Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3921516 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 25, 1975
Filing dateApr 4, 1974
Priority dateApr 4, 1974
Publication numberUS 3921516 A, US 3921516A, US-A-3921516, US3921516 A, US3921516A
InventorsFroman Richard M, Toft Roger D
Original AssigneeNcr Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Multiple station label printing machine
US 3921516 A
Abstract
Label printing mechanism for use with and controlled by a ticket issuing system requiring labels with various data, such as store name, commodity name and grade, price per pound, selling price, data code, and operator code. Type printing elements and coded data bars are disposed on the periphery of a single printing cylinder or drum, there being an auxiliary cylinder in the nature of typewheels, journaled on an axis spaced from the axis of the drum and which, together with a pressure roller and print hammers, comprise printing stations for the labels. The typewheels are set or indexed by means of a key insertable in a slot in the printing cylinder, the key being programmed at intervals therealong corresponding to the typewheel locations. The single cylinder or drum is of modular construction to permit flexibility in adapting to a variety of printing applications.
Images(5)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Toit et al.

[ Nov. 25, 1975 1 MULTIPLE STATION LABEL PRINTING MACHINE [75] Inventors: Roger D. Toft; Richard M. Froman,

both of Dayton, Ohio [52] US. Cl. ..101/91; 101/66; 101/99;

101/110; l01/93.12 [51] Int. Cl. 1341.] 3/46 [58] Field of Search 101/91, 92, 68, 69, 76,

OTHER PUBLICATIONS A.P.C. Application of Mercier, Ser. No. 314407, published May 25, 1943.

Primary Examiner-Edgar S. Burr Assistant E.xaminer-Edward M. Coven Attorney, Agent, or FirmJ. T. Cavender; Wilbert Hawk, Jr.; George J. Muckenthaler [57] ABSTRACT Label printing mechanism for use with and controlled by a ticket issuing system requiring labels with various data, such as store name, commodity name and grade, price per pound, selling price, data code, and operator code. Type printing elements and coded data bars are disposed on the periphery of a single printing cylinder or drum, there being an auxiliary cylinder in the na- 5 References Cited ture of typewheels, journaled on an axis spaced from UNITED STATES PATENTS the axis of the drum and which, together with a pressure roller and rint hammers, comprise printing stations for the labels. The typewheels are set or indexed l605188 H926 Hubbard I 101mg by means of a key insertable in a slot in the printing 2:l79:269 11/1939 Ogden.............................:101/91 x cylinder the key being Programmed at intervals there- 2,s22,751 2/1958 Haseloff 101 91 x along Corresponding to the typewheel locations- The 2,933,038 4/1960 Thut et al. 101/91 Single cylinder or drum is of modular construction to 3,223,033 12/1965 Sundblad lOl/l 10 X permit flexibility in adapting to a variety of printing 3,420,163 l/l969 'Ritzerfe1d.... 101/91 X applications, 3,468,479 9/1969 Sauter 101/110 x 3,731,622 5/1973 Baranoff 101 110 x 2 Claims, 11 Drawmg Flgures it" b I30 (v I72 (7v L; 242 I C" I ---"-1 j l l a Ca 82 s 13! sheet 1 of5 3,921,516

mum v Nov. 25, 1975 owc mad

US. Patent US. Patent Nov. 25, 1975 Sheet20f5 3,921,516

FIG. 2

US. Patent Nov. 25, 1975 Sheet30f5 3,921,516

US. Patent NOv. 25, 1975 Sheet 4 Of5 3,921,516

FIG. 5 I74 66 74 59 FIG. 7

lMPERIAL FOODTOWN 2 -----m l2l5 E STROOP RD DAYTON, OHIO WEIGHT VALUE LBS NET flu '4 PER LB FRESH GROUND CHUCK 2 JAN 25 US CHO E |6| U.S. Patent Nov. 25, 1975 Sheet5of5 3,921,516

FIG. 9

I56 I55 I54 I53 I52 |5| 2|O Ill MULTIPLE STATION LABEL PRINTING MACHINE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION In the field of label or ticket printing machines, there is usually provided a supply reel or spool on which is wound a continuous strip of tape or sheet material and which tape is caused to be unwound from the reel and driven in controlled manner past a printing station for imprinting on the tape the desired information relating to the purpose for which the label or ticket is to be used. Such information may be in the nature of data for athletic events with place, date, seat and row numbers or letters, admission price, etc., it may be in the nature of postal information with place, date, charges, etc., or it may be in the nature of data on commodity labels with store name, commodity name and grade, price per pound, selling price, etc. Depending upon the structure of the machine, either before or after the printing of such information, the tape is severed or cut at precise lengths and the labels or tickets are ejected from the machine ready for use. Of course, the latter severing operation normally is not used in the case of tickets for athletic events, theaters, or the like wherein the tape is perforated or weakened at precise points for easy tearoff by the distributor of the tickets.

