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Publication numberUS3925946 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 16, 1975
Filing dateNov 16, 1973
Priority dateNov 16, 1973
Also published asCA1009018A, CA1009018A1
Publication numberUS 3925946 A, US 3925946A, US-A-3925946, US3925946 A, US3925946A
InventorsBalinski Henry A, Kuhr Albert F
Original AssigneeUnited States Gypsum Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Reticulated grating
US 3925946 A
Abstract
An improved reticulated grating comprising an apertured sheet and serrations projecting from the aperture edges of at least one of the surfaces of the sheet, each of the serrations of each aperture being skewed with respect to the next adjacent serration, to increase frictional resistance.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

' United States Patent Balinski et a1.

[ Dec. 16, 1975 1 1 RETICULATED GRATING 2.828.843 4/1958 Hill 52/180 '7 W51 Henry Bali-ski, Hoffman E8868 $232??? 21133? 2iil..iiijiijjiiiiiiiii1111;111:1111: 251138 Albert R n Elk Grove Village, 3,752,396 8/1973 Bustin 52/660 both of 111.

[73] Asslgnee: S Gypsum Company Primary Examiner.l ohn E. Murtagh Attorney, Agent, or Flrm-Samuel Kurlandsky, Esq.; [22] Filed: Nov. 16, 1973 Kenneth E. Roberts, Esq.; Stanton T. Hadley, Esq.

[21] Appl. No.1 416,481

57 ABSTRACT [52] US. Cl. 52/180 1 [51] It'll. C1.2 E04C 2/42; E041: 11/16 An improved reticulated grating comprising an aper [58] Fleld of Search 52/177, 660, 180, 670, tured Sheet and serrations projecting from the aper 52/666r 672; 404/1941; 15/215 ture edges of at least one of the surfaces of the sheet, 238-240; 238/14; 119/9 28 each of the serrations of each aperture being skewed with respect to the next adjacent serration, to increase [56] References C'ted frictional resistance.

UNITED STATES PATENTS 2360,416 8/1956 Bates .7 52/180 9 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures US. Patent Dec. 16, 1975 SheetlofZ 3,925,946

US. Patent Dec. 16, 1975 Sheet 2 of2 3,925,946

Fig.6

Fig. 5

RETICULATEI) GRATING BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Platforms, walkways, stair treads, and walk-on gratings of all kinds commonly are reticulated or otherwise perforated to provide enhanced strength, openings for visibility and water run-off, and greater friction. Some of these provide the perforations in the form of spaced apart circular or oblong-shaped apertures, which may or may not be in rows. Friction is reduced by upsetting or otherwise forming the edges of the apertures so that they are given side walls the depth of which exceeds the original sheet dimension. The edge portion of the side wall which is walked upon thus provides an anti-slip projection rising above the surface of the sheet generally forming the grating. An example of such construction is shown in US. Pat. No. 3,181,440.

A more sophisticated construction is the reticulated grating shown in U.S. Pat. No. 2,828,843, wherein the apertures are formed in rows, alternate rows being longitudinally offset with respect to the longitudinal axis of the grating, the aperture side walls being bent so as to form a diamond shape. Apertures in each row are joined by a saddle, the saddles in adjacent rows being located on or adjacent to opposite surfaces of the sheet, thus creating a beam-like structure for enhanced strength. The edge portions of the side walls projecting above at least one of the surfaces of the sheet are provided with serrations or projections which tend to grip whatever is passed over the grating, thus reducing the slippage thereover. This construction has been found to provide, among other things, superior frictional resistance over the supporting surface, except in the transverse direction of the grating. It is this direction that the rows of apertures, and therefore the side walls of the apertures, generally extend. As the serrations are retained in the plane of the side walls, they give maximum slip resistance only in the perpendicular, or longitudinal, direction.

