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Publication numberUS3921358 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 25, 1975
Filing dateNov 15, 1974
Priority dateDec 5, 1969
Publication numberUS 3921358 A, US 3921358A, US-A-3921358, US3921358 A, US3921358A
InventorsPhillip S Bettoli
Original AssigneeGaf Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Composite shingle
US 3921358 A
Abstract
A composite roofing shingle includes a rectangular sheet having a butt portion which is divided into spacedapart tabs and an elongated strip which is secured to the butt portion underlying at least one of the tabs. In a first embodiment, the elongated strip is interwoven with successive tabs; in a second embodiment, the tabs are spaced apart from each other at a distance approximating their widths and the strip is secured to the sheet in a position underlying the tabs and filling the spaces therebetween.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Bettoli 51 Nov. 25, 1975 [5 1 COMPOSITE SHINGLE 1,870,414 8/1932 Levin 52/559 1,873,944 8/1932 Black 52/559 [75] inventor. Ph1ll1p S. Bettoll, Mart1nv11le, NJ. 2170010 8/1939 Scheutz et 8L 52/599 73 Assigneez GAF Corporation, New York 2,194,427 3/1940 Kirschbraun 52/420 2,199,760 5/1940 Scheutz 52/599 [22] Filed: Nov. 15, 1974 [21] Appl. No.: 524,158 Primary Examiner-Henry C. Sutherland Related U.S. Application Data Continuation of Ser. No. 882,654, Dec. 5, 1969, abandoned, which is a continuation of Ser. No. 644,296, June 7, 1967, abandoned.

[52] U.S. Cl. 52/314; 52/419; 52/555; 52/557 [51] Int. Cl. E04D l/26; EO4D H36 [58] Field of Search 52/311, 314, 419, 420, 52/454-459 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,531,151 6/1921 Steele 52/559 1,593,096 7/1926 Munro 52/557 Attorney, Agent, or FirmPennie & Edmonds [57] ABSTRACT A composite roofing shingle includes a rectangular sheet having a butt portion which is divided into spacedapart tabs and an elongated strip which is secured to the butt portion underlying at least one of the tabs. in a first embodiment, the elongated strip is interwoven with successive tabs; in a second embodiment, the tabs are spaced apart from each other at a distance approximating their widths and the strip is secured to the sheet in a position underlying the tabs and filling the spaces therebetween.

22 Claims, 10 Drawing Figures U.S. Patent Nov. 25, 1975 Sheet10f4 3,921,358

US. Patent Nov. 25, 1975 Sheet20f4 3,921,358

FIG. 2A

Sheet 3 of 4 3,921,358

U..S. Patent Nov. 25, 1975 US. Patent Nov. 25, 1975 Sheet40f4 3,921,358

COMPOSITE SHINGLE CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION This is a continuation, Ser. No. 882,654, filed Dec. 5, 1969, now abandoned which is continuation-in-part of Ser. No. 644,296, filed Jun. 7, 1967, now abandoned.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to a roofing shingle and, more particularly, to a weather-resistant composite asphaltimpregnated roofing shingle and a method for manufacturing the shingle.

Roofing shingles comprising felt or fabric stock impregnated with asphalt and covered with colored mineral granules are well known. Heretofore they have served as relatively inexpensive alternatives to tile, slate and wood roofing shingles. Although asphalt shingles are fire-resistant, give good protection and are durable, their substantially planar appearance has made them less pleasing to the eye and less imposing than their more expensive counterparts.

Asphalt shingles having areas of different colors have not been successfully made heretofore with a sharp vertical line of demarcation between the colors because the normal method of distributing the colored granules results in a transitional area between colors. Thus they do not present the sharply defined variegation of colors which is possible with abutting wooden shingles. Further, the application of excess granules and the subsequent removal and reuse of the unembedded granules often results in undesirable mixtures of granules sizes and colors. Due to this uncontrolled variation in surface texture and color, unsightly off color areas which are caused either by color differences or by differences in the light reflective characteristics of granules of different sizes imbedded in the shingle may appear at random on the shingle surface.