Over a number of years, label or ticket printing machines have been improved by inventors to obtain new results through the use of structure which includes patentable subject matter. The prior art covering certain structure in this area of such printing machines is represented by Braun U.S. Pat. No. Re. 24, 547 which discloses a tag marking machine devised to print and to perforate information on small tags, such machine having a counter mechanism to control from one keyboard the setting of the printing and perforating operation, a positive tag feeding mechanism effective to feed a single tag or a web or strip of material, a tag cut-off mechanism controlled by the counter mechanism, and a printing mechanism which simultaneously prints and perforates the same information upon successively fed tags. Davis et al. U.S. Pat. No. 1,685,352 discloses a machine for providing classification slips with a large cylinder carrying a small drum on the periphery thereof to produce different groups of type on the slips, and a plurality of numbering wheels rotatably mounted in the cylinder. Breitling et al. U.S. Pat. No. 2,210,021 discloses printing means with a drum having several sets of type wheels arranged circumferentially around ring gears for printing of date, commodity, clerk, amount, transaction, and special symbol. Jacobson U.S. Pat. No. 2.694.361 shows a rotary selective label printing machine with a printing roller unit having a gang of rollers circumferentially disposed to print various types of information. A label printing device with a wheel having grooves in the periphery thereof for reception of stamping blocks is disclosed in Draper U.S. Pat. No. 2,695.557. A ticket printer in connection with a scale and means for controlling feeding of a strip of tickets for precise lengths thereof is shown in Allen U.S. Pat. No. 2,824,736. Thut et al. U.S. Pat. No. 2,933,038 discloses code recording apparatus with a cylindrical member having metal block recording elements settable to different positions along the circumference of the cylinder. Pearson U.S. Pat. No. 3,002,448 discloses a ticket issuing machine with a printing drum having a printing plate fixed to its periphery and a row of setta- 2 ble disks mounted on the drium-and extending radially in a manner so that type characters on the disks are at the periphery of the drum. Lundquist et al. U.S. Pat. No. 3,062,133 shows a postal meter wherein a rotary printing drum carries an indicia die and an auxiliary printing drum carries a circle die, rate die, and a removable die plate. A variable length label printer having type face on the printing roller and a cut-off knife mounted on a holder within the roller is shown in Sohn U.S. Pat. No. 3,099,212. Bell U.S. Pat. No. 3,119,326 discloses a scale and printer unit with such printer unit providing for intermittent advancing, printing, and cutting of successive labels from a strip. Preprinted labels may include store name and like headings with further printing of net weight, price per pound, total price, date, store code, and commodity name and grade, and the printing station has the type set up in a horizontal plane. May et al. U.S. Pat. No. 3,356,021 discloses a selective printer and system for processing tickets having magnetic information thereon and wherein the ticket handling mechanism is connected to a computer. A main drive roll receives a ticket from selector rolls, depending upon orientation of each ticket, and sends it to a printing station comprising two groups of print wheels and a reversible incrementing clutch drive, with the print wheels having each numeral in both normal and reversed position. A friction drive member, keyed to a common shaft, drives each wheel until a magnetically driven ratchet stops the wheel, and actuation of several print start magnets, energized from the computer through emitter and sensor means, release impact plates to strike the characters. A selective rotary epicyclic label printer which includes a rotary unit on which are mounted one or more printing devices for printing on a different line of the label is disclosed in Kruger U.S. Pat. No. 3,363,550, and wherein an epicyclic gear train controls the printing device to roll along a path substantially tangential to the label and to print with a rolling action. Cyclic feeding of the labels is timed with the printing action and there is provision for varying the radial position of the bed on which the labels are supported. Huber U.S. Pat. No. 3,453,952 discloses a selective rotary printing machine wherein a cylinder has bores in one of its end surfaces engageable with a pin attached to a connecting member secured to the shaft. The cylinder carries a plurality of circumferentially spaced adjustable type mechanisms and a type field with type characters on the periphery thereof. The position of the bores in the end surface correspond with the respective positions of the type mechanisms. Smith U.S. Pat. No. 3,662,681 shows and describes a ticket printing and issuing machine with roller inker means wherein a plurality of typewheel modules have a set of printing type elements along one-half of its periphery and a set of indicator type elements along the other half of its periphery. And, Levesque U.S. Pat. No. 3,768,402 et al. discloses a ticket printer having means for controllably advancing a web of material across a printing station which comprises a primary drum with a plurality of printing indicia circumferentially spaced on at least a portion of the periphery and a second drum mounted on an axis radially outward of the primary drum and having a plurality of printing indicia circumferentially spaced around at least a portion thereof. Levesque also discloses indexing means to provide for rotating the secondary drum relative to the primary drum to position selected indicia on the secondary drum adjacent selected indicia on the periphery of the primary drum. Primary indexing means rotates the printing drum to place any selected indicia on the drum into the printing position, and print hammer means is provided for urging the web of material into momentary printing contact against selected indicia on either drum.

Prior art in indexing or setting printing apparatus is disclosed in Ohmer U.S. Pat. No. 768,619 wherein a conductors key is inserted in a slot in the printing member so as to have characters on the key impressed on a paper strip. Putnam U.S. Pat. No. 1,208,832 shows a printing machine having a rotary printing member and an implement in the form of an engaging tool for insertion into notches in the type disk for adjusting thereof. Mitchell et al. US. Pat. No. 1,659,213 discloses a tapered key for use with a combination printing and registering apparatus wherein the key is mounted in a tapered keyway in the print element spindle for locking the numeral wheels as well as the printing die. And, Reiner US. Pat. No. 3,157,116 shows drum series type wheel setting means wherein each of the printing and setting wheels is provided with an inwardly projecting key formed in its bearing bore and engaging with corresponding keyways in the bearing bushing to provide a rigid connection between the setting wheels and the printing type wheels.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to printing mechanism and more particularly to label printing mechanism designed for use with and controlled by a ticket issuing system requiring labels containing certain and various data, such as store name, commodity name and grade, price per pound, selling price, data code, and operator code. A plurality of various type printing elements including alpha and numeric characters and bar codes are disposed on the periphery of the printing cylinder or drum and which, together with associated printing apparatus, comprise the specific and functional printing stations. The printing stations are readily adaptable for different length and width tickets or labels, and which labels are derived initially from a supply roll of tape or like continuous material, the tape being driven through a cut-off station, and the labels being guided in a path past the print drum for the printing operation. The tape is first con'trollably driven through the cut-off station wherein a photocell detects or senses holes or notches in the tape to effect a shear knife operation at the precise point in travel of the tape. A single label drive roll then engages with the label and propels it into proper registration at the print station in readiness for impact by the print hammer.

