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Publication numberUS3922144 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 25, 1975
Filing dateMar 4, 1974
Priority dateMar 5, 1973
Also published asDE2310899A1
Publication numberUS 3922144 A, US 3922144A, US-A-3922144, US3922144 A, US3922144A
InventorsZollner Wolfgang
Original AssigneeHenkel & Cie Gmbh
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Process for applying liquid freshening agents to textile threads
US 3922144 A
Abstract
A process and an apparatus for the application of liquid freshening, brightening or finishing agents to textile threads or yarn, in which a free-falling jet of liquid is directed onto the threads with the additional use of reduced pressure.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Ziillner Nov. 25, 1975 [54] PROCESS FOR APPLYING LIQUID 2,419,695 4/1947 Shuttleworth et a1. 68/202 X FRESHENING AGENTS o TEXTILE 3,391,551 7/1968 Hasler et a1 THREADS 3,620,662 11/1971 Mlyamoto et a1 68/205 R X Inventor: Wolfgang Ziillner, Dusseldorf,

Germany HenkeI & Cie GmbI-I, Dusseldorf, Germany Filed: Mar. 4, 1974 Appl. No.: 447,636

Assignee:

Foreign Application Priority Data Mar. 5, 1973 Germany 1. 2310899 U.S. CI. 8/1512; 68/205 R Int. Cl. D06B 1/04 Field of Search 8/151, 151.2; 68/20, 200,

68/205 R, DIG. 5, 202, 203; 118/50 References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 5/1937 Schramek et a1. .1 68/205 R FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 997,209 9/1951 France 8/151 2,140 12/1960 Japan 68/205 R Primary ExaminerHarvey C. Hornsby Assistant Examiner-Philip R. Coe Attorney, Agent, or FirmHamm0n & Littell [57] ABSTRACT A process and an apparatus for the application of Iiquid freshening, brightening or finishing agents to textile threads or yarn, in which a free-falling jet of liquid is directed onto the threads with the additional use of reduced pressure.

6 Claims, 1 Drawing Figure T0 VACUUM US. Patent Nov. 25, 1975 3,922,144

PROCESS FOR APPLYING LIQUID FRESHENING AGENTS TO TEXTILE THREADS PRIOR ART It is known to dress or finish textile threads with liquid freshening agents by passing the threads over rollers which dip into a bath of the agent and transfer the liquid to the threads. This method of application has two significant disadvantages. On the one hand, it only partly succeeds in uniformly applying the agent to the threads. On the other hand, it has the intrinsic operational defect that, due to the high speed of the threads, the liquid is thrown off both directly behind the rotating rollers and also behind each place where the threads alter their direction; and thus the liquid can readily contaminate the machine. This disadvantage can only be avoided by an uneconomically slow rate of travel of the threads.

OBJECTS OF THE INVENTION It is an object of the invention to provide a process by which the aforesaid disadvantages are eliminated.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a process for applying liquid freshening agents to textiles by which the finishing agent is uniformly distributed over the cross-section of the yarn after the treatment thereof, and by which the apparatus will not be contaminated by splashing of the finishing agent.

These and further objects of the present invention will become apparent as the description thereof proceeds.

DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to a process and for the application of liquid freshening, brightening or finishing agents to textile threads or yarn, in which a freefalling jet of liquid is directed onto the threads with the additional use of reduced pressure.

The invention first of all relates to a process for the application of liquid freshening agents to textile threads, or yarn in which the agent in the form of a regulatable, free-falling jet of liquid, the diameter of which corresponds approximately to the diameter of the thread, is directed onto the threads which pass over a vacuum nozzle connected to a vacuum of to 400 Torr and arranged coaxially to the jet of liquid, and the axis of the liquid jet is almost perpendicular to the axis of the thread.

More particularly the present invention is directed to a process for applying a liquid finishing agent to textile threads or yarn comprising directing a regulatable, free-falling jet of liquid finishing agent onto a moving textile yarn, the diameter of said jet corresponding approximately to the diameter of said yarn, passing said yarn over a suction zone maintained at a vacuum pressure of from about 10 to 400 Torr, said suction zone having an outlet arranged coaxially with said jet of liquid finishing agent, and the axis of said jet being approximately perpendicular to the axis of said yarn; and recovering said textile yarn finished with said liquid agent.

More particularly the present invention provides an apparatus for applying a liquid finishing agent to a textile thread or yarn according to the process of the invention comprising means containing a supply of liquid finishing agent; a nozzle means having an outlet for discharging said finishing agent onto a textile yarn and connected to said containing means, said discharge nozzle means mounted at approximately a right angle to the travel of said yarn, said outlet of said discharge nozzle having a diameter corresponding approximately to the diameter of said yarn; a regulating valve connected in series between said containing means and said discharge nozzle; and a suction means having an outlet positioned coaxially with said discharge nozzle at a distance below said discharge nozzle of about i to 10 times the diameter of said yarn, said suction outlet having a diameter about 0.5 to 2 times the diameter of said yarn, said suction outlet having a guide means over which said yarn passes and being connected to a vacuum means.