Asphalt shingles heretofore available are at a competitive disadvantage with the more expensive roofing shingles because they lack the irregular, bulky. butt edge profile and surface contour which is characteristic of roofs of wood shingles. Additionally, the installation of conventional asphalt shingles is tedious and time consuming because such shingles are applied in a regular pattern which requires precise alignment of adjacent courses. Particular care must be taken in the proper alignment of conventional shingles when the roof deck includes a dormer or a chimney because shingles at either side of the dormer must meet at its vertex and be disposed uniformly upwardly on the deck to the ridge of the roof; also, such shingles must fit in a manner which enables the proper alignment of cutouts in the courses above the dormer. Finally, the shingles at the ends of each course of shingles must be cut to conform with the edge of the roof deck. Frequently, the projecting excess portion of a conventional shingle is not severed at the cut-out space between adjacent tabs with the result that in most instances such excess portion must be discarded or trimmed to eliminate the fractional tab. The wastage involved increases costs and the trimming procedures are unduly timeconsuming.

Many futile attempts have been made in the prior art to provide asphalt shingles which would achieve the substantial structural and architectural appearance characteristic of wood roofing shingles. For example,

the prior art suggests that an asphalt shingle may be endowed with a massive ornamental effect by securing an additional strip beneath the closely spaced tabs of a conventional shingle. However, the structure which is obtained, although massive, still provides only the re gular, uniform butt edge profile and surface contour which denotes the common asphalt shingle. It has also been proposed that an asphalt shingle be constructed with a plurality of tongues, the upper ends of which are free and the lower ends of which are integral with the body of the shingle. A strip is placed behind the body of the shingle but in front of the tongues which have been fastened to the deck. Such structure provides only a single thickness, uniform butt edge profile and regular, insignificant discontinuities in the surface contour.

In short, the appearance of the prior art asphalt shingle indicated its lower cost. Manufacturers of asphalt shingles have long recognized these problems and have sought to improve the appearance of asphalt shingles by producing them in many colors and by varying the configuration of the tabs. Attempts have also been made to produce irregular surface contours which would give the shingle a bulkier appearance but these 'efforts have failed. The goal of producing an inexpensive asphalt shingle which had the physical appearance of the more expensive shingle has until now eluded those skilled in the art.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention is a composite asphaltimpregnated felt roofing shingle comprising a rectangular sheet having a headlap portion and a butt portion. The butt portion is divided into a series of spaced apart tabs. An elongated strip which is substantially the same length and preferably substantially the same thickness as the sheet (though it may be appreciably thicker or thinner) and substantially the same width as the height of the butt portion is secured to the butt portion in a position underlying at least one of the tabs. One embodiment of the present invention contemplates interweaving the strip with successive closely-spaced tabs. A second embodiment contemplates a sheet in which the tabs are spaced apart from each other at a distance approximating their width and the strip is secured to the sheet in a position underlying the tabs and filling the spaces therebetween.

A method for manufacturing the composite shingle of the second embodiment of the present invention comprises the steps of providing a rectangular sheet of a length at least equal to that of the finished shingle and a width equal to twice the headlap portion plus the height of the butt portion of the finished shingle. The rectangular sheet is then divided along a predetermined path to obtain two complementary segments. Each segment has a headlap portion and a butt portion which includes a series of tabs extending from the headlap portion and being spaced apart from each other at a distance approximating their widths. Finally, an elongated rectangular strip of substantial thickness is se' cured to the butt portion of each segment in a position underlying the tabs and filling the spaces therebetween. The underlying strip has about the same length as the segment and a width about equal to the height of the butt portion.

The composite shingle of the present invention, and particularly the shingle of the second embodiment, presents numerous significant advantages over conventional asphalt shingles. The unique structure of the shingle of the second embodiment enables the achievement of a roof covering which presents an irregular, bulky butt edge profile and surface contour which compares favorably to the substantial and imposing architectural appearance of more expensive roofing materials. Of equal importance, the novel underlying concept of the shingle of the second embodiment enables substantial savings in time and labor upon installation as well as a significant decrease in wastage of material. Unlike the conventional asphalt shingle, the shingle of the second embodiment is structured for application in an irregular manner. Course after course may be installed without the necessity of continual adjustment to obtain proper alignment of cutouts. Dormers and chimneys likewise no longer present a problem because the tedious and timeconsuming process of alignment and matching is unnecessary.