The print drum mechanism includes an auxiliary printing station in the form of type wheels which are supported on a separate axis radially disposed from the axis of the drum and which type wheels are also adjust-.

able or settable by means of a set-up key which is inserted in a slot in the drum and engageable with the type wheels. The auxiliary station wheels carry type characters on the periphery thereof, whereas the main print drum has type characters and bar characters secured thereto in addition to removable insert keys on the periphery. The set-up key has a series of notches or indentations therealong at intervals corresponding to the type wheel locations of the print drum. A springloaded detent is located in the print drum end plate permitting location determination of the key with respect to the several wheels, and as the key is withdrawn from the drum, the key is rotatable at each specific interval to position a respective type wheel. A selection code is provided by a dial on the end plate and a color code may be placed on the key to correspond to the type wheel being set.

The print hammers are magnetically held and timing pulses are received from an electromagnet adjacent the teeth on the main drum to activate selected hammers. A cam is used to restore the hammers to their nonprinting position. After the printing operation, a label ejector is activated to remove the printed label from the print station and to deposit such label in a container.

In view of the above discussion, the principal object of the present invention is to provide an improved label printing mechanism.

An additional object of the present invention is to provide a printing cylinder or drum having type ele ments on the periphery thereof and including an auxiliary set of type wheels radially disposed from the axis of the print drum.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a plurality of type elements wherein certain of the elements are adjustable or settable in relation to other elements. t,

A further object of the present invention is to provide indexing or setting means having identifying means corresponding to the type elements being indexed or set.

Additional advantages and features of the present invention will become apparent and fully understood from a reading of the following description taken together with the annexed drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a side elevational view of a label printer, generally diagrammatic in nature, and including the structure of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of the apparatus shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged view of certain structure shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a sectional view of the printing apparatus taken along the plane 44 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 5 is a view taken along the plane 5-5 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 6, on the sheet with FIG. 1, is a view of a chart showing the various settings for typewheels from the set-up or index key;

FIG. 7 is a face view of the arrangement of the printed label;

FIG. 8 is a side elevational view of the serrated plate which is positioned adjacent the typewheels;

FIG. 9 is a side view of the typewheel setting key;

FIG. 10 is a sectional view taken along the plane l010 of FIG. 9; and

FIG. 11 is an exploded view of the typewheel assembly.

Referring now to FIGS. 1 and 2, the label printing machine includes a reel 12 journaled on a shaft 13 and carrying a supply of label material in the form of tape 14 or the like, which material is caused to be unwound from the reel 12 in controlled manner by means of a supply roll drive motor 16. The tape 14 is driven in a path over a first fixed idler l8 journaled on a pin 19, around a movable idler 20, and over a second fixed idler 22, carried on a pin 23, the movable idler 20 being journaled on a pin 24 carried on a tension arm 26 which is pivotally connected to a pin 28 on a frame member 30 adjacent the reel 12, the-pin 24 being movable in an arcuate slot 31 in frame rn emb er 30-for relative movement of the arm 26. The--tension arm 26 is held in biased manner by means of a torsion spring 32 on the pin 28 to maintain proper tension on the tape 14, which tape is driven intermittently by the motor 16 through a drive roll 34 connected by a drive belt 36 to the motor. Cooperating with the drive roll 34 is a tape drive roll for moving the tape 14 in a precise path toward the printing station. The tape 14 is directed over the second fixed idler 22 along such path between guide plates 38 and 40, forming a chute for the tape and positioned to retain such tape 14 in a horizontal plane in the area of travel prior to the printing station. The tape reel 12 may be a standard 8 inch or larger diameter reel, and the tape 14 may be of stock material up to 3 inches in width depending upon the amount of printed material desired thereon.

A shear knife assembly and the controls therefor are supported in an arrangement above and to the rearward side of the pair of guide plates 38 and 40, the shear knife assembly comprising a knife 42, a knife drive bar 44, a knife restore spring 46, a shear bar 48, and a drive bar restore spring 50. A solenoid 52 is connected to the drive bar 44 by means of an arm 54 and a pin 56, the solenoid 52 being actuated by connection to a light source in the form of a photocell 58 which detects apertures or slots (not shown) in the tape 14 to actuate the knife 42 and thereby shear the tape at predetermined locations to provide for tape portions of correct length as labels 59. The shear knife 42, the shear bar 48, and the photocell 58 are adjustable to several positions so as to provide for different lengths of labels 59, if so desired.

