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Publication numberUS3922827 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 2, 1975
Filing dateJun 1, 1973
Priority dateJun 1, 1973
Publication numberUS 3922827 A, US 3922827A, US-A-3922827, US3922827 A, US3922827A
InventorsRosenblatt Joel H
Original AssigneeRosenblatt Joel H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hyperbolic tower structure
US 3922827 A
Abstract
A tower structure consisting of a central vertical frame shaft surrounded by an outer structure in the form of a hyperboloid of revolution composed of two sets of intersecting straight linear structural elements arranged to define the hyperboloid, the linear elements being connected at their intersections to the central shaft by horizontal radial bracing members. The outer structure may be formed by successively connecting preassembled sub-assemblies consisting of segments of the linear elements with radial bracing members attached thereto. The central vertical shaft contains means of access to the upper levels, such as stairways, ladders, elevators, and the like, and a plurality of horizontal deck levels are provided within and on top of the tower structure.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Unlted States Patent 1 1 1111 3,922,827

Rosenblatt Dec. 2, 1975 I HYPERBOLIC TOWER STRUCTURE 1963, pages 91 & 92.

[76] Inventor: Joel H. Rosenblatt, 12607 Meadowood Drive, Silverv Spring Primary ExammerPr1ce C. Faw, Jr. Md. 20904 22 Filed: June 1, 1973 [571 ABSTRACT [21] APPL No.1366117 A tower structure consisting of a central vertical frame shaft surrounded by an outer structure 1n the form of a hyperboloid of revolution composed of two [52] U.S. Cl 52/245; 52/80 sets of intersecting straight linear structural elements [51] Int. Cl E04h 5/12 arrang d to define the hyperboloid, the linear elel l Field of Search ments being connected at their intersections to the 655, 73 centralshaft by horizontal radial bracing members. The outer structure may be formed by successively References Cited connecting preassembled sub-assemblies consisting of UNITED STATES PATENTS segments of the linear elements with radial bracing 3,300,942 1 H967 Horstman 52/80 x members attached thereto- The central vertical Shaft 3,603,051 9/1971 Lussky 52/245 Contains means of access to the pp levels, Such as 3,618,277 11/1971 Waters 52/245 x Stairways, r elevators, and h li and a pl 3,648,990 3/1972 Stoker 52/245 X rality of horizontal deck levels are provided within and on top of the tower structure.

15 Claims, 17 Drawing Figures I ll 2 t US. Patent Dec. 2, 1975 Sheet 1 0f 9 US. Patent Dec. 2, 1975 Sheet 3 of9 3,922,827

USQPatent Dec. 2, 1975 Sheet4 0f9 3,922,827

Sheet 5 of 9 3,922,827

US. Patent Dec. 2, 1975 Patent Dec. 2, 1975 Sheet 6 of9 3,922,827

US. Patent Dec. 2, 1975 Sheet 7 of9 3,922,827

US. Patent D662, 1975 sheet sofg 3,922,827

FIG. 1?.

50 1 III: 3

U.S. Patent Dec. 2, 1975 Sheet 9 of9 3,922,827

HYPERBOLIC TOWER STRUCTURE This invention relates to building structures, and more particularly to an improved tower structure in the form of a hyperboloid of revolution.

A main object of the invention is to provide a novel and improved tower structure which is relatively easy to erect, wherein wind forces and other lateral forces are efficiently resisted by axial forces developed in outer linear structural members, and wherein the outer linear structural members serve as supporting means as well as bracing means for the structure.

A further object of the invention is to provide an improved tower structure which employs relatively lightweight structural members to maintain itin erect position and to resist lateral and other forces, the structural elements employed being relatively expensive, being easy to install, and providing a final structure of high strength and pleasing appearance.

A further object of the invention is to provide an improved tower structure substantially in the form of a hyperboloid of revolution composed of intersecting straight linear structural elements and having a central vertical shaft portion which may contain means of access to the various levels of the tower structure, such as stairways, ladders, elevators and the like, the improved tower structure being capable of erection by the use of preassembled sections which are relatively light and easy to handle and which thereby enable the tower structure to be built economically and without requiring the use of expensive equipment.