The instant invention is an improvement over the foredescribed reticulated grating, to achieve greater frictional resistance.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The invention relates to a reticulated grating characterized by improved resistance to slippage, or increased frictional resistance, at the surface over which people or objects are transported. More specifically, there is provided an improved grating including a sheet having opposite surfaces and apertures therein, the apertures being defined by side walls having opposite edge portions which are spaced apart by a distance greater than the thickness of the sheet, the side wall edge portions projecting from at least one of the sheet surfaces being provided with serrations thereon to reduce slippage over the sheet; the improvement wherein each of the serrations is skewed with respect to the next adjacent serration of that edge portion whereby slippage over the sheet is further reduced.

Accordingly, it is an object of the invention to provide a reticulated grating having opposite surfaces, at least one of the surfaces being provided with means giving increased frictional resistance to objects slid thereover, regardless of the direction of movement.

It is a related object of the invention to provide such a grating in an inexpensive manner, using a minimum of additional processing.

Other objects and advantages will become apparent upon reference to the following description of the drawings and of the preferred embodiments.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. I is a fragmentary plan view of the improved grating constructed in accordance with the invention;

FIG. 2 is a sectional view taken generally along the line IIII of FIG. 1; 0

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS The invention is described hereinafter as it relates to a certain kind of reticulated grating. However, it is not so limited. It will be appreciated that it can be applied also to any grating, usually for carrying loads, having apertures the edge portions of which are serrated for frictional resistance.

Turning now to FIG. 1, there is illustrated a reticulated grating generally of the type shown in the aforesaid U.S. Pat. No. 2,828,843. That is, the grating 10 comprises an elongate sheet having opposite surfaces or faces 12 and 14, and opposite side margins 16 defining the limits of the transverse axis of the grating. Alternate rows 20 and 20 of apertures 22 are repeatedly formed in the sheet along its longitudinal axis, leaving the side margins unperforated so as to form side flanges which may be bent, as shown in phantom, FIG. 2. The surface 12 thus becomes the top surface over which loads are transported. Each of the apertures is defined by a side wall 24 (FIG. 2) which extends transversely across the plane of the sheet and terminates in opposite edge portions 26 and 28. A bridge or saddle 30, 30 joins each aperture to the next adjacent aperture of the rows 20, 20', respectively. The saddle of each row joins the next adjacent row at the general midpoint of an aperture therein. The saddles 30 generally lie in one plane, while saddles 30' are in another plane spaced from the plane of saddles 30. Thus, the surface of the sheet to which each saddle is adjacent alternates from row to row, thereby forming the row of apertures into a beam-like structure for greater strength. As shown in FIG. 2, only the edge portion 26 need be provided with projections or serrations 40. Alternatively, however, edge portion 28 may have such serrations, shown in phantom, FIG. 2, albeit transversely spaced from those of portion 26. As shown in FIG. I, the apertures 22 are thus formed into diamond shapes, the apertures of one row being longitudinallyoffset with respect to the apertures of the next adjacent row.

In accordance with one aspect of the invention, the serrations 40 of each aperture are bent so as to give increased frictional resistance. More specifically, referring to FIG. 3 in particular, one side of the diamond has an odd number of serrations, 41 through 45, while the opposite side has an even number, 46 through 49. This is due to the fact that the serrations of each aperture side are initially punched as mating pairs, as described in the aforesaid US. Pat. No. 2,828,843. Although the total number of serrations for any aperture, projecting from one surface, is shown to be nine, any odd number may, of course, be used.

The serrations are positioned in the final product so that each one is skewed with respect to the next adjacent one for that aperture, projecting from that surface of the sheet. As shown in FIG. 3, this may be achieved by twisting serrations 41, 43, 45, 47 and 49 with respect to the plane of edge portion 26 of the aperture, through an angle alpha. The other serrations remain in the plane of the edge portion. Preferably, alpha equals between about lO and about 15. The result is that no longer do the serrations tend to line up in the transverse direction, but rather they extend in several directions, increasing frictional resistance over surface 12 of the sheet.