It has surprisingly been found that by the direction of a free-falling jet of liquid onto the thread, in which the diameter of the jet corresponds approximately to the diameter of the thread, good results are obtained if in addition the threads are passed over a vacuum nozzle arranged coaxially to the jet of liquid and connected to a vacuum of 10 to 400 Torr.

The present invention has the advantages that the quantity of freshening agent to be taken up by the threads can easily be adjusted in operation before its issue from the nozzle by the corresponding regulation in the flow rate of the liquid flowing, by alteration of the cross-section of the supply pipe. On the other hand, the regulatable vacuum additionally causes a corresponding alteration in flow rate of the freshening agent flowing from the supply pipe. Further, excess liquid is at the same time withdrawn by the vacuum into the suction nozzle and is therefore prevented from being splashed uncontrollably by the thread moving past at high speed. The liquid is sucked through the multifilament yarn; and consequently a very uniform distribution of the liquid throughout the cross-section of the yarn is attained.

The latter is therefore of particular advantage, since the time necessary for the prior art processes in which the freshening agent is diffused in the yarn and which generally takes a few hours, is reduced by the process according to the invention to the time of the momentary application; i.e. to less than I second. Yarns finished according to the invention can immediately be further processed, in contrast to the yarns finished by the prior art processes.

For carrying out the process, a suitable apparatus comprises a storage tank container for the product and devices for the feeding and the removal of the freshening agent. The apparatus according to the invention has a first nozzle for directing the freshening agent, fixed at approximately a right angle, or perpendicular, to the yarn, and connected in series to a regulating valve. The outlet diameter of this nozzle corresponds to about the diameter of the yarn. There is also a suction, or vacuum, nozzle located coaxially with the first nozzle at a distance about 1 to 10 times the diameter of the yarn below this first nozzle. This vacuum nozzle has a guide means over which the yarn travels; this vacuum nozzle is connected to a vacuum source, such as a suction pump; and the vacuum nozzle has a diameter which corresponds to about 0.5 and 2 times, preferably 1 to 2 times, the diameter of the yarn.

In another embodiment of the invention, it is possible to operate a relatively large number of these devices in parallel and in this manner ensure the simultaneous finishing of many textile yarns.

The apparatus according to the invention is illustrated in the following drawing which is not to be deemed limitative in any manner thereof.

The freshening agent flows through the supply pipe 1 to the nozzle 2. The amount supplied is adjusted by a regulating valve V. The nozzle 2 is mounted in a position at right angles to the path of the yarn 4. The diameter of the outlet 3 of the nozzle 2 corresponds approximately to the diameter of the yarn 4. The suction nozzle is coaxial with the nozzle 2, and the distance between the two nozzles 2 and 5 is about 1 to times the diameter of the yarn. Furthermore the suction nozzle 5 contains the yarn guide 6. Moreover the nozzle 5 is connected to a source of vacuum. The diameter 7 of the suction nozzle 5 is somewhat larger than the diameter of the yarn 4. The jet of liquid discharged from the nozzle 2 falls freely onto the yarn 4. The vacuum in the nozzle 5, which is adjustable to between about 10 and 400 Torr, and preferably between to 50 Torr, then pulls the freshening agent through the yarn 4 and thereby ensures a uniform distribution of the agent throughout the cross-section of the yarn.

In order to carry out the process according to the invention, the generally known freshening or finishing agents are used, which have known formulations. Examples of suitable agents include the following: sulfated or sulfonated derivatives of fats, oils, fatty acids or fatty alcohols; adducts of ethylene oxide or propylene oxide to fatty acids, fatty alcohols, alkyl phenols, glycols etc.; starch, polvinyl alcohol, polyacrylic acid and other polymers. These agents are applicated water, oils or organic solvents, e.g. mineral oil, chlorinated hydrocarbons etc. The solutions should have a viscosity of 2 to 500 cP.

1n carrying out the process, the yarn passes over guide 6 of nozzle 5 which constitutes a suction zone at a speed between 500 and 2000 meters/min, preferably between 800 to 1000 meters/min, with the amount of freshener agent splashed or lost from the system being very minute, for example being less than 1% of the total agent utilized, and preferable less than 0.5% of the total agent utilized.

The amount of freshener agent taken up by the yarn will vary depending on the flow rate, visocity and surface tension of the jet of freshener agent and the speed of the yarn.