A still further object of the invention is to provide an improved tower structure having high structural rigidity and strength relative to the weight of metal employed in the structure and at the same time providing a highly pleasing esthetic effect so that it improves the general appearance of the environment in which it is installed A still further object of the invention is to provide an improved tower which is relatively simple in construction, which is adequately braced to withstand maximum expected wind forces and other types of loading, which has a pleasing shape, and which can be quickly and expensively erected.

Further objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent from the following description and claims, and from the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is an elevational view of a typical hyperboloidal tower structure constructed in accordance with the present invention.

FIG. 2 is an enlarged top plan view of the hyperboloid-defining framework of the tower structure of FIG. 1 and illustrating the manner in which the linear hyperboloid-defining elements are oriented.

FIG. 3 is a developed diagrammatic view of the hyperboloid-defining elements employed in the'tower structure of FIG. 1 and showing intersection points of the structural elements at the various levels of the tower structure.

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary elevational view showing intersection joint elements along a composite linear structural element forming part of the tower structure of FIGS. 1, 2 and 3 and showing the different intersection angles at the various levels of the tower structure.

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary side view substantially showing the intersection joint elements of the composite linear structural elements of FIG. 4 and illustrating the variation of the angle between the horizontal radial brace elements and the intersection segments to which they are connected at the various levels of the tower structure of FIGS. 1, 2 and 3.

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary enlarged vertical crosssectional view taken through the lower portion of the hyperboloidal tower structure shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 7 is an enlarged fragmentary horizontal crosssectional view taken substantially on the line 77 of FIG. 6.

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary enlarged horizontal crosssectional view taken substantially on the line 88 of FIG. 6.

FIG. 9 is an enlarged fragmentary horizontal crosssectional view taken substantially on the line 99 of FIG. 6.

FIG. 10 is an enlarged fragmentary front elevational view of a typical hyperboloid-defining linear structural segment employed in the tower structure of FIG. 1.

FIG. 11 is a side elevational view of the structural segment shown inFlG. 10.

FIG. 12 is an enlarged horizontal cross-sectional view taken substantially on the line 1212 of FIG. 6.

FIG. 13 is a fragmentary horizontal cross-sectional view taken substantially on the line 13--13 of FIG. 14.

FIG. 14 is an enlarged fragmentary vertical crosssectional view taken substantially on the line 14--14 of FIG. 6.

Fig 15 is a vertical cross-sectional view taken substantially on the line 1515 of FIG. 14.

FIG. 16 is an enlarged fragmentary vertical crosssectional view showing the details of the connection of a horizontal radial brace member to its associated hyperboloid-defining structural segment, such view being taken substantially on the line 16-16 of FIG. 17.

FIG. 17 is an enlarged fragmentary perspective view showing a pair of preassembled hyperboloid-defining structural sub-assemblies and showing how they are interconnected and are connected to the interior vertical shaft structure, illustrating the manner in which connections are made at three points for each structural sub-assembly in the course of erection of the hyperboloidal tower structure.

Two general types of tower structures have been commonly employed for many years. The free standing tower is essentially a structure in which all lateral forces are resisted by bending or flexural resistance of the tower shaft. The guyed tower is the alternative form in which the shaft structure resists all vertical loads, in-

cluding the vertical components of forces in the guys,

and lateral forces are resisted by flexible guys capable of tension resistance only. Wind forces of a guyed tower induce tension reactions in the windward guys, and the leeward guys contribute nothing to the support of the tower.

In a tower constructed in accordance with the present invention, the hyperbolic arrangement of the bracing system permits the lateral forces to be resisted in tension in those hyperbolic elements inclined from the ground with components in the direction of the wind, while those inclined in opposition to the wind are capable of providing support in compression reactions. Thy system, according to the present invention, is therefore braced rather than guyed.

Mathematically, a form of tower such as that proposed herein has been known for centuries as the hyperboloid of one sheet, or as the hyperboloid of revolution of one sheet. This form is also one of the family of mathemetically defined forms known for centuties as ruled quadric surfaces. This family of mathematical forms is characterized by the fact that, though the surface is doubly curved in space, it may be generated by straight lines.

