substantially square area in the tag-card, and a hole for receiving a body member encircling chain penetrates the visible indicia bearing portion.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1 1 Calavetta [4 1 Nov. 25, 1975 1 i BODY-CARRIED MEDICAL HISTORY CARD [76] Inventor: Anthony Calavetta, 1554 Wilhemina Rise, Honolulu, Hawaii 96817 [22] Filed: Jan. 22, 1973 [21] Appl. No.: 325,943

[52] US. Cl. 40/2.2; 40/158 B; 283/7 [51] Int. Cl? G09F 3/02 [58'] Field of Search 40/2.2, 158, 158 B, 135; 283/7 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,696,489 12/1928 Kahn 40/135 2,594,903 4/1952 Freedman... 40/135 3,152,901 10/1964 Johnson 40/2.2 X 3,180,042 4/1965 Destal 40/10 R 3,571,957 3/1971 Cumming... 283/7 X 3,601,913 8/1971 Pollock 40/2.2 3,732,640 5/1973 Changnon... 283/7 X 3,750,315 8/1973 Anderson 40/158 B 3,758,970 9/1973 Annengberg i. 40/2.2

FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 702,905 2/1965 Canada 40/158 B Primary Examiner-Melvin D. Rein Assistant ExaminerWenceslao J. Contreras Attorney, Agent, or FirmJames C. Wray [57] ABSTRACT A body-carried medical history card has a visible indicia bearing portion with identification data and critical medical data and has a medical record microfilm bearing portion with one or more strips of laterally connected microfilm frames of a self-proofed medical history. Visible indicia and microfilm frames are integrally formed as images in a thick piece of film which is carried on the person of the subject of the medical data. The card is made by reducing identified and certified medical history pages and producing a strip of microfilm frames of those pages. A jacket having an opaque area is printed with visible indicia such as the identification of the person and critical medical data taken from the medical history pages. The microfilm is fitted in a sleeve within the jacket and a heavy diazo film is exposed through the jacket using ultraviolet light. The heavy film is then developed with visible indicia and microfilm images produced within the film spaced from edges and surfaces. A backing is added, and the visible indicia are read against the backing. A magnetic tape is added for storing machine readable information. In a dog tag size card, the microfilm frames are arranged in a substantially square area in the tag-card, and a hole for receiving a body member encircling chain penetrates the visible indicia bearing portion.

9 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures U.S. Patent Nov. 25, 1975 FIG. 4

Sheet 1 of 2 FIG. 5

BODY-CARRIED MEDICALHISTORY CARD BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION One experiences many occasions for theimmediate need of detailed medical records. In emergency situations, there is no summary for detailed medical histories which can readily supply critical data concerning histories, allergies, specific diseases and other information which medical personnel need to know. The availability of such data often means the difference between life and serious injury or death. When someone is critically injured, unconscious, or in a coma, detailed medical background is essential. Without such background, dangerous treatments may be avoided or may be undertaken on a balance of risk basis. Rare blood types, potentially dangerous allergies or unseen medical problems are extremely important when emergency treatment is required. It is important that one treating a patient know of general medical problems, medicines or drugstaken regularly, drug allergy and reaction and other non-critical but essential information. Wearing of dentures, contact lenses, immunizations and dates are extremely important. I

When one visits a new doctor, or seeks treatment in clinics or hospitals, it may take from about 15 minutes to an hour or more to fill out forms and questionnaires, to check sources and facts and to check the accuracy and completeness of details. Often it is'necessary to check with doctors and other clinics to insure completeness.

Heretofore no body-carried card has been provided with the complete medical history and records of persons and with alerts to possible dangerous problems and conditions of the persons.-

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention provides a product to eliminate the existing problems of general inavailability of medical records at critical times and at times requiring use. Medical history record cards of the present invention are provided in the form of wallet-sized cards with a large area which contains visually accessible information and with another area which contains microfilm records which are usable on conventional microfilm readers and printers.

In another form of the invention, the microfilm medical history records are mounted in dog tags which carry visible indicia, such as the name and serial number of the bearer.

In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the microfilm frames are mounted side by side in one or more rows. The microfilm images are deeply embedded in the cards to prevent their destruction or reduction in legibility.

In one embodiment of the invention, microfilm images and images of visible indicia are produced deep within the body of a heavy-duty film which comprises the chief substance of the card. In another embodiment of the invention, heavy-duty microfilm images are mounted within recessed areas of a card and are completely outwardly surrounded by thicknesses of the card which carry visible indicia.