The following examples are merely illustrative of the present invention without being deemed limitative in any manner thereof.

EXAMPLE 1 1.2 kg of a commercial texturized endless yarn was finsihed with a freshener agent under the following conditions:

Adduct of 6 to 10 mols of ethylene oxide to decyl alcohol and Freshener agent nonyl phenol in mineral oil so- Amount of freshener taken up by the yarn Amount of freshener 4.6% by weight splashed or lost 0.1% Uniformity of the application 4.6% t 0.2%

The freshener finishing agent was discharged and directed onto the yarn in the form of a free-falling jet of liquid. The diameter of the jet corresponded to the diameter of the yarn. The yarn was itself passed over a suction nozzle which was connected to a vacuum of 25 Torr. The suction nozzle was arranged coaxial to the jet of liquid. The axis of the jet of liquid and the axis of the yarn were perpendicular and enclosed an angle of The finishing agent was essentially uniformly distributed over the cross-section of the yarn after the treatment. The yarn could immediately be further processed. The machine was not contaminated by splashing of the finishing agent.

EXAMPLE 2 Under analogous operating conditions as in Example 1, 1 kg of a commercial polypropylene yarn was processed as follows:

sulfated castor oil in Freshener agent mineral oil solution In this case there was essentially a uniform distribution of the finishing agent over the cross-section of the yarn. The yarn could immediately be further processed. The machine was not contaminated by splashing of the finishing agent.

Although the present invention has been disclosed in connection with a few preferred embodiments thereof, variations and modifications may be resorted to by those skilled in the art without departing from the principles of the new invention. All of these variations and modifications are considered to be within the true spirit and scope of the present invention as disclosed in the foregoing description and defined by the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A process for applying a liquid finishing agent to textile threads or yarn comprising directing a regulatable, free-falling jet of liquid finishing agent of a first diameter and having a first axis onto a moving textile yarn of another diameter and having another axis, said first diameter of said jet corresponding approximately to said another diameter of said yarn; passing said yarn over a suction zone maintained at a vacuum pressure of from about 10 to 400 Torr, said suction zone having an outlet arranged coaxially with said jet of liquid finishing agent, and said first axis of said jet being approximately perpendicular to said another axis of said yarn; and recovering said textile yarn finished with said liquid agent.

2. The process of claim 1, in which said suction zone is maintained at a vacuum pressure of from 15 to 50 Torr.

3. The process of claim 1, in which said yarn passes over said suction zone at a speed between 500 to 2000 meters/min.

4. The process of claim 1, in which said yarn passes over said suction zone at a speed between 800 to 1000 meters/min.

S. An apparatus for applying a liquid finishing agent to a textile thread or yarn comprising means containing charge nozzle at a distance below said discharge nozzle of about 1 to 10 times the diameter of said yarn, said suction outlet having a diameter about 0.5 to 2 times the diameter of said yarn, said suction outlet having a guide means over which said yarn passes and being connected to a vacuum means.

6. The apparatus of claim 2 in which the diameter of said suction nozzle is l to 2 times the diameter of said yarn.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION G Patent NO. 3,922,144 Dated November 25 1975 Inventor(s) Wolfgang Zollner It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below: 0*

Column Line v .1. 35 L and" should be deleted 4 67 to ,Ihese claims should be 6 l0 deleted.

Signed and Scaled this Fourteenth Day of September 1976 O [SEAL] Attest:

RUTH C. MASON C. MARSHALL DANN O Arresting Office Commissioner ufPalenrs and Trademarks

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2080635 *Aug 13, 1934May 18, 1937Baumwollspinnerei GronauDevice for mercerizing cellulose fibers of all kinds
US2419695 *Oct 18, 1945Apr 29, 1947Mohawk Carpet Mills IncMachine for stencilling fabric with suction
US3391551 *Feb 11, 1966Jul 9, 1968Singer Cobble LtdMeans for the application of treatment media to elongate materials
US3620662 *Oct 21, 1969Nov 16, 1971Toray IndustriesMethod and apparatus for intermittently dyeing yarns
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4329750 *Sep 15, 1980May 18, 1982E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And CompanyMethod for applying finish to a yarn
US4397164 *Jan 7, 1982Aug 9, 1983E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And CompanyApparatus for applying finish to a yarn
US5237717 *Nov 26, 1990Aug 24, 1993Milliken Research CorporationWeaving machine
Classifications
U.S. Classification8/151.2, 68/205.00R
International ClassificationD06B1/04, D06B1/08, D06B1/00, D06B1/02, D06B15/04, D06B15/00
Cooperative ClassificationD06B1/04, D06B15/04
European ClassificationD06B15/04, D06B1/04