In recent years, the development of the use of a variety of structures depending for their stiffness on surface curvature has attracted widespread interest. These structures have led to the evolution of much literature in the field under the generic term thin-shell structures. They have taken their most varied development in moldable materials (concrete, plastics, etc.) which lend themselves to curved surface forms.

The development of structures of these types fabricated of structural steel has been-more limited due to the essentially linear form in which steel members are produced. Shell structures in steel have been developed by applications of line increment approximations of curved surfaces (for example, Fullers geodesic dome), and by application of the other doubly curved ruled quadric surfaces which inherently may be described by systems of straight lines the hyperbolic paraboloid roof form. The concept of the present invention extends the shell structure principles to a vertical form to provide a ruled quadric surface from linear materials and thereby gains the efficiency of a shell structure in a vertical tower form formerly available only to relatively horizontal roof structures. The characteristics of high stiffness for minimum materials used, conversion of bending forces to membrane stresses, and weight savings, well known in the literature of shell theory, all become available to the tower form in the present invention.

Towers in the form of continuously-skinned hyperbolas of revolution have previously been built (for example, the Seattle Space Needle, cooling towers for nuclear power plants, and the like). The structure of the present invention employs an open lattice form of this shell, uniquely suited to fabrication from long linear materials (pipe, tubing, bars, rolled or drawn structural shapes, and the like).

For example, as shown in FIG. 1 a tower structure is illustrated, comprising an intersecting network of pipes, each of which is a line element of the two sets of line families which define a hyperboloid of revolution. The distance between consecutive intersections along each line element will vary with the choice of number of line elements to be used, the ratio of plan diameter to waistline diameter, and the ratio of plan diameter to waistline height. As the number of line elements is increased, the full shell surface is more nearly developed.

As the distance intersections is increased, the length of each structural element forming a segment of a line between intersections is increased, the structural element forming a segment of such a line becoming susceptible to local column buckling, a phenomenon well described in the literature on structural theory. Resistance to local buckling of this type can be provided by selecting a structural member providing adequate radius of gyration in its section geometry, or by providing intermediate bracing to reduce its free buckling length. As will be presently explained in detail, with reference to FIG. 7, 8 and 9, an arrangement of horizontal radial members is employed to provide bracing against local buckling tendencies. Also, rigid ring members could be employed to provide a similar function. An example of a ring member so employed is illustrated in FIG. 9. The radial members also permit lateral forces from the central shaft structure to be transmitted to the external hyperbolic system.

Referring more particularly to the drawing, FIG. 1 shows a typical observation tower 20 constructed in accordance with the present invention. The tower 20 is provided with deck areas at several levels near its top, for example, the deck structures shown respectively at 21, 22 and 23. Access to these deck areas is provided through a central framed shaft 24 containing both elevators and stairways.

In the typical example illustrated, a substantial amount of structure is required for the support of the stairways and guidance of the elevators, and the vertical loading resulting therefrom is carried essentially by the framing of the central shaft structure, presently to be described, the lateral loads being transmitted to the exterior hyperbolic elements. It is to be noted that in other applications within the concept of the present invention, in which the need for vertical traffic volume handling is not so great (for example, radar-radome support towers or the like), the vertical loads could be carried by the hyperbolic elements themselves. In the typical embodiment illustrated in the drawings, the tower 20 is fabricated mainly from steel pipe and rolled structural steel shapes. Other embodiments within the concept of the present invention could be fabricated from other structural materials, including wood, aluminum, a variety of plastic materials with or without reinforcements, or the like.

The central vertical structure 24 comprises a vertical frame of substantially rectangular horizontal crosssectional shape which is fabricated from rolled structural steel members comprising vertical rolled steel structural shapes 25 and horizontal rolled shape-beams 26 secured together to define the aforesaid vertical central frame. As shown in FIG. 9, the vertical frame structure includes the internal horizontal brace members 27 which may comprise rolled steel structural members such as I-beams. The vertical frame structure 24 may be suitably anchored to a horizontal supporting base slab 28.