In a preferred embodiment of the invention, multiple side-by-side arranged frames of microfilm are oriented parallel to an elongated edge of the card. The frames occupy one strip along the card, and the remainder of the card is devoted to visually accessible indicia. The

latter contains information on the identification of the card bearer and unique and important medical features such as diseases. allergies and conditions. When the card is configured for carrying as a dog tag. a hole is provided in the indicia bearing portion for inserting a neck-surrounding chain. Usually, the microfilm frames are arranged in two rows of three frames in a generally square recessed area within the tag. Either the entire visual indicia bearing portion is enlarged and reinforced, or the part immediately surrounding the neck chain opening is strengthened.

In a preferred form of constructing the unique card, a card bearer personally fills out information on presupplied medical history forms and inserts his identification or his identification number. such as his social security number on each side of each page of the form and signs each side after carefully proofing the information contained thereon. The forms are then mailed to a central location, where the forms are photographed and reduced, producing a continuous strip of microfilm having several side-by-side frames. At the same time, identification from the medical records and critical medical information which is taken from a particular part of the history form are typed on an opaque or frosted area ofa film strip receiving jacket. The film strip is carefully matched with the jacket, when inserting the stip in a sleeve along a bottom edge of the jacket. The entire assembly is placed against a heavy duty, relatively thick diazo film, and the film is exposed to ultraviolet light. Upon developing the film. a card is formed. A coating material, such as a lacquer or spray. brush or roller applied paint, may be applied to a rear side of the film card to provide a background for the visually accessible images. A reinforcing overlay may be provided, and signature strips and magnetic information coding strips may be added to the rear of the card.

The coating material which is applied to the card may.

be applied in the form of a printed sheet. which is laminated, such as by bonding to thc film card back on the portion which bears the visual indicia.

The card or "dog tag is provided with attention drawing colors and words to aid in its recognition. When a wallet size card is in use, items of body or clothing adornment may call attention to its presence.

One object of the present ivention is the provision of a body-carried microfilm medical record card.

Another object of this invention is the provision of a body-carried medical record microfilm card having microfilm frames arranged in a side-by-side strip parallel to one edge of the card and having visible bearer identification indicia and critical medical information on a contiguous portion of the card.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a body-carried medical record card having microfilm frames developed as images within a film and having visible indicia developed as images within the same film.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a body-carried medical record card having microfilm medical records embodied in a card and having visible medical records embodied in a card and having visible indicia embodied in another portion of the card, with a backing coating behind the visible indicia and with a magnetic tape strip on the card for receiving and holdingmagnetic coded data.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a dog tag which a reinforced visible indicia bearing por- 3 tion having a hole for receiving a neck chain and having a recessed microfilm bearing portion for carrying medi cal records on a body.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a method for making a body-carried medical record card comprising photographing and reducing proofed and signed records on pre-determined forms. printing identification and medical problem data on a jacket. inserting microfilm bearing the medical record in a pocket on the jacket. placing the jacket adjacent a diazo film having substantial thickness. exposing the film through the jacket and developing the film as a body-carried card.

These and other objects and features of the invention are apparent in the disclosure. which includes the drawings and the foregoing and ongoing specification with its claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is an elevation of a body-carried microfilm medical record card.

FIG. 2 is a detail of microfilm and visual indicia images within the card which is shown in side elevation.

FIG. 3 is a detail of a card constructed according to FIG. I and having a rear coating over the visual indicia bearing portion of the card and having a magnetic tape strip on the card.

FIG. 4 is an elevation of a second embodiment of a card having more than one row of side-by-side micro film frames.

FIG. 5 is an elevational representation of a dog tag modification of the card.

FIG. 6 is a schematic representative of the steps in producing the body-carried microfilm medical record card shown in FIG. 1.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS With reference to FIG. I, a body-carried microfilm medical record card is generally indicated by the numeral l. The card has a visual indicia bearing portion 2 on which printed identification 4. such as name. address. telephone number and social security number is indicated. and critical medical information 6, which are readily accessible to an observer of the card. A microfilm medical record bearing portion 8 of the card contains frames of microfilm medical records 10 arranged in side-by-side position parallel to one longitudinal edge 12 of the card. For redundant checking. each frame 10 contains the full name of the person as well as his signature.

As shown in FIG. 2, the card 1 is constructed as an integral piece of film with visual indicia images 14 and microfilm images 16 in the interior of the transparent film card. extended inward from the front surface 18 and spaced inward from rear face 20.

As shown in FIG. 3, the rear face 20 is coated at the upper visual indicia bearing portion 2 with a coating 22 which highlights the visual indicia and promotes their legibility through the front face of card 1. Coating 22 may be a sprayed. brushed or rolledon settable liquid coating or may be an etched on otherwise frosted surface or may be a treated sheet which is self adhered or otherwise laminated to rear face 20 of card 1. Printing may be carried on the coating 22 to indicate general or particular information concerning the card or its bearer.

