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Publication numberUS3924807 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 9, 1975
Filing dateNov 1, 1974
Priority dateNov 1, 1974
Publication numberUS 3924807 A, US 3924807A, US-A-3924807, US3924807 A, US3924807A
InventorsLeonora Elizabeth Nash Morgan
Original AssigneeLeonora Elizabeth Nash Morgan
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Humidity altering device
US 3924807 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 11 1 1111 3,924,807

Morgan Dec. 9, 1975 [5 HUMIDITY ALTERING DEVICE 3,204,871 9/1965 Callander 239/55 [76] Inventor: Leonora Elizabeth Nash Morgan,

3700 4 14th St., MOlill6, 111. 61265 Primary Exammerhloyd Kmg [22] Filed: Nov. 1, 1974 T [21] Appl. No.: 519,818 [57] ABSTRAC A humidity altering device formed of a pair of spherically shaped, thin walled containers having a plurality [52] US. Cl. 239/55 of openings in their Walls for the passage of air, one ll'lt. Cl- A61L container being Smaller than and concentrically p Fleld 0f Search 54, 55, 56 ported Within the other container and a moisture sorbent element contained within the inner container [56] References (Med and externally shaped to conform substantially with UNITED STATES PATENTS the interior thereof, the outer surface of the element 2,025,657 12/1935 Ganz 239/55 ing exposed to the air at the openings in the wall of 2,215,988 9/1940 Vivadou et al. 239/55 the inner container and substantially flush with the 2,578,827 12/1951 Munnecke 239/55 uter surface of the wall,

2,830,845 4/1958 Cottle 239/56 3,134,544 5/1964 Copley 239/55 3 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures US. Patent Dec. 9, 1975 3,924,807

FIG,I

HUMIDITY ALTERING DEVICE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to devices for altering the degree of moisture in the air.

It is known in the art to provide, for articles such as cigars, fruits and vegetables and the like which require the maintenance of a given humidity level, a container 0 an integral element of the container, and has no utility 1 except in combination with the container.

Also known in the art are dispensing devices which comprise a pair of containers, one within the other. Examples of such devices are shown in US. Pat. Nos. 2,092,728 issued Sept. 7, 1937 to Dearling; and 3,706,140 issued Dec. 19, 1972 to Brilland et al. Neither of the foregoing devices, however, are operative as humidity altering devices.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is, accordingly, a primary object of the present invention to provide a humidity altering device that is useful with a variety of available containers. It is a further object to provide such a device that is simple in operation and construction and economical to manufacture.

In pursuance of these and other objects, the humidity altering device of the present invention comprises, generally, a pair of similarly shaped, thin walled containers having a plurality of openings in their walls for the passage of air, one container being smaller than and centrally supported within the other container, and a humidity altering element contained within the inner container and externally shaped to conform substantially with the interior thereof, the outer surface of the element being exposed to the air at the openings in the wall of the inner container and substantially flush with the outer surface of the wall. The humidity altering element may, for example, comprise a sponge or other moisture absorbent material, which can periodically be re-moistened to renew its humidifying effectiveness. To this end, the containers are preferably constructed of disconnectable portions to permit removal and replacement of the humidity altering element.

In use, the sponge is removed from the inner container, saturated-with water, and replaced. The entire device is then placed in a substantially air tight container along with the object, such as fresh fruit, for example, for which it is desired to maintain a given humidity level. Since the sponge is suspended within the outer container of the device, the water in the sponge does not directly contact the fruit, but since the walls of the inner and outer containers are perforated, the moisture in the sponge will evaporate and maintain a high degree of humiditywithin the air tight container. When the moisture in the sponge has completely evaporated, the sponge can be removed from the device, resaturated with water, and replaced.

In addition to functioning as a humidity-increasing device, the apparatus of the invention can function as a humidity-decreasing device, if the sponge or other moisture absorbent element is replaced with a desicant such as calcium chloride crystals. When the crystals become saturated with water, they can be removed, dried, and replaced.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS The preferred embodiment of the present invention will be described in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a top view of the humidity altering device of the invention;

FIG. 2 is a side elevational view of the device with portions broken away for the sake of clarity;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged sectional view taken along the line 3-3 of FIG. 1; and

FIG. 4 is an enlarged sectional view taken along the line 4-4 of FIG. 1.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring now to the drawings, the humidity altering device of the invention comprises a pair of inner and outer spherically shaped containers designated by the numerals l0 and 12, respectively. The containers are concentrically disposed and the walls are radially spaced to define the inner and outer surfaces of a ho]- low, spherical air chamber. The inner container 10 is formed of upper and lower hemispherical sections 14 and 16, and the outer container 12 is formed of upper and lower hemispherical sections 18 and 20. The upper section 14 of the inner container 10, like the other sections, may be moulded of plastic, and includes a circular band 22, an end cap 24 with a conical projection 26 formed therein, and a plurality of bands 28 which connect the circular band 22 with the end cap 24 to form a plurality of triangular openings 30 through which the interior of the inner container 10 communicates with the air chamber. The lower section 16 is identical to the upper section 14, and includes a circular band 32, an end cap 34 with a conical projection 36 formed therein, and a plurality of bands 38 which connect the circular band 32 with the end cap 34 to form a plurality of triangular openings 40 through which the interior of the inner container 10 communicates with the air chamber.