In contrast to the material wastage which necessarily resulted when conventional shingles were trimmed at the rake edge of a roof deck, fractional portions of the present shingle are readily usable in other courses without prior trimming. Finally, the unique method of making the shingle of the second embodiment enables the achievement of this novel structure at the lowest possible cost since no scrap whatever is produced.

The tabs of the shingles of both embodiments may be of varying widths, and the sheet and strip colors may be selected so as to be complementary or contrasting with sharp lines of demarcation between the various colors. Finally, by selection of granules of differing sizes and shapes for the butt portion and the strip respectively, controlled changes in surface color and texture may be obtained.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of one embodiment of the present shingle;

FIG. 1A is a plan view of the sheet portion of the shingle of FIG. 1;

FIG. 1B is a plan view of the strip portion of the shingle of FIG. 1;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a second embodiment of the present shingle;

FIG. 2A is a plan view of the headlap-butt portion of the shingle of FIG. 2 prior to assembly;

FIG. 2B is a plan view of the elongated rectangular strip portion of the shingle of FIG. 2 prior to assembly;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a section of roof laid with FIG. 1 shingles;

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of a section of roof laid with FIG. 2 shingles;

FIG. 5A is a perspective view of a sheet from which segments of the shingle of FIG. 2 are obtained; and

FIG. 5B is a perspective view of the sheet of FIG. 5A which has been divided into two complementary segments.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS A first embodiment of the present invention, as shown in FIGS. l-lB, is a composite roofing shingle comprising a rectangular sheet 11 of asphaltimpregnated and coated cellulosic felt or other suitable material. The rectangular sheet 11 includes a headlap portion 12 and a butt portion 13 which is divided into a series of spaced-apart tabs 14. In the FIG. 1 embodiment, the tabs 14 are quite closely spaced and the spaces extend continuously from the headlap portion 12 to the exposed longitudinal marginal edge 13a of the butt portion 13. The tabs 14 may be of equal or of varying widths and of rectangular, trapezoidal or other desired shape. It is preferred, however, that the central tab be of substantial width so that it will underlie the abutting side edges of adjoining shingles in the adjacent overlying course when the shingles are installed in the usual manner of offsetting successive courses a distance approximately one-half the length of a shingle as shown in FIG. 3. The weather surface of sheet 11 is coated with mineral granules 15 which are available in a large variety of colors and in different size gradings.

As is the usual practice in the manufacture of asphalt roofing in shingles, the height of the unexposed portion, when applied, is about two inches greater than the height of the exposed portion. This construction provides for proper drainage of moisture that may enter the cracks between abutting shingles 10. The moisture will then contact the headlap portion of the subjacent shingle and drain properly rather than seeping over the marginal edge of the headlap portion of the subjacent shingle.

An elongated strip 16, also of asphalt impregnated and coated felt or suitable weather-proofed material, is of substantial thickness, of substantially the same length as the sheet 11 and of substantially the same width as the height of the butt portion 13 of the sheet 11. Although in normal practice the sheet 11 and strip 16 will be substantially equal in thickness, it is contemplated that the sheet 11 may be made thicker than the strip 16 or that the strip 16 may be thicker than the sheet 11 to achieve a greater variance in surface and butt edge contour. As shown in FIG. 1, the strip 16 is interwoven with successive tabs 14 of the butt portion 13 and is secured thereto by an asphalt adhesive or other suitable means. A longitudinal marginal edge 16a coincides with the exposed longitudinal marginal edge 13a of the butt portion 13. The strip 16 also is coated on its weather surface with mineral granules l7, allowing selection of the sheet 11 and the strip 16 colors either to complement or to contrast.

The shingle of the first embodiment has a butt por- I tion thickness twice that of its headlap portion, the butt portion being of irregular surface contour because of the interweaving of the strip and the tabs. In the FIG.

1 embodiment there are small spaces 18 where the strip 16 abuts the headlap portion 11 between the successive tabs 14. Therefore, it is important to install each course of shingles so that the lower edge of the butt portions of an upper course slightly overlap the upper part of the butt portions of the subjacent course to prevent direct seepage of rain water or other moisture through the spaces 18. Furthermore, arranging a large tab of an underlying shingle directly below the interstice between abutting shingles of an overlying course assures that water which enters the interstice between the abutting shingles will drain over the surface of the underlying tab and not penetrate the underlying shingle where the strip abuts the headlap portion.