As shown in the drawing. coating 22 has an adhesive back 24 which sticks to card 1 in a permanent manner.

4 Coating 22 may have a frosted signature area 28 which carries a signature. indicating that the information supplied on the card is correct and authorizing its use in any situation.

A magnetic tape strip 26 is adhered to card I or its coating 22 to hold magnetically coded data concerning the patient. such as identifying the location of his re cords.

In the modification shown in FIG. 4. two parallel lines 30 of microfilm frames 10 are incorporated in a single card 32. The upper indicia bearing portion 34 of the card may be smaller than the lower microfilm medical record bearing portion 36.

A dog tag modification of the invention is shown in FIG. 5. Dog tag 40 has a strong. relatively thick visual indicia bearing portion 42 which encircles the periphery of the card. A generally square microfilm medical record bearing portion 44 has two rows 46. each having three side-by-side frames 10 of medical records. The visual indicia bearing portion 42 has a hole 48 for receiving a neck encircling chain. Dog tag 40 is completed by a conventional clamping slot 49.

With reference to FIG. 6, a process for producing the body-carried microfilm medical record card is described. A bearer personally completes a group of supplied medical history forms 50., printing his name on line 52 and signing the form on line 54 on each page. The history forms are mailed to a central processing area where they are reduced to a continuous strip 56 of side-by-side microfilm frames 10. A jacket 58 is printed with identification 62 taken from the form and critical medical information 64 taken from a predetermined area of the form. Microfilm strip 56 is slid into pocket 66 ofjacket 58. and the jacket is placed against a thick rectangular card 68 of diazo film. The film 68 is exposed through jacket 58 in an exposing device 70. Exposed film 72 is passed into developer 74, and microfilm medical record card 1 emerges. The visual indicia receiving portion 2 carries identification information 4 and critical medical information 6. The microfilm bearing portion 8 carries the adjacent frames 10 of the medical histories.

While this invention has been described with specific reference to example. it will be obvious to one skilled in the art that modifications and variations may be contstructed without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. The scope of the invention is defined in the following claims.

I claim:

1. A medical history identification card comprising a body-carried generally rectangular unitary integrally formed card having a human visually readable visible indicia bearing first portion. visible indicia photographically disposed in the first portion, and having a medical record microfilm bearing integrally formed second integral portion and medical microfilm records photographically disposed in the second portion. wherein the medical record microfilm bearing portion is recessed from outer surfaces of the visible indicia bearing portion. whereby visible indicia on the card are immediately accessible for information to its bearer. medical personnel and others. and wherein medical records are immediately available to medical personnel having microfilm readers and printers. and whereby bearer indicia and microfilm records are concurrently affixed for avoiding erroneously entered data.

2. The medical history card of claim 1 wherein the visible indicia bearing portion occupies a relatively large section of the unitary integrally formed film card and wherein the medical microfilm record bearing portion occupies a relatively small section of the card.

3. The medical history card of claim 1 wherein the visible indicia bearing portion occupies an upper twothirds of a wallet-size unitary integrally formed film card and wherein the medical history microfilm portion occupies a lower third of the wallet-size card.

4. The medical history card of claim 1 wherein the card is a photographic flat film with visibly legible indicia disposed as photographic images within the film and wherein medical microfilm records are formed as photographic images within the film.

5. The medical history card of claim 4 wherein the photographic images are spaced inward from outer walls of the film.

6. The medical history card of claim 4 further comprising a backing coating overlying a back side of the visible indicia bearing portion. whereby photographic integrally 6 image indicia may be read against the background of the coating.

7. The medical history card of claim 1 further comprising a magnetic tape strip on a rear surface thereof parallel to one elongated edge of the card in an area on a back of the first portion.

8. The medical history card of claim 1 wherein the medical microfilm bearing portion comprises a plurality of microfilm frames integrally formed and photo graphically imposed in the card in side-by-side arrangement positioned in a strip parallel to a longitudinal edge of the unitary card.

9. The medical history card of claim 1 further comprising a hole in the visible indicia bearing portion for affixing a neck-encircling chain and a clamping slot in an edge near the hole. and wherein the medical record microfilm bearing portion comprises a generally square portion whereby the device is configured and is carried

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Classifications
U.S. Classification40/626, 283/85, 283/76, 283/75, 235/493, 283/82, 283/900, 40/628
International ClassificationB42D15/10, G06K19/06
Cooperative ClassificationB42D2035/10, B42D2035/18, B42D2035/08, G06K19/06046, B42D2031/12, B42D2033/22, B42D15/10, Y10S283/90, B42D2031/20, B42D2037/02, B42D2035/44, B42D2033/16, B42D2031/28, B42D2031/34
European ClassificationG06K19/06C5, B42D15/10