The upper section 18 of the outer container 12 includes a circular band 42, an end cap 44 with a projection 46 formed therein to receive the end of the projection 26 on the section 14, and a plurality of bands 48 which connect the circular band 42 with the end cap 44 to form a plurality of triangular openings 50 through which the exterior of the outer container 12 communicates with the air chamber. The lower section 20 of the container 12 includes a circular band 52, an end cap 54 with a projection formed therein to receive the end of the projection 36 on the section 16, and a plurality of bands 56 which connect the circular band 52 with the end cap 54 to form a plurality of triangular openings 58 through which the exterior of the outer container 12 communicates with the air chamber.

The end of the conical projection 26 on the inner section 14 is glued or otherwise bonded to the projection 46 on the outer section 18, to form an upper connecting member connecting the end caps 24 and 44 of the upper hemispherical sections 14 and 18 and the end of the conical projection 36 on the inner section 16 is bonded to the projection on the end cap 54 of the outer section to form a lower connecting member connecting the end caps 34 and 54 of the section 16 and 20. The upper sections 14 and 18 are connected to the lower sections 16 and 20 by means of a hinge 60 and clasp 62 on opposite sides of the bands 42 and 52. As shown in detail in FIG. 3, the hinge 60 comprises a pair of spaced cars 64 and 66 on the band 42, a single car 68 on the band 52 and disposed between the ears 64 and 66, and a pin 70 which extends through aligned apertures in the three ears 64, 66 and 68. The clasp 62, as shown in detail in FIG. 4, comprises a headed projection 72 formed on the band 42, and a notched element 74 on the band 52 adapted to releasably engage the headed projection 72.

Disposed within the inner container 10 is a spherically shaped sponge 76, the outer surface of which is exposed to the air of the openings 30 and 40, and is substantially flush with the outer surface of the bands 28 and 38. In place of the sponge 76, it should be appreciated that a bag of calcium chloride crystals could be substituted, in which case the device would function to reduce rather than increase the humidity level of the surrounding air. It will be apparent that when the clasp 62 is released and the upper and lower sections of the inner and outer containers swing apart on the hinge 60, the sponge 76 will be released and may be removed from the inner container 10.

In use, the sponge 76 is removed from the inner container l0, saturated with water, and replaced. The device is then placed inside an air tight container, such as a plastic bag or the like, with the articles for which it is desired to maintain a high humidity level. Since the sponge is suspended within the outer container 12, the water in the sponge will not directly contact the articles; however, the surface of the sponge is exposed to the air at the openings 30 and 40, and the water can thus evaporate to maintain the humidity of the air at a relatively high level. When the water in the sponge has completely evaporated, the sponge can be removed from the device, re-saturated with water, and replaced.

I claim:

1. A humidifying device comprising: a pair of similarly shaped, first and second, thin walled containers, the second container being smaller than and disposed centrally within the first container, the walls of said containers being disposed in spaced relation to define the inner and outer surfaces of a hollow air chamber, the walls of said containers having a plurality of apertures formed therein through which the interior of the second container and the exterior of the first container communicate with the air chamber; upper and lower connecting members extending through the air chambers and connecting the upper portions and lower portions, respectively, of the containers for maintaining said containers in spaced relation; and a moisture abssorbent element contained within the second container and externally shaped to conform substantially with the interior thereof, the outer surface of the element being exposed to the air in the air chamber at the apertures formed in the wall of the second container.

2. A humidifying device comprising: a pair of spherical, first and second, thin walled containers, the second container being smaller than and disposed concentrically within the first container, with the walls of said containers disposed in radially spaced relation and defining the inner and outer surfaces of a hollow, spherical air chamber, the walls of said containers having a plurality of apertures formed therein through which the interior of the second container and the exterior of the first container communicate with the air chamber, each of said containers being formed of upper and lower hemispherical sections separable in a common plane; an upper connecting member extending radially through the air chamber and connecting the upper hemispherical sections of the first and second containers for maintaining said upper sections in concentric relation; a lower connecting member extending radially through the air chamber and connecting the lower hemispherical sections of the first and second containers for maintaining said lower sections in concentric relation; a spherically shaped moisture absorbent element contained within the second container, the outer surface of the element conforming substantially to the inner surface of the second container and being exposed to the air in the air chamber at the apertures formed in the wall of the second container; and means connecting the upper and lower hemispherical sections of the first container for releasably maintaining said sections in spherical relation and thereby releasably maintaining the spherical moisture absorbent element within the second container.