A composite shingle 20 of the second embodiment of the present invention, as illustrated in FIGS. 2-28, comprises a generally rectangular sheet 21 of asphaltimpregnated cellulosic felt or other suitable weatherproofed material which includes a headlap portion 22 and a butt portion 23. The butt portion 23 is divided into a series of spaced-apart tabs 24 which are integral with and extend from the headlap portion 22. The tabs 24 are spaced apart from each other at a distance approximating their width and the spaces which separate the tabs 24 extend continuously from the headlap portion 22 to the exposed longitudinal marginal edge 230 the butt portion 23. In general, the aggregate width of tabs 24 is approximately equal to the aggregate width of the spaces therebetween. The tabs 24 may be of equal or of different widths and of rectangular, trapezoidal or other desired shape and as in the case of FIG. I embodiment, the weather surface of sheet 21 is coated with colored mineral granules 25.

An elongated strip 26, also of suitable weatherproofed material, is usually the same type of material as the sheet 21, and is coated on its weather surface with colored mineral granules. The strip 26 has about the same length and thickness as the sheet 21 but is preferably of slightly greater width (say about one inch wider) than the height of the butt portion 23 of the sheet 21. As shown in FIG. 2, the strip 26 is secured to the sheet 21 in a position underlying the tabs 24 and filling the spaces therebetween. At least a portion of a lower longitudinal marginal edge 28a of the strip 26 coincides with the exposed longitudinal marginal edge 23a of the butt portion 23. Preferably, a lower marginal edge 27 of the headlap portion 22 slightly overlaps an upper marginal edge 28b of the strip 26 and is secured thereto by asphaltic adhesive or other suitable means to ensure a watertight seal between the sheet 21 and the strip 26. Each tab 24 is also secured to the strip 26 by adhesive or other suitable means.

This construction provides a shingle having a butt portion of irregular surface contour, for it has a double thickness where the strip 26 underlies a tab 24 and only a single thickness in the portions between tabs 24. Additionally, one transverse marginal edge 23b of the butt portion 23 is of single thickness as defined by a transverse marginal edge of the underlying strip 26, and the opposite transverse marginal edge 230 of the butt portion 23 is of double thickness as defined by the coincidence of a transverse edge of a tab 24 and the other transverse marginal edge of the strip 26.

As in the case of the FIG. 1 embodiment, sheet 21 and strip 26 colors may be complementary or contrasting as desired.

made from one larger piece which is equal in length to the sheets but wider by a dimension equal to the height of a headlap portion. When the larger piece is divided into two sheets the tabs of one sheet are formed from the spaces between the tabs of the other sheet. Thus, the amount of material necessary to obtain the advantages of the present shingle is not much greater than the amount required to make a prior art shingle.

Otherwise stated, the shingle of the second embodiment is manufactured from a rectangular asphaltimpregnated sheet 40 shown in FIG. 5A. The rectangular sheet 40 is of a length 41 at least equal to that of a finished shingle 20 and is of a width 42 equal to twice the height of the headlap portion 22 plus the height of the butt portion 23 of a finished shingle 20. The rectangular sheet 40 is divided along a predetermined unidimensional path 44 to obtain two complementary segments 40a, 40b as shown best in FIG. 5B. The aggregate surface area of the complementary segments 40a,

40b is substantially equal to the surface area of the rectangular sheet 40, there being no unusable scrap material left over. Each segment 40a, 40b corresponds structurally and functionally to the sheet 21, previously described and illustrated in FIG. 2A. One terminus 45 of the predetermined path 44 is a first locus on a first transverse marginal edge 46 of the rectangular sheet 40 which is displaced from a first longitudinal marginal edge 47 at a distance equal to the height of the headlap portion 22 of a finished shingle 20. The other terminus 48 is a second locus on a second transverse marginal edge 49 of the rectangular sheet 40, which is displaced from a second longitudinal marginal edge 51 at a distance equal to the height of the headlap portion 22 of a finished shingle 20.

An elongated rectangular strip corresponding structurally and functionally to strip 26 previously described and illustrated in FIG. 2B is secured to the butt portion of each segment 40a, 40b in a position underlying the tabs and filling the spaces therebetween, a longitudinal marginal edge of the strip coinciding with the exposed longitudinal marginal edge of the butt portion.