A second pair of guide plates 60 and 62, in the form of a chute for the labels 59, are disposed just beyond the shear knife to receive the labels 59 in successive manner and to direct such labels in singular fashion past the printing station. A single label drive roll 66 (see FIGS. 3 and 4), positioned beyond the shear knife 42, is used to advance each label 59 in such singular and successive fashion, the drive roll 66 being connected through a clutch 68 (see FIG. 2) with a main drive motor 70, the clutch being operated and rotated at a lower speed of 120 rpm by means of reduction members in the drive line from the standard 1725 rpm to such 120 rpm.

Printing a portion of the matter on the labels 59 is accomplished by print hammers 80 which are actuated from a timing pulse electromagnet 82 which is positioned adjacent a toothed wheel or disk 83 (FIG. 5) carried on the print drum or cylinder shaft and rotating therewith. A holding magnet 84 maintains the print hammers 80 in a cocked position until the hammers are fired by conventional means such as a magnetic actuating assembly, there being a hammer restore cam line 86 connected to the main motor 70 through a hammer restore cam drive 87, (FIG. 2) and cam line follower springs 88 having preset forces, such forces being exerted by the hammers 80 on release thereof, and being determined and established through the use of cam controlled hammer lever arms 90, FIG. 1.

A label ejector in the form of a roller 100 is connected to the main drive motor 70 through a drive member 101, the ejector roller 100 being spring loaded and actuated by a solenoid 102 through an arm 104 to move the ejector roller 100 against the label 59 and thereby cause the label to be driven from the chute area, formed by guide plates 60, 62, after completion of printing.

Printing of the labels 59 is accomplished by means of a print drum station 110 and a print cylinder station 112 (see specifically FIGS. 3,. 4, and 5). the axis of the cylinder station 112 being parallel to and spaced from that of the drum station 110.. The drum station 110 is driven from the main drive motor through a shaft 113 and is approximately four inches in diameter and carries on the periphery thereof numeric data 115, bar code data 116, and locating slots for commodity inserts 117, 118, 119, the numeric data 115 being in the form of type characters engraved on the surface of the drum and the bar code data 116 also being engraved thereon. The numeric data or type characters occupy approximately one-fourth of the periphery of the drum 110, the characters 115 being spaced in twelve columns and reading from 09 in rows so as to be struck by the hammers 80 in predetermined sequence to print the net weight, the price per pound, and the total price or value of a commodity. The bar code data 116 occupies approximately one-fourth of the periphery of the drum 110 and is spaced in columns and rows so as to print the desired code upon impact by the hammers 80 at the precise times. The commodity inserts 117, 118, 119 are located in slots on the periphery of the drum 110 and are removable to permit different formats to be printed. One of the inserts 117 contains the store name and address, another insert 118 con tains the words lbs net weight, value, and price per lb, and a third insert 119 contains the commodity and/or ingredients thereof. As the print drum is rotated, additional printing on the label 59 is accomplished by rolling pressure of the label drive roller 66 on the several inserts 117, 118, 119 after inking of the inserts by a spring-loaded inking roll 114, (FIG. 4) carried on a shaft 99 and engageable with the various data characters. Each of the inserts 117, 118, 119 includes, at the ends thereof, serrations 89 (FIG. 3) for advancing the labels 59 upon engagement therewith and as the drum 110 is rotated counterclockwise into position for printing on the labels by the inserts 117, 118 and 119.

The print cylinder station 112 comprises a plurality of typewheels, such as wheel 111, FIG. 4, having a common axis spaced from and parallel with the axis of the print drum 110, the typewheel 111 being positioned in relation to thelperiphery of the printdrum 110 so as to place the periphery of the typewheel characters in an extended manner slightly beyond the periphery of the drum 110. The print drum 110 has a portion of the periphery removed therefrom, in the form of a window 108, to permit placement of the typewheels in such manner, the printing on the label 59 being performed by the rolling pressure of the label drive roller 66 over the typewheel characters exposed in the window 108. Such typewheel characters include symbols for an operator code, grade of commodity, and the date, which information changes sufficiently often to necessitate setting and resetting of the typewheels.

As seen in FIGS. 5, 9, and 10, a special key 120 with a handle 121 is positionable into hollow cylinder or bushing portions 122 (FIG. 4) on which the typewheel 111 and adjacent wheels are supported in integral manner, the wheels being independently rotatable of each other so as to enable changing of the various factors or symbols. The bushing portions 122 include a slot 124 on the interior diameter along its length for mating with a rib 126 on the key 120, the: rib 126 and slot 124 cooperating to rotate the typewheels when inserted into the bushing portions 122. Additionally, the key 120 contains indentations 128 spaced along its lower side and substantially around the periphery thereof, such indentations corresponding to typewheel locations axially along the print cylinder 172, so that at each wheel location, and as the insert key 120 is being withdrawn from the bushing portions 122, rotation of the key 120 engages a particular typewheel, such as wheel 111, for rotational setting thereof to the desired position. A series of detents 130, FIG. 4, carried on a pivot 132 and biased by springs 133 connected to a pin 134, are engageable in the slots of each typewheel and between the teeth thereof to retain the typewheels in the desired aligned position. Further, the print drum 110 includes an aperture 131 for storage of the insert key 120 after setting of the typewheels. Such aperture 131 is located adjacent the typewheel assembly whereupon storage of the key 120 positions the rib 126 in the groove between adjacent teeth of each typewheel to maintain all wheels in aligned manner and in the position as keyed" by the operator.

