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Publication numberUS3926207 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 16, 1975
Filing dateNov 5, 1974
Priority dateSep 18, 1974
Publication numberUS 3926207 A, US 3926207A, US-A-3926207, US3926207 A, US3926207A
InventorsNoel M Anderson, Arlin W Otto
Original AssigneeMerrill Mfg Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Yard hydrant
US 3926207 A
Abstract
A yard hydrant is designed to eliminate the standard drain hole in devices of this type. Water in the standpipe that previously drained to the outside when the hydrant is closed is collected in a storage reservoir established in the hydrant casing and is available therefrom for subsequent use. The reservoir exists between a sealed bottom end associated with valve means to the source of water supply and a movable top end defined by a sealing means such as cup washers, O-rings or the like on a reciprocal standpipe whereby the size of the reservoir area is expanded with the closing of the valve means to accommodate the drain water and is reduced with the opening of the hydrant valve causing the stored water to pass through the standpipe and out of the hydrant nozzle with the incoming water. The standpipe, hydrant valve means and related parts establishing the reservoir chamber are so attached to the hydrant head that they can be conveniently withdrawn as a unit from the hydrant casing for repairs or maintenance.
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United States Patent 1191 Anderson et al.

[ 1 Dec. 16, 1975 1 YARD HYDRANT [75] Inventors: Noel M. Anderson, Storm Lake;

Arlin W. Otto, Lakeside, both of Iowa [22] Filed: Nov. 5, 1974 [21] Appl. No.: 520,978

Related US. Application Data [63] -Continuation-in-part of Ser. No. 506,956, Sept. 18,

[52] US. Cl. 137/281; 137/283; 137/287; 137/327 [51] Int. Cl. E03B 9/04 [58] Field of Search 137/272, 281,286,287,

Primary ExaminerMartin P. Schwadron Assistant Examiner-Richard Gerard Attorney, Agent, or FirmMorton S. Adler [57] ABSTRACT A yard hydrant is designed to eliminate the standard drain hole in devices of this type. Water in the standpipe that previously drained to the outside when the hydrant is closed is collected in a storage reservoir established in the hydrant casing and is available therefrom for subsequent use. The reservoir exists between a sealed bottom end associated with valve means to the source of water supply and a movable top end defined by a sealing means such as cup washers, O-rings or the like on a reciprocal standpipe whereby the size of the reservoir area is expanded with the closing of the valve means to accommodate the drain water and is reduced with the opening of the hydrant valve causing the stored water to pass through the standpipe and out of the hydrant nozzle with the incoming water. The standpipe, hydrant valve means and related parts establishing the reservoir chamber are so attached to the hydrant head that they can be conveniently withdrawn as a unit from the hydrant casing for repairs or maintenance.

4 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures U.S. Patent Dec. 16,1975 Sheet 1of2 3,926,207

U.S. Patent Dec. 16, 1975 Sheet 2 of2 3,926,207

Z4 11 zZ Qi g YARD HYDRANT CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION This application is a continuation-in-part of our copending application under the same title, Ser. No. 506,956, filed Sept. 18, I974.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to yard hydrants and more particularly to an improvement in hydrant structure wherein the traditional drain hole in such devices is completely eliminated and the water that heretofore drained away to the outside is collected in a storage reservoir and can be subsequently used.

The value and utility of yard hydrants have long been recognized with much of the hydrant art dating back to the late l800s and early l900s and illustrations particularly of the yard hydrant art can be found in the patents of one of the applicants here, Noel M. Anderson, US. Pat. Nos. 2,649,768, 2,649,111, 3,523,549 and 3,672,392. Characteristically of yard hydrants has been the presence of a drain hole at the bottom of the standpipe to carry away water left in such pipe after the valve is closed so that the water is dissipated into the surrounding ground. Notwithstanding the efficiency of such hydrant structures including the draining away of water as indicated, it appears that continuing attention to matters of sanitation, water purity and the like by those concerned with such art and also certain governmental regulatory bodies, indicate that the presence of a drain hole while affording a means to dispel water in the standpipe after the valve is closed, can also be a means for the reentry of water into the hydrant to be intermixed with other water passing therethrough. Under such conditions, the possibility of contamination from impure seepage can result in deleterious effects upon the consumer. In our copending application identified above, we have disclosed a hydrant for accommodating the no drain hole hydrant structure in the form of an expandable and retractible bellows reservoir chamber mounted within the hydrant casing and in the present invention, one of the important objects is to disclose further improved means other than the bellows type reservoir for storing and reusing water in a yard hydrant which has no drain hole to the outside.

Another object herein is to provide a yard hydrant of the above class which includes a storage reservoir established in the hydrant casing into which water in the standpipe that heretofore drained to the outside when the hydrant valve was closed, can be accommodated and stored for future use. More particularly in this regard, it is a further object to provide means by which the reservoir area can be enlarged when the hydrant is closed and reduced when the hydrant is open.