As seen best in FIGS. 3 and 4, the shingles of the present invention, when installed, are substantial and attractive in appearance. FIG. 3 illustrates a roof of I FIG. 1 shingles which, because of the interweaving of the strip with the tabs, normally has a butt edge thickness substantially twice that of roofs of prior art shingles. The interweaving also produces an irregular roofing surface contour.

Referring particularly to FIG. 4 which illustrates a roof covered with a plurality of successive offset courses of rectangular composite shingles according to the embodiment of FIG. 2, the single thickness transverse marginal edge of the butt portion of each shingle of a given course abuts the double thickness transverse marginal edge of the adjacent shingle of that course. Furthermore, as clearly illustrated in FIG. 4, the shingles of a course 52 are offset from the shingles of an immediately subjacent course 53 by a first longitudinal distance and the shingles of course 53 are, in turn, offset from the shingles of an immediately subjacent course 54 by a second longitudinal distance, the first and second longitudinal distances being unequal to each other. In fact, the respective courses of shingles of the FIG. 2 embodiment, unlike conventional shingles, may be offset from each other at any distance less than the length of a shingle and such distance may be varied at random without adversely affecting the quality and appearance of the ultimate roof covering. Variations of surface contour on a roof of the present shingles are particularly evident in FIG. 4 wherein the exposed lower edges of the butt portion of successive courses are of a thickness equal to the single (at 31), double (at 32) and triple (at 33) thickness of the granule-covered sheet material of which the shingle is made, each variation in thickness being evident in substantial areas of the roof.

The shingles of the present invention are particularly well suited for use with the self-sealing adhesives which are well known in the art. Groups of adhesive spots may be employed on the headlap portion of the presen shingle immediately adjacent the butt portion to adhere the butt portions of the shingles of the adjacent overlying course thereto. This is possible because the courses of shingles overlie each other in flush contact even though their exposed surfaces are irregular.

I claim:

1. A composite asphalt-impregnated felt roofing shingle comprising a rectangular sheet having a headlap portion and a butt portion, the butt portion comprising a series of tabs separated by spaces extending continuously from the headlap portion to the exposed edge of the butt portion; and an elongated rectangular strip of substantial thickness having substantially the same length as the sheet and a width substantially equal to the height of the butt portion, the strip being interwoven with successive tabs, a longitudinal marginal edge of the strip coinciding with the exposed longitudinal marginal edge of the butt portion.

2. A composite roofing shingle according to claim 1 wherein the strip and the sheet are substantially equal in thickness.

3. A composite roofing shingle according to claim 1 wherein the tabs are of varying widths.

4. A composite roofing shingle according to claim 1 wherein the sheet and the strip are coated with mineral granules.

5. A composite roofing shingle according to claim 4 wherein the granules of the sheet differ in color from the granules of the strip.

6. A composite roofing shingle according to claim 4 wherein the granules of the sheet differ in size from the granules of the strip.

7. A roof covering comprising a plurality of successive courses of asphalt impregnated felt roofing shingles, the shingles of each course being laid side-by-side, each course being offset from the adjacent courses by approximately one-half the length of a shingle, and each shingle comprising a rectangular sheet having a headlap portion and a butt portion, the butt portion comprising a series of tabs separated by spaces extending continuously from the headlap portion to exposed edge of the butt portion; and an elongated rectangular strip having substantially the same length and approximately the same thickness as the sheet and a width substantially equal to the height of the butt portion, the strip being interwoven with successive tabs, a longitudinal marginal edge of the strip coinciding with the exposed longitudinal marginal edge of the butt portion; the exposed edges of the butt portions of successive courses having a thickness substantially twice that of the headlap portions.

8. A roof covering according to claim 7 wherein a tab of each shingle in a given course underlies the interstices between abutting shingles of the adjacent overlying course, the tab being of sufficient width to prevent penetration through to the underlying shingles of moisture which may seep through the interstices.