As seen in FIG. 6, on the sheet with FIG. 1, a chart 140 shows the format of the various symbols used on the typewheels, such as the wheel 111, for the operator code, as designated by one of the letters shown in row 142 of the chart 140, grade of the commodity, as in row 144, and the date, as shown in rows 146, 148, and 150, and as set forth and corresponding to positions of the typewheels as set by the special key 120. Since there are twelve teeth on each typewheel, such as previously mentioned wheel 111 (FIG. and a plurality of adjacent wheels 151, 152, 153, 154, 155, and 156, each wheel can be set to any one of the twelve positions indicated to be accessible in the window 108 on the side of the print clrum 110 to provide the desired printing. It should be here noted that the label 59 is carried through and emerges from the printing station with the printing on the bottom side in a manner so that the name of the store is printed last, as seen in the face view ofthe label 59, FIG. 7. For example, the typewheel 111 on the right side in FIG. 5 carries number characters for a code, such as number of pieces or the like, as illustrated at the bottom of the chart 140. Suffice it to say that the numbers 112 could indicate other codes as required or in the manner desired.

The next typewheel, shown as 151 in FIGS. 5 and 11, and being of wider dimension, carries the month, and the next two wheels, 152 and 153, carry the numbers for the days of the month. The next typewheel 154 has the letters U S, typewheel 155 carries the grade of the commodity as shown in row 144 of chart 140, and typewheel 156 carries the twelve letters signifying an operator code as in row 142 of chart 140, and selectable by each specific operator.

l nking of the type characters on the typewheels 111 and 151156, of the data on the commodity inserts 117,118, and 119, and of the code bars 116 is enabled by means of the inking roller 114 carried on the shaft 99, the roller 114 having an elongated journal portion for lost-motion movement as the roller is rotated upon engagement with the periphery of the print drum 110 and the print cylinder 112. This construction, of course, enables limited movement of the roller 114 so as to apply an even cover of ink on the several characters and symbols which elements may vary in height around the periphery of the drum 110.

In FIG. 7 is indicated on the label 59, in line 8 as reference 161 thereof, the printing 2 JAN 25 US CHO E meaning the number of pieces or like data 2, the latest date JAN 25 for marketing of the item, US Choice as the grade, and the operator's code E. The first three lines, indicating store name and address thereof and designated 162, although printed lastly of the several data on the label 59, are printed from the commodity insert 117 as the print drum is rotated past the label drive roll 66, and the letters in the next two lines, designated as 164, are printed from the commodity insert 118 as the print drum 110 is rotated past the drive roll 66. Printing of the weight, price, and value in numerals and designated 166 is performed by impact of the hammers 80 against the type characters on the periphery of the print drum 110, as is printing of the bar code upon impact of the hammers 80 against the bar characters 116. Printing of the commodity and/or ingredients as Fresh Ground Chuck and designated 168 is accomplished by passage of the commodity insert 119 under the drive roll 66.

Referring back to FIGS. 3, 4, and 5, the print drum 110 includes camming surfaces 170 and 172. such camming surfaces being positioned on end plates 180, 182 of the drum 110 to be engageable by a shaft 174 which carries the pressure roller 66, all for the purpose of preventing contact of the roller 66 with the code bars 116 and with the type characters 115 on the periphery of the drum. The camming surfaces 170, which are adjacent the bars 116 (FIG. 4), and the camming surfaces 172, which are adjacent the type characters 115, and upon rotation of the print drum 110, engage the shaft 174 and raise such shaft and roller 66 so as not to press against the freshly-inked bars 116 or characters 115, as printing from these elements is accomplished by means of the print hammers 80. Again, the drive roll 66 in cludes provision for limited movement, in an up and down direction, on the shaft 174 by means of a lostmotion connection therebetween to accommodate the different heights of the several type elements.

In the assembly of the print drum 110 along with that of the print cylinder 112 and the various typewheels 111, 151-156, the drum 110 is comprised of the two members and 182 forming the end plates and each having a disk-shaped portion for the periphery of the drum and for containing the various type characters 115, the code bars 116, and the removable inserts 117, 118 and 119. The two halves, portion 183 and portion 185 are joined together and secured by means of long screws 188 after assembly of the typewheel line.