3. A humidifying device comprising: a pair of spherical, first and second, thin walled containers, the second container being smaller than and disposed concentrically within the first container, with the walls of said containers disposed in radially spaced relation and defining the inner and outer surfaces of a hollow, spherical air chamber, each of said containers being formed of upper and lower hemispherical sections separable in a common plane, the wall of each section including a circular band having one edge lying on said plane, a centrally disposed circular and cap, and a plurality of circumferentially spaced bands connecting the end cap to the circular band and forming a plurality of generally triangular openings in the wall through which the interior of the second container and the exterior of the first container communicate with the air chamber; an upper connecting member extending radially through the air chamber and connecting the end caps of the upper hemispherical sections of the first and second containers for maintaining said upper sections in concentric relation; a lower connecting member extending radially through the air chamber and connecting the end caps of the lower hemispherical sections of the first and second containers for maintaining said lower sections in concentric relation; a spherical moisture absorbent element contained within the second container, the outer surface of the element conforming substantially to the inner surface of the second container and being exposed to the air in the air chamber at the generally triangular openings formed in the wall of the second container; and releasable connecting means on the circular bands of the upper and lower hemispherical sections of the first container for releasably maintaining said sections in spherical relation and thereby releasably maintaining the spherical moisture absorbent element within the second container.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2025657 *Sep 11, 1935Dec 24, 1935Ganz Paul HSachet container
US2215988 *Oct 5, 1939Sep 24, 1940Jean E VivaudouCovered sachet ball
US2578827 *Jul 28, 1949Dec 18, 1951Richard A MunneckeDeodorizer
US2830845 *Apr 2, 1956Apr 15, 1958Cottle Helen GPerfume whiffer
US3134544 *Dec 5, 1962May 26, 1964Copley David W MDispenser having a resilient sponge and piston
US3204871 *Aug 15, 1963Sep 7, 1965Corning Glass WorksPesticide dispensing means
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4217331 *Oct 2, 1978Aug 12, 1980Coleco Industries, Inc.Disposable float dispenser
US4519914 *Mar 31, 1980May 28, 1985Kenji EtaniMethod for treating swimming pool water
US4530120 *Mar 31, 1980Jul 23, 1985Kenji EtaniMethods and apparatus for bathing
US4692314 *Apr 22, 1983Sep 8, 1987Kenji EtaniWater treatment systems
US4731205 *Sep 8, 1986Mar 15, 1988Koch Engineering Company, Inc.Random packing for fluid contact devices and method of preparing said packing
US4775485 *Sep 4, 1987Oct 4, 1988Kenji EtaniFeeding chemical in perforated sphere; swimming pools
US4853131 *Mar 17, 1988Aug 1, 1989Kenji EtaniMethod for water treatment
US4880547 *Mar 16, 1988Nov 14, 1989Kenji EtaniMethods for water treatment
US4995556 *Jan 25, 1988Feb 26, 1991Arnold Iii Benjamin LUnitized sodium bicarbonate deodorizer
US5188772 *Dec 27, 1991Feb 23, 1993Yu Kaung MVapor-liquid contactor
US5520617 *Jan 11, 1995May 28, 1996Multiscience Systems, Pte. Ltd.Massaging device
US5876678 *Aug 22, 1997Mar 2, 1999Harrell; StacyRigidity frame; open cell foam
US5975288 *Mar 6, 1998Nov 2, 199949 Cigar, LlcHumidity altering device
US6106775 *Sep 23, 1999Aug 22, 2000Applied Humidity TechnologiesModifying an atmosphere with an aqueous composition including sodium bicarbonate and acetylsalicylic acid
US6245230 *Jul 28, 1999Jun 12, 2001George RicciImmersible portable dechlorinator
US6379032 *Feb 18, 2000Apr 30, 2002Steve SorensenFlow-through agitator
US6481639 *Jan 22, 1999Nov 19, 2002Ateliers De Conceptions Et D'innovations IndustriellesVolatile substance diffuser without persistence
US6631890 *Jun 30, 2000Oct 14, 2003Apollo Separation Technologies, IncFor contacting gases and liquids in column composed of spherical cage which contains a low apparent bulk density; crush resistance
US6811147Aug 30, 2002Nov 2, 2004Apollo Separation Technologies, Inc.Structured random packing for column
US7014175 *Nov 7, 2003Mar 21, 2006Honnell Marvin APacking for column
US7637485 *Feb 27, 2006Dec 29, 2009Honnell Marvin APacking for column
US8205351Apr 21, 2011Jun 26, 2012Edison Nation, LlcDispensing vessel for clothes dryer
WO2000021580A1 *Oct 6, 1999Apr 20, 2000Applied Humidity TechnologiesApparatus and chemical composition for maintaining atmospheric humidity
Classifications
U.S. Classification239/55, 261/DIG.140, 422/310, 422/265, 261/101, 428/11, 261/DIG.720
International ClassificationF24F6/04, A24F25/00
Cooperative ClassificationF24F6/04, Y10S261/72, B01J2219/30207, Y10S261/14, A24F25/00
European ClassificationA24F25/00, F24F6/04