A further object is to provide a yard hydrant as characterized wherein the standpipe, storage reservoir components and valve assembly are so constructed, connected and arranged that they can be easily, quickly and conveniently withdrawn as a unit from the hydrant casing for purposes of repairs and maintenance.

The foregoing objects and such further objects as may appear herein, or be hereinafter pointed out, together with the advantages of this invention will be more fully discussed and developed in the more detailed description of the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of this new yard hydrant with the handle shown in the on" position,

FIG. 2 is an enlarged longitudinal sectional view of the hydrant shown in FIG. 1,

FIG. 3 is a perspective view similar to FIG. 1 but showing the handle in its off position,

FIG. 4 is an enlarged longitudinal sectional view of the hydrant shown in FIG. 3,

FIG. 5 is a cross sectional view taken on the line 5-5 of FIG. 2, and

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary sectional view of the lower portion of this hydrant generally similar to corresponding portions in FIGS. 2 and 4 but showing a second embodiment at the top of the reservoir chamber in the form of a disc plate and O-ring as distinguished from the cup washers in FIGS. 2 and 4.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring to the drawings, this new yard hydrant is designated generally by the numeral 10 and, as seen in FIGS. 1 and 3, includes an elongated upstanding outer casing 12 which houses certain of the working components as will later be described in detail, and a nozzle head assembly 14 journalled on the upper end of casing 12 and vertically reciprocal thereon as will appear, by the handle unit 16. The lower end of casing 12 is securely affixed in any suitable manner as by the threaded engagement 18 (FIG. 2 and 4) to an appropriate cap-like fitting 20 having the downpipe portion 22 for connection to an underground source of water under pressure (not shown) in a well known manner. As a part of fitting 20 there, is provided an axial orifice plug 24 having the externally threaded neck 26 extending into chamber 28 at the bottom of casing 12 and which neck has the further reduced portion 30. An axial bore or passageway 32 through plug 24 communicates with pipe 22 and with chamber 28.

It is to be noted that hydrant 10 is provided with no drain hole to the outside at the lower end of casing 12 which has heretofore been a standard provision in hydrants of this type and reference is now made particularly to FIGS. 2 and 4 relative to our improved storage reservoir chamber 34 to accommodate water previously allowed to drain out and which we shall now describe.

A cylinder 36, open at opposite ends, of any suitable material which may include metal or plastic, is journalled in the lower portion of casing 12 so that the bottom end is disposed within chamber 28. The upper end of cylinder 36 is notched 38 at oppositely disposed points for reasons to be later explained. The lower end of cylinder 36 is secured to the valve housing 40 that serves to form the bottom end of reservoir area 34 and such housing includes a depending portion 42 which is threadably attached to the external threads 26 of plug 24 in a sealed arrangement provided by the O-ring 44.

The valve housing 40 includes a lower chamber 46 in flow communication with passageway 32 and an upper chamber 48 in flow communication with chamber 46 through the valve seat 50 and with the interior of the reservoir chamber 34. A spring loaded check valve 52 is arranged in a well known manner relative to chambers 46 and 48 so that normally, valve end 54 is seated against the underside of seat 50 in closed position and is unseated or moved to open position by pressure from above as will appear.

The position of the upper end 56 of the reservoir area 34 varies in relation to the bottom end thereof in response to the operation of the nozzle head assembly 14 to which reference is now made. Assembly 14 includes a nozzle 58, and an integral nozzle head section 60 from which there depends the integral cylindrical sleeve 62 open at its bottom end 64. The water passageway 66 in nozzle 58 terminates in an upper chamber 68 in head 60 which in turn communicates with a lower chamber 70 through valve seat 72. A spring loaded check valve 74 is mounted in chamber 68 relative to seat 72 and is closed (FIG. 4) when hydrant is closed and is open under water pressure (FIG. 2) when hydrant 10 is open all of which will be referred to later in more detail including the purpose of the air flow check valve 76 provided in the outside wall to the upper chamber 68.

Sleeve 62 is slip-fitted over the top of casing 12 for vertical reciprocal movement thereon as will appear and an elongated standpipe 78 is secured at its upper end by fitting 80 to head section 60 so as to be in flow communication with the lower chamber 70 and extends downwardly to terminate at its lower end 82 within the area forming reservoir 34 and in axial alignment with valve 52. One or more through lateral openings 84 are provided in the wall of standpipe 78 at end 82 about the periphery thereof and an air check valve 86 is provided in the outside wall to the lower chamber 70 in head section 60 in communication with standpipe 78.

The upper end 56 of the reservoir chamber 34 is formed by an externally threaded fitting 88 securely affixed to standpipe 78 (FIGS. 2 and 4) and with opposed cup washers 90 journalled thereon and secured by the upper and lower nuts 92. In this arrangement, it will be noted that washers 90 extend to sealing contact with the internal wall surface of cylinder 36 and an alternative arrangement or modification of such cup washer seal means is illustrated in FIG. 6 where we show a disc plate 94 secured to standpipe 78 and with an O-ring 96 secured peripherally of plate 94 in sealing contact with the walls of cylinder 36. Also secured to standpipe 78 at a point spaced above fitting 88 and above the plane of the upper end of cylinder 36, is a disc-shaped key 98 having opposed turned down lug portions 100 for engaging notches 38 in cylinder 36 which will be further described in the operation of this hydrant.