Referring now to FIG. 11, which shows the line of typewheels, the end portions 180 and 182 have hubs 184 and 186, respectively, thereon, the hub 184 including a recess 188 and a bore 189 for a spring-loaded de tent 191 (FIG. 5) engageable with the various notches 128 in key 120, and the hub 186 of end portion 182 having a recess 190. Adjacent end wall 180 is a circular-shaped member 192, see also FIG. 8, having ears 194 and 196 thereon with a stud 198 secured to ear 194 and a stud 200 secured to ear 196, the ends of the studs 198 and 200 being contactable with the inner surface of end plate 180, as seen in FIG. 5. The member 192 has a hub 202 for mating with recess 188 in hub 184 for support of the member in the line of typewheels. Next in line is the typewheel 111 with the twelve teeth and type characters thereon, the wheel having a recess 204 in one side thereof for mating with a hub 206 on the member 192 and on the opposite side from the hub 202. Typewheel 151 has a recess 208 therein for mating with a hub 210 on wheel 111, and except for the .width of succeeding wheels 152-156, each is identical to wheel 111 in having a recess and a hub cooperating with a hub and a recess in adjacent wheels. A second circular-shaped member 212 is on the left hand side of the typewheel line with ears 214 and 216 and studs 218 and 220 serving the same function those of the mem ber192 on the right hand side, i.e. the ends of the studs 218, 220 being contactable with the inner surface of end plate 182, as seen in FIG. 5. Typewheel 156 also includes a recess 221 in one side for the hub of the preceding typewheel 155, and a hub 222 for mating with a recess 224 in the member 212, such member having a hub 228 cooperating with recess 190 in hub 186 of end plate 182. The several typewheels 111, 151-156 are thus supported in a manner wherein each wheel has a recess and a hub for fitting and mating with an adjacent wheel, the fit being such that the wheels are adequately supported in the line-up, but are free to rotate during the setting or indexing thereof. Additionally, the members 192 and 212 each have a pair of notches 230 and 232 (FIG. 8) cut therein for reception of the rib 126 of key 120 when the key is inserted into aperture 131 of the print drum 110 for storage of the key 120' after setting of the typewheels 111, 151-156. The notches 230 and 232 also correspond in shape with the groove be tween the teeth of the typewheels and are located 180 degrees apart so that in any indexed position of the typewheels 111, 151-156, the set-up key 120, when in the storage position (see FIG. 4), will maintain all the wheels 111, 151-156 and the circular members 192, 212 in precise position.

The members 192 and 212 also include serrated portions on opposite sides thereof, the serrated portion 240 on the right side of the member 192 shown in FIG. 8 being oflesser circumferential length (approximately one-quarter inch) than the serrated portion 242 on the left side of the member 192, this being also true for member 212 although reversed in position for the left hand side. In the position shown in FIG. 4, the member 212 is set in a manner that the serrated portion 240 is exposed to be engageable with the label 59 as the print drum 110 is rotated, such engagement serving to advance the label 59 a predetermined distance for printing the bar code data 116. If such data 116 is desired to be printed at the bottom of the label 59, the serrated portion 240 will grip the label 59 and advance it approximately the onequarter inch for proper positioning for printing by the hammers 80. If such data 116 is not desired to be printed, the index key 120 is removed from its storage aperture 131 adjacent the typewheel assembly in print drum 110 and the members 192 and 212 are rotated 180 so as to expose the serrated portion 242 for engagement with the label 59 and thereby drive or advance the label approximately one-half inch to position it for further printing. It should be noted that the face view of the label 59, FIG. 7, is not drawn to scale but is representative of the format to be printed thereon by the hammers 80 and the pressure roller 66. While so setting the members 192 and 212, the detents 130 are sufficiently biased by springs 133 to maintain the typewheels 111, 151-156 in position as the members 192, 212 are rotated with the studs 198, 200 sliding along the inside surface of end wall 180 and with the studs 218, 220 sliding along the inside surface of end wall 182. Upon setting of the members 192 and 212 to the new position, the index key 120 is inserted into the storage aperture 131 to lock the various elements (the members 192, 212 and the typewheels 111, 151-156) in alignment.

In the operation of the label printing machine, the typewheels 111, 151-156 are set up or indexed by inserting the special key into the cylindrical space formed by the bushing portions 122, the circular members 192, 212 and by the tongue and groove construction, more specifically the hub and recess configuration of the typewheels 111, 151.456 for supporting the wheels in the aligned manner, the key 120 is then withdrawn in increments to the respective wheels and rotated along with each typewheel to the desired position. With the index key 120 fully inserted along the typewheels 111, 151-156, the key 120 is rotated in a counterclockwise direction to cooperate with the bias of the detents 130, such rotation bringing the bushing portion 122 and the typewheel 156 to the desired type charac ter position so as to be exposed in window 108 of the drum 110. In the fully inserted position of the key 120, the indentation 128 nearest the handle 121 is engaged by the detent 191 in the hub 184 of end wall 180 and rib 126 of the key 120 cooperates with notch 124 to rotate the typewheel 156. Withdrawing the index key 120 to the position of the next typewheel 155, and with an indication of the detent 191 being removedfrom the rightmost notch 128 and slipping into the next notch to the left, the key is now in position to index typewheel by engagement of the rib 126 with notch 124 of the bushing portion 122. The key 120 thus positions the various typewheels 111, 151156 as it is rotated at each respective wheel and withdrawn in incremental and successive manner until all wheels are set or indexed. It should be noted that there are seven indentations 128 in the key 120 corresponding to the positions of the seven typewheels 111, 151156 so that at any time the number of indentations exposed on the key 120 can be used to determine at which wheel the rib 126 is engaged. Additionally, if only one or two typewheels require resetting, the number of notches 128 can be observed and the operator then knows which wheel or wheels to reset. Further to this, a color code can be placed on the'index key 120 with different colors (say in striped manner) assigned to the typewheels.