The hyperbolic outside framing comprises a first set of inclined linear elements 29 connected at their bottom ends to the base slab 28 at uniformly spaced points 30 circularly arranged concentrically with the vertical axis of the central shaft structure 24 and an equally and oppositely inclined second set of linear elements 31 connected to the slab 28 at the points 30 and intersecting the first-named linear elements 29 at a multiplicity of intersection points 32, at which points the linear elements are connected together in a manner presently to be described, whereby to define a hyperboloid of revolution leading upwardly to the top deck 23 in the manner shownin FIGS. 1 and 2, the top ends of the linear elements 29 and 31 are connected together to uniformly spaced points 33 at the periphery of the top deck 23. Lateral bracing may be provided, as will be presently described, by radial brace rods connecting the intersections 32 with the central vertical shaft structure 24 or by the provision of vertically spaced horizontal rigid brace rings 34 connected to the hyperboloid-defining linear elements 29 and 31 in the manner illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 9.

In a typical embodiment, such as is illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2, the base connection points 30 may have an angular spacing of relative to the vertical axis of the tower, and the linear elements 29 and 31 may be so inclined as to have vertically projected angles of 22 /2 relative to and on opposite sides of a vertical radial plane passing through the vertical axis of the tower.

FIG. 3 is a theoretical developed view of the hyperboloidal tower structure defined by the abovementioned linear elements 29 and 31, said linear elements being shown as being somewhat sinuous in the theoretical presentation of FIG. 3, although in actuality the elements are straight. FIG. 3 illustrates various successive levels spaced vertically on the tower structure, designated respectively from one to nineteen, the levels from four to sixteen corresponding to the levels of intersection points 32 of the linear elements 29 and 31. Brace rings 34 may be employed at the levels 2, 3 and 5, and the upper levels 17, 18 and 19 corresponding to the levels of the horizontal deck structures 21, 22 and 23.

The tower structure is provided with a bottom bracing framework comprising vertical post members 38 anchored to the base slab 28 and rising for a substantial height, the post members 38 being at equal radial distances around the vertical axis of the tower and being uniformly spaced relative to each other. The top ends of the post members 38 are connected to the central shaft structure 24 by upwardly and inwardly inclined tie bars 39. The top end of each vertical post member 38 is likewise connected to a pair of outwardly adjacent linear members 29 and 31 by horizontal tie bars provided at their outer ends with linearly triangular-shaped frame portions 41 substantially in the form of equilateral triangles, said frame portions 41 being rigidly connected to their associated tie bars 40. The triangular portions 41 have outer horizontal bar elements 42 at the opposite end portions of which are secured outwardly extending short cylindrical members 43, 43 in which are secured respective fastening bolts 44, 44 which are engaged through the linear members 31 and 29 and are suitably fastened thereto. See FIG. 12.

The top ends of the vertical post members are further rigidly connected by horizontal tie bars 45 which are thereby substantially circularly arranged around the vertical central shaft structure 24, as will be apparent from FIG. 8.

As shown in FIGS. 6 and 7, at levels spaced upwardly along the tower structure, adjacent pairs of linear members 31 and 29 are similarly connected to the central vertical shaft structure 24 by horizontal radially directed tie bar elements 50, similar to the previously described tie bar elements 40, and provided with the triangular outer connection frame elements 41, as shown in FIG. 12. Thus, in a typical embodiment illustrated there are two sets of radial tie bar members and associated outer connection frame structures located above the bottom bracing structure including the verti cal post members 38 and inclined tie bar elements 39. As shown in FIG. 6, a horizontal rigid circular connection ring member 34 may be employed at the next connection level to interconnect the linear members 29 and 31. As above mentioned, additional rigid horizontal ring members 34 may be employed in the same manner at various other levels of the tower structure.

To facilitate the erection of the tower structure and simplify fabrication thereof, the linear members are preferably formed from combinations of preassembled elements such as those shown in FIGS. 10 and 11, the preassembled elements being utilized in the manner illustrated in FIG. 17. Thus, the segments of the linear members may comprise main tubular body portions 51 to the opposite sides of which are rigidly secured aligned flat bar segments 52 and 53 appropriately angled in accordance with specific intersections of the linear members of the tower structure. The aligned flat bar members 52, 53 are apertured, as at 54, to receive fastening bolts and are beveled, as at 55, to facilitate their insertion into the open end portions of body members 51 of adjoining preassemblies.