FIGS. 4-6 illustrate several alternate embodiments of the invention, wherein the serrations are twisted differently from that shown in FIGS. l-3. Parts similar to those previously described bear the same reference numeral to which the distinguishing suffixes a through c, respectively, have been added.

Thus, FIG. 4 illustrates a serrated aperture 22a identical to that shown in FIG. 3, except that serrations 42a, and 44a, rather than 41a, 43a, and 45a, have been twisted out of the plane of the edge portion 26a, through angle alpha. Serrations 46a-49a remain twisted, or not twisted, respectively, as in the previous embodiment. The result is to produce serrations less than half of which are skewed with respect to the aperture edge portion from which they project.

In FIG. 5, the same serrations 40b are twisted with respect to the edge portion as in FIG. 4, except that serrations 47b and 49b have been twisted in opposite directions. The result is that diagonally opposite serrations 42b, 49b are generally mutually parallel, as are diagonally opposite serrations 44b, 47b.

FIG. 6 illustrates each and every one of the serrations 410 through 49c being skewed with respect to the edge portion 26c from which they project. As in each of the previous embodiments, the angle through which the serration is twisted is between about and about The manner and apparatus for achieving the aforedescribed configurations is generally that set forth in the aforesaid U.S. Pat. No. 2,828,843, as well as the companion U.S. Pat. No. 2,828,792. The twisting of the serrations out of the plane of the aperture edge portions may be achieved by dies which angularly deflect the appropriate serrations at the time the aperture slits are initially punched. Thus, a minimum of additional processing is required in that the skewing or twisting is achieved during the other processing of the sheet.

Although the invention has been described in connection with certain preferred embodiments, it is not intended that it be limited thereto. Rather it is intended that the invention cover all alternate arrangements, equivalents, and embodiments as may be included within the scope of the following claims.

What is claimed is:

1. In a grating including a sheet having opposite surfaces and apertures therein, said apertures being defined by side walls, each said side wall extending transversely across the sheet to opposite edge portion which are spaced apart by a distance greater than the thickness of said sheet, the side wall edge portions projecting from at least one of said sheet surfaces being provided with serrations thereon to reduce slippage over the sheet;

the improvement wherein at least alternate serrations are each twisted through an angle with respect to the plane of the edge portion of the aperture, the resulting structure being so arranged that each of said serrations is skewed with respect to the next adjacent serration of that edge portion whereby slippage over the sheet is further reduced.

2. The improved grating as defined in claim 1, wherein less than one half of said serrations projecting from one of said surfaces is skewed with respect to said edge portion from which they project.

3. The improved grating as defined in claim 2, wherein said apertures are diamond shaped.

4. The improved grating as defined in claim 3, wherein for at least one of said surfaces, each of said skewed serrations is generally parallel to the skewed serration diagonally opposite to it in that aperture.

5. The improved grating as defined in claim 1, wherein said grating has a longitudinal axis and a transverse axis, the apertures are in rows, and wherein the apertures of each row are longitudinally offset with respect to the apertures of the next adjacent row.

6. The improved grating as defined in claim 5, wherein the adjacent apertures of each row are joined by a saddle, said saddle of each row being located generally in a single plane, the planes of said saddles of adjacent rows being spaced apart.

7. The improved grating as defined in claim 1, wherein said apertures are diamond shaped.

8. The improved grating as defined in claim 1, wherein the apertures are in rows and the adjacent apertures of each row are joined by a saddle, said saddle of each row being located generally in a single plane, the planes of said saddles of adjacent rows being spaced apart.