The label supply drive motor 16 is activated by means of a micro switch (not shown) in the circuitry, such switch being controlled by the hammer lever control arm 90 and connected to the supply roll drive roller 34-, or by means of a photocell (not shown) used in conjunction with the timing disk 83. The drive motor 16 advances the label paper or tape 14 until the photocell assembly 58 senses a hole or :notch in the paper or tape 14, and which causes the drive motor to be de-energized, this manner of sensing, being utilized in the case of preprinted label stock which includes such holes or notches along the edges thereof, If standard label stock is used, the length of each label can be determined and controlled by means of the cam operated micro switch (not shown) attached to one end of the supply roll drive 34, as mentioned above, and one revolution of the drive roller 34 will then determine the label length. At such time of de-energization of the supply roll drive motor 16, the leading edge of the label paper 14 will be under the single label drive roller 66 and the label paper shear knife solenoid 52 is activated to shear the paper 14 at the proper length to provide the label 59, which label may be one and one half or two inches in length as presently used in the industry. If the shear assembly is set or adjusted for two inch length labels, the shear assembly including the shear knife 42 and shear bar 48 may be advanced leftward or the photocell assembly 58 may be moved to the right to obtain labels of lesser length.

After shearing of the label paper 14 to provide, say a two inch label 59, the spring clutch 68 is engaged to be driven by the main drive motor 70 and the print drum 110 is rotated whereupon the ink roller 114 applies ink to the characters 115, the code bars 116, and the inserts 117, 118, and 119 on the periphery of the print drum 110 and including the type characters on the typewheels 111, 151156 making up the print cylinder or typewheel assembly 112. In addition to the data con tained on the typewheels, and as described above, the print cylinder 112 also includes the members 192, 212 at each end of the typewheel assembly and provided with the serrated teeth 240, 242 to advance the label 59. The arcuate length of these serrations on the members 192, 212 will be set by the operator for the printing application wherein, in the case of the bar code data 116 being printed on the label 59 the members 192, 212 are set so as to advance the label approximately one-fourth inch such as is shown in FIG. 4 by the lesser number of serrations shown on the right hand side of the printing cylinder 112 to be engageable with the label 59. If such bar code data 116 is not to be printed, the serrated members 192, 212 will be rotated 180 to position the greater number of serrations on the right-hand side of the printing cylinder 112 to be engageable with the label 59 to further advance the label so as to start printing further from the leading edge of the label. If such bar code data 116 is to be printed, it will occupy the bottom or leading edge of the label 59 (FIG. 7) wherein the label will be properly positioned at the print cylinder 110 as it is advanced under the single label drive roller 66 with the serrations 240 driving the label from right to left. During movement of the label 59, the data contained on the print cylinder typewheels 111, l51156 will be printed on the label by reason of passing of the typewheels under the single label drive roller 66 to print the operator code, the grade of the commodity, and the date, as seen in FIG. 7 and designated as 161. Atthe proper time in the cycle, movement of the label 59 is stopped in its travel by reason of the serrations 240 or 242 having advanced the label to a position where the leading edge of the label 59 is adjacent the print hammers 80.

As the print drum 110 continues to rotate, the bar code data 116 passes under the print hammers 80 and timing pulses received from the electromagnet 82 are used to fire the appropriate print hammers 80 against the code bars 116 on the print drum 110. In line with printing of the bar code 116, the inner and outer end plates 180, 182 of the print drum ll contain the raised camming surfaces 170, 172 to insure that the single label drive roller 66 will not contact the freshly inked engraved bars 116 as they approach the print station and to thereby permit proper printing of the bar code 116 by the print hammers 80. After the bar code data 116 has been printed, rotation of the hammer restore cam 86 positions the print hammers 80 in nonprinting condition against the hammer hold magnet assembly 84.

As the print drum 110 continues to further rotate, the commodity or ingredient insert 119 is inked by the ink roller 114 and then passes under the single label drive roller 66 to print the commodity information, as shown on the label 59 in FIG, 7 and designated as 168. As with the members 192, 212 of the print cylinder 112, each of the inserts 117, 118, and 119 also contains the serrations 89 to advance the label 59 and to determine the height of t'he printing'a'rea. Printing' vis accomplished 12 when the insert passes under the label drive roller 66 while the serrations 89 on the appropriate insert advance the label 59.

The information containing the words weight, value, and price, as seen in FIG. 7 and designated as 164, is next printed on the label after inking of the insert 118 by the ink roller 66. In the case of preprinted labels, where such words may already be on the label, the insert 118 will be used, by reason of the serrations 89 thereon, to advance the label 59 without printing and position the label under the print hammers 80. The numeric data, as shown in H6. 7 and desiganted as 166, relating to the weight, value, and price, which data is in the form of type characters 115 engraved on the periphery of the print drum 110, is then selected and printed by the print hammers following proper inking by the roller 114, and the hammers 80 are again restored to a ready condition against the hammer hold magnet 84.

The final printing operation is that of printing the store name and address, as shown in FIG. 7 and designated as 162, wherein the insert 117 carries the information thereon and after inking by the roller 114, the rotation of the print drum 110 moves the insert 117 under the single label drive roller 66 to imprint the data on the label 59. Upon completion of this printing, the print drum 110 will stop rotating. The label ejector so lenoid 102 is then activated for driving the label ejector roller against the label 59 and rotation of the roller 100 by the main drive motor 70 causes the label 59 to be driven from the chute area formed by the trailing edge of guides 60 and 62. At this point in time, the label supply drive roller motor 16 is again activated to initiate'a new printing cycle.