The end portions of the body members 51 are beveled, as shown at 56, and are suitably shaped to conform with the contours of the body members 51 adjacent the flat bar elements 52, 53 when segments are joined together in the manner illustrated in FIG. 17. Thus, the lower bar elements 52 are inserted into the top ends of the subjacent body members 51 and are fastened thereto by bolts 57 extending through apertures 58 which register with selected pairs of apertures 54. The upper splice bar elements 53 are received in the lower ends of the main body members 51 of the next upwardly adjacent sub-assembly to be connected at the intersection. In this manner, the linear elements may be built up from sub-assemblies such as shown in FIGS. 10 and 11 in the manner illustrated in FIG. 17, and the hyperbolic lattice of the tower structure may be built from such sub-assemblies.

As shown in FIG. 17, the sub-assembly may include a radially directed tie bar element 60 extending from the intersection toward the central shaft structure 24 and being adapted to be horizontally secured to said central shaft structure. Thus, as shown in FIG. 16, a suitably inclined sleeve member 61 may be secured in the body member 51 of the subassembly, being rigidly secured as by welding, or the like, through which a bolt 62 extends which engages through an annular washer 63 welded in the end portion of the associated radial tie bar element 60, the bolt 62 being threadedly engageable with a nut element 64 welded onto the washer 63. Thus, the associated radial tie bar element 60 may be secured to the body member 51 of the sub-assembly and will be properly oriented relative thereto because of the particular orientation of the bolt sleeve element 61 employed in the body member 51. Each tie bar element 60 is provided at its end with a rigidly connected flange 65 adapted to receive fastening bolts 66 for securing the tie bar element to the web 67 of an [beam forming part of the adjacent central shaft structure. Flanges 65 and fastening bolts 66 may be similarly employed with the previously described tie bar elements 39 and 50 for connecting the inner ends of the tie bar elements to the webs 67 of I-beams forming the adjacent portions of the central shaft structure 24, the connections being shown in detail in FIGS. 13, 14 and 15.

As mentioned above, each sub-assembly unit comprises a tubular segment 51 with its aligned bar elements 52 and 53 rigidly secured thereto and its appropriate tie bar tubular element 60 secured thereto by a bolt 62 in the manner illustrated in FIG. 16. In assembling the tower structure, each subassembly unit, such as the unit designated generally at 70, in FIG. 17, is installed by three-point 'securement; first, at the web portion 67 of the adjacent I-beam element of the central shaft structure, employing the bolts 66 with the flange element 65 of the tie bar member 60 to secure the flange element 65 to the web 67 in the manner illustrated in FIG. 17; second, by engaging its downwardly extending bar element 52 in the top end of the tubular member 51 of one subjacent previously installed assembly and securing the member 52 in said top end by means of bolts 57, as shown in FIG. 17; and third, by telescopically engaging the lower end of its tubular member 51 over the upwardly directed bar element 53 of the next adjacent previously installed sub-assembly and fastening said lower end to the upwardly extending bar member 53 by means of bolts 57, as is also clearly shown in FIG. 17. Thus, in beginning the erection of the tower, respective sets of tubular members 29 and 31 are suitably anchored to the base slab 28, the tubular members being of length sufficient to extend up to the fourth level shown in FIG. 3, the members being connected together by the interior framework previously described and illustrated in FIGS. 7, 8 and 9, details of which are also shown in FIGS. 12 to 16. From this point, the remaining construction may be performed by employing the above-described subassemblies '70. At the uppermost level, namely, that shown at No. 19 in FIG. 3, preassembled top members 71 (see FIG. 4) may be employed having downwardly divergent elements 72, 73 suitably designed to interfit with the subjacent installed assemblies 70. The top assemblies 71 are provided with the inwardly directed radial tie bar elements 60 like those employed with the previously described sub-assemblies '70.

As shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, in a typical embodiment of a tower constructed in accordance with the present invention, the top elements 72 and 73 converge at an angle of 14, and the angle of convergency between the bar elements 52 and main body portions 51 of the subassemblies below increases downwardly to a maximum of 30 at the waist portion of the tower, the angle of convergency then decreasing downwardly below said waist portion, the lowermost convergency angle shown, namely, that at the level No. 4 being 16. Similarly, the angles between the radial tie bar members 60 and the planes of the other elements of the sub-assemblies vary. For example, at the top sub-assemblies 7B, the bottom angle between the tie bar element 60 and the plane of the members 72, 73 is 76. This angle increases downwardly with the other sub-assemblies until it reaches a maximum of 90 at the waist portion of the tower structure, after which the top angle decreases so that it becomes 78 at the lowermost sub-assembly, namely, the sub-assembly at the level No. 4.

Design factors such as those above mentioned may be readily calculated prior to the erection of the tower, so that the sub-assemblies can be prepared prior to erection and can be then readily installed in the field.

It will be noted that the sub-assemblies 70 are generally similar in design except that those employed to align with the linear elements 29 will have their radial tie rod element 60 reversed in direction with respect to the sub-assembly elements employed to align with the linear elements 31. In other words, as shown in FIG. 17, comparing the two adjacent sub-assemblies 70 shown therein, the lower sub-assembly 70 has its bar element 53 extending upwardly in a direction to be received in the lower end of the main segment 51 of the upwardly adjacent sub-assembly 70, extending in the direction of the linear members 31 of the structure, whereas the upwardly extending bar element 53 of the upper assembly extends in a direction aligned with the direction of the other structure-defining linear elements 29.

It will be apparent to those skilled in the art that a varietyof alternative means of fabricating the necessary connection details are available, the choice being a matter of engineering and construction economics applied to the intended materials of construction and intended erection conditions. The hyperbolic elements may be butt spliced along their lengths and connected at their intersections by bolting, welding, riveting, be screw connections or by being glued, depending on the materials employed. The intersection connection elements may comprise hub castings, preformed molding, weldments, or may comprise rectangular or circular flat gusset or splice plates to which the intersecting members are attached by any of the connection methods mentioned.

In the detailed specific embodiment illustrated in the drawings and described above, the hyperbolic elements 51 are fabricated from steel pipe in pieces substantially equal to the length of two consecutive segments with an intersection point near its center, at which the associated radial brace element 60 is attached. Each successive level may be erected by connections to the bar elements 53 of the level below, permitting each subassembly including a member 51 and its radial brace element 60 to have three point of support as it is installed, thereby eliminating the need for secondaryvsup-.

porting means during erection before the connections are finally made. Each successive erectionlevel takes the form of an overlapping lattice similar to that of a lamella arch roof in'timber construction.

While a specific embodiment of an improved hyperboloidal tower structure and a method of erecting same have been disclosed in the foregoing description, it will be understood that various modifications within the spirit of the invention may occur to those skilled in the art. Therefore, it is intended that no limitations be placed on the invention except as defined by the'scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1.. A tower structure comprising:

a. the base;

b. two sets of oppositely inclined intersecting circularly arranged linear structural elements-on said base extending upwardly therefrom to define a vertical hyperboloid of revolution of one sheet;

c. central vertical shaft means within said hyperboloid of revolution;

cl. brace means interconnecting said linear elements to resist buckling thereof including radial horizontal tie rod members connecting intersections of said linear members to said central vertical shaft means;

c. said linear structural elements being defined by successively connected segments, said segments having aligned bar elements projecting from the intermediate portions of said segments on opposite sides thereof oriented to interlock with adjacent oppositely inclined segments and defining intersections on the linear structural elements therebetween;

f. means fastening said bar elements to said adjacent segments; and

g. means connecting said radial horizontal tie rod members to said intersections.

horizontal deck structure secured to the top end portions of said linear structural elements.

5. The tower structure of claim 1, and flange means on the free ends of the tie rod members for connecting said free ends to said central vertical shaft means.