9. A composite asphalt-impregnated felt roofing shingle comprising a sheet of substantial thickness having a rectangular headlap portion and a butt portion which includes a series of tabs integral with and extending from the headlap portion, the tabs being spaced apart from each other at varying substantial distances, at least some of the tabs and some of the spaces between the tabs differing from each other in width and the aggregate width of the tabs being approximately equal to the aggregate width of the spaces which separate the tabs, and both the tabs and the spaces which separate the tabs extending continuously from the headlap portion to the exposed longitudinal marginal edge of the butt portion; and an elongated rectangular strip of substantial thickness having about the same length as the sheet and a width about equal to the height of the butt portion, the strip being secured to the sheet in a posi' tion underlying at least a lower marginal edge of the headlap portion and a substantial portion of the tabs and the spaces therebetween; a plurality of the shinglesbeing capable of constituting a roof covering wherein courses of shingles are laid side-by-side and the shingles of immediately adjacent courses are capable of being variably offset from each other at random distances less then the length of an individual shingle.

10. A composite roofing shingle according to claim 9 wherein one transverse marginal edge of the butt portion is of single thickness as defined by a transverse marginal edge of the underlying strip and the opposite transverse marginal edge of the butt portion is of double thickness as defined by the coincidence of a transverse edge of a tab and the other transverse marginal edge of the strip.

11. A composite roofing shingle according to claim 9 wherein a marginal edge of the strip underlies a marginal edge of the headlap portion, the underlying portion of the strip being secured in a watertight manner to the headlap portion.

12. A composite roofing shingle according to claim 9 wherein the strip and the sheet are substantially equal in thickness.

13. A composite roofing shingle according to claim 9 wherein the tabs are of varying widths.

14. A composite roofing shingle according to claim 9 wherein the sheet and the strip are coated with min-' eral granules.

15. A composite roofing shingle according to claim 14 wherein the granules of the sheet differ in color from the granules of the strip.

16. A composite roofing shingle according to claim 10 wherein the granules of the sheet differ in size from the granules of the strip.

17. A roof covering comprising a plurality of successive courses of asphalt-impregnated felt roofing shingles of substantial thickness, the shingles of each course being laid side-by-side and capable of being variably offset from the shingles of immediately adjacent courses at random distances less than the length of an individual shingle; each shingle having a rectangular headlap portion and a butt portion which includes a series of tabs integral with and extending from the headlap portion, the tabs of each shingle being spaced apart from each other at varying substantial distances, at least some of the tabs and some of the spaces between the tabs differing from each other in width and the aggregate width of the tabs being approximately equal to the aggregate width of the spaces which separate the tabs, and both the tabs and the spaces which separate the tabs extending continuously from the headlap portion to the exposed longitudinal marginal edge of the butt portion; and an elongated rectangular strip of substantial thickness having about the same length as the sheet and a width about equal to the height of the butt portion, the strip being secured to the sheet in a position underlying at least a lower marginal edge of the headlap portion and a substantial portion of the tabs and the spaces therebetween; the exposed edge of the butt portion of successive courses of shingles being of single thickness in some random substantial areas of the roof, of double thickness in other random substantial areas of the roof and of triple thickness in still other random substantial areas of the roof.

18. A roof covering according to claim 17 wherein the shingles of a given course are offset from the shingles of an immediately subjacent course by a first longitudinal distance and the shingles of another given course are offset from the shingles of an immediately subjacent course by a second longitudinal distance, the first and second longitudinal distances being unequal to each other and less than the length of a shingle.

19. A roof covering according to claim 17 wherein the underlying strip portions of the shingles of a first course are in flush contact with and adhesively bonded to the headlap portions of the shingles of an immediately subjacent second course.

20. Paired, individual appliable, composite asphaltimpregnated felt roofing shingles, each shingle comprising a sheet of substantial thickness having a rectangular headlap portion and a butt portion which includes a series of spaced-apart tabs integral with and extending from the headlap portion, each tab and each space between the tabs of each shingle of the pair being quadrilateral and extending continuously from the headlap portion to the exposed longitudinal marginal edge of the butt portion, at least some of the tabs and some of the spaces being dissimilar from each other in width, and the tabs of the first shingle of each pair conforming in size and shape to the spaces between the tabs of the second shingle of the pair and the tabs of the second shingle conforming in size and shape to the spaces between the tabs of the first shingle; and an elongated rectangular strip of substantial thickness having about the same length as the sheet and a width about equal to the height of the butt portion, the strip being secured to the sheet in a position underlying at least a lower marginal edge of the headlap portion and a substantial portion of the tabs and the spaces therebetween; a plurality of the shingles being capable of constituting a roof covering wherein courses of shingles are laid sideby-side and the shingles of immediately adjacent courses are capable of being variably offset from each other at random distances less than the length of an individual shingle and each shingle of each pair capable of being randomly arranged with respect to each other and with respect to the shingles of each other pair of shingles applied to the roof.