9. In a grating including a sheet having opposite surfaces and apertures therein, said apertures being defined by side walls, each said side wall extending transversely across the sheet to opposite edge portions which-are spaced apart by a distance greater than the thickness of said sheet, the side wall edge portions projecting from at least one of said sheet surfaces being provided with serrations thereon to reduce slippage over the sheet;

the improvement wherein at least alternate serrations are each twisted through an angle with respect to the plane of the edge portion of the aperture, the resulting structure being so arranged that each of said serrations is skewed with respect to said aperture edge from which it projects whereby slippage over the sheet is further reduced.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2760416 *May 4, 1953Aug 28, 1956Beulah H BatesGrate construction
US2828843 *Oct 12, 1951Apr 1, 1958Globe CompanyReticulated sheet material
US2830509 *Apr 20, 1954Apr 15, 1958Leopold BustinGrating
US3672111 *Nov 29, 1968Jun 27, 1972Stanoray CorpReticulated bar grating
US3752396 *Jul 16, 1971Aug 14, 1973Bustin LTraction mat
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4596731 *Sep 17, 1984Jun 24, 1986Cudmore Warner J GGrass protecting walkway grid
US5979139 *Jan 6, 1998Nov 9, 1999Aero Transportation Products, Inc.Lightweight, self-supporting paneling
US7823339 *May 2, 2003Nov 2, 2010Huber Jr Edmund BurkeWeep hole screen
US8397466Oct 5, 2005Mar 19, 2013Connor Sport Court International, LlcTile with multiple-level surface
US8407951Apr 3, 2007Apr 2, 2013Connor Sport Court International, LlcModular synthetic floor tile configured for enhanced performance
US8424257Apr 4, 2011Apr 23, 2013Mark L. JenkinsModular tile with controlled deflection
US8505256Jan 29, 2010Aug 13, 2013Connor Sport Court International, LlcSynthetic floor tile having partially-compliant support structure
US8596023May 27, 2010Dec 3, 2013Connor Sport Court International, LlcModular tile with controlled deflection
US8683769May 5, 2010Apr 1, 2014Connor Sport Court International, LlcModular sub-flooring system
US8881482Jul 9, 2012Nov 11, 2014Connor Sport Court International, LlcModular flooring system
US8955268Nov 26, 2013Feb 17, 2015Connor Sport Court International, LlcModular tile with controlled deflection
US20110179728 *May 5, 2010Jul 28, 2011Connor Sport Court International, Inc.Modular sub-flooring system
US20120110933 *Nov 4, 2011May 10, 2012Tenax S.P.A.Flooring element made of a plastic material having a net structure
USD656250 *Dec 10, 2010Mar 20, 2012Connor Sport Court International, LlcTile with wide mouth coupling
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/180
International ClassificationE04C2/42, E04F11/02, E04C2/30, E04F11/16
Cooperative ClassificationE04F11/16, E04C2/427
European ClassificationE04C2/42B, E04F11/16
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Nov 25, 1991ASAssignment
Owner name: SANWA BUSINESS CREDTI CORPORATION
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:GS METALS CORP., A CORP. OF DE;REEL/FRAME:005926/0252
Effective date: 19911121
Nov 25, 1991AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: GS METALS CORP., A CORP. OF DE
Effective date: 19911121
Owner name: SANWA BUSINESS CREDTI CORPORATION
Nov 22, 1991AS17Release by secured party
Owner name: GLENFED CAPITAL CORP.
Effective date: 19911121
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Nov 22, 1991ASAssignment
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Free format text: RELEASED BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:GLENFED CAPITAL CORP.;REEL/FRAME:005926/0218
Effective date: 19911121
Feb 8, 1988ASAssignment
Owner name: GLENFED CAPITAL CORP., THREE FIRST NATIONAL PLAZA,
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:GS METALS CORP.;REEL/FRAME:004852/0779
Effective date: 19871109
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Feb 8, 1988AS06Security interest
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Effective date: 19871109
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Jan 4, 1988ASAssignment
Owner name: GS METALS CORP., A CORP. OF DE.
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:USG INDUSTRIES, INC.,;REEL/FRAME:004837/0746
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Jan 4, 1988AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
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Effective date: 19871221
Owner name: USG INDUSTRIES, INC.,