6. The tower structure of claim 1, and wherein said segments comprise main tubular body members, said bar elements projecting from opposite sides of the intermediate portions of said tubular body members and being receivable in the ends of the main tubular body members of said adjacent oppositely inclined segments.

7. The tower structure of claim 6, and wherein said tie rod members comprise tubular elements provided at their outer ends with bolt-receiving washer means secured therein, and said means connecting said tie rod members to said intersections comprises bolts extending through the intermediate portions of the main tubular body members and lockingly engaged with said washer means.

8. The tower structure of claim 7, and wherein the intermediate portions of the main tubular body members are provided with tubular guide sleeves rigidly secured therethrough for receiving said bolts.

9. A tower structure comprising:

a. a base;

b. two sets of oppositely inclined intersecting circularly arranged linear structural elements on said base extending upwardly therefrom to define a vertical hyperboloid of revolution of one sheet;

c. central vertical shaft means within said hyperboloid of revolution;

d. brace means interconnecting said linear elements to resist buckling thereof including radial horizontal tie rod members connecting intersections of said linear members to said central vertical shaft means;

e. the top ends of the respective sets of linear structural elements converging and being connected together at their top intersections; and

f. a deck structure peripherally secured to said top intersections.

10. The tower structure of claim 9, and wherein the bottom ends of the respective sets of linear structural elements converge at said base.

11. The tower structure of claim 9, and wherein said base includes upstanding bottom segments of said oppositely inclined linear structural elements.

12. The tower structure of claim 11, and rigid bottom brace means connecting said bottom segments to said centralvertical shaft means.

13. A tower structure comprising:

a. a base;

b. two sets of oppositely inclined intersecting circularly arranged linear structural elements on said base extending upwardly therefrom to define a vertical hyperboloid of revolution of one sheet;

c. central vertical shaft means within said hyperboloid of revolution;

d. brace means interconnecting said linear elements to resist buckling thereof, including radial brace members connected between said central vertical shaft means and said linear elements, said brace members having triangular end loop portions. the linear elements being connected to outer corner portions of said triangular end loop portions.

14. The tower structure of claim 13, and wherein the linear structural elements are defined by successively connected segments.

15. The tower structure of claim 14, wherein said segments have projections extending from their intermediate portions jointed to interlock with adjacent oppositely inclined segments.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3300942 *Feb 10, 1964Jan 31, 1967Dravco CorpMethod of constructing natural draft cooling tower
US3603051 *Feb 5, 1970Sep 7, 1971Universal Oil Prod CoLarge-diameter framed structure
US3618277 *Oct 10, 1969Nov 9, 1971Waters Terrance JHyperboloid buildings
US3648990 *Nov 5, 1968Mar 14, 1972Robert J StokerCooling tower
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4196551 *Sep 26, 1978Apr 8, 1980Bondarenko Vladimir BSectional tower structure
US4246732 *Feb 27, 1978Jan 27, 1981Roland FrehnerPole, in particular for electric lines
US4350549 *Nov 28, 1979Sep 21, 1982Roland FrehnerMethod and apparatus for the production of hollow bodies by winding
US4606674 *Apr 23, 1984Aug 19, 1986Capron Mark EStructural wheel element
US6276095 *Apr 21, 1999Aug 21, 2001Lazaros C. TripsianesDome structure
US7997876Mar 31, 2010Aug 16, 2011General Electric CompanyWind turbine, tower and method for fabricating the same
EP0388221A1 *Mar 16, 1990Sep 19, 1990Ishikawajima-Harima Jukogyo Kabushiki KaishaCooling tower
WO1980002306A1 *Apr 23, 1980Oct 30, 1980Battelle Development CorpPrestressed cooling tower
WO1985004924A1 *Apr 12, 1985Nov 7, 1985Mark E CapronStructural wheel element
WO2000063503A1Apr 18, 2000Oct 26, 2000Lct Dome IncDome structure
WO2012127467A1 *Mar 22, 2012Sep 27, 2012Yossi AmirTower structure
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/245, 52/80.1, D25/62, D25/31, D25/6
International ClassificationE04H5/12, E04H5/00
Cooperative ClassificationE04H5/12
European ClassificationE04H5/12