21. Paired individually applicable composite roofing shingles according to claim 20 wherein at least one transverse marginal edge of at least one tab is skewed with respect to a transverse marginal edge of the rectangular sheet.

22. A roof covering comprising a plurality of successive courses of paired, individually appliable, rectangular asphaltimpregnated felt roofing shingles of substantial thickness, the shingles of each course being laid side-by-side and capable of being variably offset from the shingles of immediately adjacent courses at random distances less than the length of an individual shingle and each shingle of each pair capable of being randomly arranged with respect to each other and with respect to the shingles of each other pair of shingles applied to the roof; each shingle having a rectangular headlap portion and a butt portion which includes a series of spaced-apart tabs integral with and extending from the headlap portion, each tab and each space between the tabs of each shingle of each pair being quadrilateral and extending continuously from the headlap portion to the exposed longitudinal marginal edge of the butt portion, at least some of the tabs and some of the spaces being dissimilar from each other in width, and the tabs of each shingle of each pair conforming in size and shape to the spaces between the tabs of the other shingle of each pair; and an elongated rectangular strip of substantial thickness having about the same length as the sheet and a width about equal to the height of the butt portion, the strip being secured to the sheet in a position underlying at least a lower marginal edge of the headlap portion and a substantial portion of the tabs and the spaces therebetween; the exposed edge of the butt portion of successive courses of shingles being of single thickness in some random substantial areas of the roof, of double thickness in other random substantial areas of the roof and of triple thickness in still other random substantial areas of the roof.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification52/314, 52/555, 52/557, 52/419
International ClassificationE04D1/00, E04D1/26
Cooperative ClassificationE04D1/26, E04D2001/005
European ClassificationE04D1/26
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Sep 5, 1995ASAssignment
Owner name: SHAWMUT CAPITAL CORPORATION, CONNECTICUT
Free format text: SALE/TRANSFER OF SECURITY INTEREST TO NOW SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:BARCLAYS BUSINESS CREDIT, INC.;REEL/FRAME:007629/0231
Effective date: 19950130
Sep 5, 1995AS99Other assignments
Free format text: SHAWMUT CAPITAL CORPORATION 200 GLASTONBURY BOULEVARD GLASTONBURY, CONNECTICUT 0 * BARCLAYS BUSINESS CREDIT, INC. : 19950130 OTHER CASES: NONE; SALE/TRANSFER OF SECURITY INTEREST TO NOW SECURED PARTY
Apr 17, 1995AS06Security interest
Owner name: BARCLAYS BUSINESS CREDIT, INC. 200 GLASTONBURY BOU
Owner name: BIRD INCORPORATED
Effective date: 19941130
Apr 17, 1995ASAssignment
Owner name: BARCLAYS BUSINESS CREDIT, INC., CONNECTICUT
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:BIRD INCORPORATED;REEL/FRAME:007434/0212
Effective date: 19941130
Aug 13, 1992ASAssignment
Owner name: GAF BUILDING MATERIALS CORPORATION
Owner name: GAF CHEMICALS CORPORATION
Free format text: RELEASED BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:CHASE MANHATTAN BANK, THE (NATIONAL ASSOCIATION);REEL/FRAME:006243/0208
Effective date: 19920804
Owner name: SUTTON LABORATORIES, INC.
Dec 3, 1990ASAssignment
Owner name: CHASE MANHATTAN BANK, THE, (NATIONAL ASSOCIATION)
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:GAF BUILDING MATERIALS CORPORATION, A CORP. OF DE;REEL/FRAME:005648/0038
Effective date: 19900917
Oct 30, 1989ASAssignment
Owner name: GAF BUILDING MATERIALS CORPORATION, A CORP. OF DE,
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Jun 14, 1989ASAssignment
Owner name: CHASE MANHATTAN BANK (NATIONAL ASSOC.) THE
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Effective date: 19890329
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