It is thus seen that herein shown and described is a multiple station label printing machine which is simple and compact, which is readily adjustable to be adapted for various label formats, and which includes modular construction to provide for ease of servide. The printing machine provides for a line of printing effected by the print hammers and a line of printing effected by the roller, the print hammers being positioned in spaced relationship from the roller to enable selective engagement of the hammers and of the roller with the record material for printing thereon. ln this respect, the roller is moved to a non-operating position during the time of printing of certain of the type elements by the print hammers. The apparatus enables the accomplishment of the objects and advantages mentioned above, and while only one embodiment of the invention has been disclosed herein, certain variations thereon may occur to those skilled in the art. It is contemplated that all such variations, not departing from the spirit and scope of the invention hereof, are to be construed in accordance with the following claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A printing machine including a supply of record material,

means for driving said record material in a path toward a printing station,

printing apparatus comprising a first drum rotatably mounted on an axis along the path of said record material,

said first drum having fixed and removable recording elements on the periphery thereof in spaced relationship, a second drum rotatably mounted on an axis substantially parallel to and spaced from the first mentioned axis, said second drum being substantially enclosed by said first drum and having settable recording elements on the periphery thereof in spaced relationship and including advancement means for advancing said record material to permit printing on different areas thereof aperture means in said first drum adjacent said second drum, a

plurality of print hammer means operable into contact with said record material and against certain of said recording elements,

roller means spaced from said print hammers and movable to a non-operating position during the time of printing by said print hammer means to be selectively engageable with said record material to press said record material against certain other of said recording elements to effect printing on said record material, and means insertable into said second drum and engageable with said settable recording elements for setting thereof and insertable into said aperture means to be engageable with said settable recording elements and with said advancement means for looking thereof.

2. [n a label printer having a record material supply, means for driving the record material in a path toward a printing station, means for severing the record material into predetermined lengths so as to form individual labels, and means for driving said labels past said printing station, the improvement comprising a first printing cylinder rotatably mounted on an axis along the path of said record material, said cylinder having fixed and removable type characters on the periphery thereof in spaced relationship, a

second printing cylinder rotatably mounted on an axis parallel to and spaced from the first-mentioned axis, said second cylinder having individually settable type wheels with characters on the periphery thereof in spaced relationship and including advancement means for advancing said labels to permit printing on different areas thereof, aperture means in said first cylinder adjacent said second cylinder, a

plurality of print hammer means operable into contact with said record material and against certain of said type characters for printing of said labels,

roller means adjacent said print hammers at said print station and movable to a non-operating position during the time of printing by said print hammer means and engageable with and pressable against certain other of said type characters for printing of said labels, and

key means insertable into said second cylinder and engageable with said type wheels for setting thereof and insertable into said aperture means to be engageable with said type wheels and with said advancement means for locking thereof.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US196025 *Jan 27, 1877Oct 9, 1877 Improvement in printing-presses
US1028199 *May 12, 1910Jun 4, 1912E L ThurstonTicket-issuing machine.
US1605188 *Apr 3, 1922Nov 2, 1926 Pbinting machine
US2179269 *Nov 24, 1936Nov 7, 1939Pitney Bowes Postage Meter CoAdjustable printing die
US2822751 *May 23, 1955Feb 11, 1958 Haseloff
US2933038 *Dec 29, 1955Apr 19, 1960Burroughs CorpCode recording apparatus
US3223033 *Feb 8, 1962Dec 14, 1965Svenska Dataregister AbRecording assembly having character and code markings
US3420163 *Apr 13, 1967Jan 7, 1969Gerhard RitzerfeldNumbering arrangement for selective printing machines
US3468479 *Dec 28, 1967Sep 23, 1969Sauter Charles FrankGolf scoring device
US3731622 *Mar 18, 1970May 8, 1973California Electro ScientIntermittent type drum advancing means in a high speed printer
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4040345 *Apr 12, 1976Aug 9, 1977Cubic-Western DataTicket advance and printer mechanism
US4092920 *Nov 10, 1976Jun 6, 1978Litton Business Systems, Inc.Document imprinter
US4116127 *Sep 27, 1976Sep 26, 1978Brandt-Pra, Inc.Ticket counter and endorser
US4326460 *Aug 5, 1980Apr 27, 1982Postalia GmbhIndicating device for an option printing cylinder
US4490058 *Aug 2, 1983Dec 25, 1984Hitachi Koki Co., Ltd.Line printer and type carrier for use therein
US4625644 *Jul 1, 1985Dec 2, 1986Bouliane Mark HApparatus for an offset printing press
US4939674 *Apr 22, 1988Jul 3, 1990Engineered Data Products, Inc.Label generation apparatus
US5024153 *Sep 10, 1986Jun 18, 1991Pitney Bowes Inc.Print drum for a postage meter
US5848401 *Nov 25, 1996Dec 8, 1998Goldberg; Robert M.Hand-held portable postage meter that uses pre-printed tape
US6178718 *Oct 15, 1998Jan 30, 2001Focke & Co. (Gmbh & Co)Packaging machine, in particular for the production of cigarette packs
US6277456 *Sep 24, 1999Aug 21, 2001Brady Worldwide, Inc.Labeling media and method of making
US7036732Nov 15, 2004May 2, 2006Cubic CorporationUniversal ticket transport
US7322521Mar 2, 2006Jan 29, 2008Cubic CorporationUniversal ticket transport
Classifications
U.S. Classification101/91, 101/99, 101/93.12, 101/110, 101/66
International ClassificationB41J1/00, B41J1/48, B41J29/40
Cooperative ClassificationB41J29/40, B41J1/48
European ClassificationB41J1/48, B41J29/40