Handle unit 16 is designed to reciprocate the nozzle assembly 14 together with standpipe 78 as will appear and for this purpose includes a bail 102 having the respective right angle parallel crank arms 104 positioned astraddle of sleeve 62 and pivotally secured thereto as at 106 whereby bail 102 can be moved upwardly and across the top of head section 60 (FIG. 1) and downwardly along the side of sleeve 62 (FIG. 3). A pair of opposed elongated like rigid links 108 (of which only one is shown) are each pivotally secured at corresponding ends to the respective crank arms 104 as at 110 being approximately the juncture of bail 102 ends and crank arms 104 and at their opposite ends, links 108 are pivotally attached as at 112 to a ring or band 114 securely affixed to casing 12 below the plane of end 64 of sleeve 62. A knob 116 is secured to bail 102 to facilitate the operation of unit 16 and thus with hydrant 10 constructed and arranged as described, it is operated in the following manner.

OPERATION Hydrant 10, in the usual arrangement for devices of this type, is mounted upright in the ground as shown where a substantial portion of the casing 12 is buried for connection to the underground water supply and where the portion of the casing 12 which houses the reservoir chamber 34 is below the frost line. Since the depth of the frost line may vary in different geographical locations, it. will be understood that the length of casing 12 will be fabricated accordingly. The nozzle 58 is preferably approximately 2 feet above the ground level although this may, of course, be varied.

Referring first to FIGS. 1 and 2, hydrant 10 is shown in the on position for delivery of water through standpipe 78 and out of nozzle 58. Here, bail 102 of handle unit 16 is moved upwardly across the head section 60 whereby crank arms 104 move to their lowermost position relative to links 108 causing sleeve 62 to slide downwardly on casing 12 and at the same time, moving the standpipe 78 downwardly into engagement with valve 52 to unseat it from seat-50 and open flow communication from passageway 32 through standpipe 78 into chamber of the head section 60. Such water flow under pressure opens valve 74 into chamber 68 so that flow enters passageway 66 out of nozzle 58. In the downward movement of standpipe 78, the arrangement of fitting 88 with the cup washers 92 (or the O-ring embodiment 98 in FIG. 6) acts as a plunger head against any collected water in area 34 and further effects of this will be explained after the following reference to the off position of hydrant 10 shown in FIGS. 3 and 4.

By the movement of bail 102 from the position in FIGS. 1 and 2 to the position. in FIGS. 3 and 4, the direction of movement of sleeve 62 and standpipe 78 is reversed or upwardly which simultaneously retracts standpipe 78 from engagement with valve 52 so that such valve closes under its spring pressure and the size or area of reservoir chamber 34 is enlarged by the upwardly movement of washers with standpipe 78 as shown in FIG. 4. As this occurs, valve 74 in head section chamber 68, being free of water pressure, automatically closes and water in standpipe 78 will drain down such pipe for collection and storage in the enlarged reservoir area 34. Such drainage is expedited by air intake under atmospheric pressure through the air check valve 86 which is otherwise held closed by water pressure through chamber 70 when valve 52 is open.

The air check valve 76 into head chamber 68 functions similarly to check valve 86 when hydrant 10 is closed and is designed particularly to assure drainage of nozzle 58 if a length of hose (not shown) should at times be left attached to nozzle 58 as frequently occurs. Without any such attached hose, nozzle 58 will easily drain when the hydrant is closed but experience has shown this does not always properly occur with a hose attached and thus valve 76 is provided to assure proper drainage when required.

With the reservoir chamber 34 storing water from standpipe 78 as described in the off position shown in FIG. 4, the reduction in size of reservoir area 34 by the downward movement of cup washers 90 (or plate 94 and O-ring 96) (FIGS. 2 and 6) as the on position of the hydrant is effected, results in the stored water being moved into the standpipe 78 through holes 84 where it is co-mingled with the new supply and can thereby be fully used without any waste or exposure to any contaminating source from outside of the casing 12. By this arrangement, it will be appreciated that hydrant functions adequately without the traditional drain hole, is completely sealed from the surrounding terrain and that the stored standpipe water is held below the frost line where it is safe from freezing and is available for future use.

With reference now more particularly to FIGS. 2 and 5, it will be noted that in the illustrated position of the hydrant 10, the lugs 100 on the disc key 98 are nested in the notches 38 at the upper end of cylinder 36. Thus, by disconnecting the links 108 from bail 102, assembly 14 can be rotated counterclockwise for the following purpose. Such rotation rotates standpipe 78 about its longitudinal axis whereby lugs 100 rotate cylinder 36 that is secured to valve housing 40 and disengages such housing from the external threads 26 on plug 24. Accordingly, with housing 40 turned free of plug 24, the standpipe 78, cylinder 36 and housing 40 together with valve 52 can be quickly and easily withdrawn as a unit for repairs or maintenance. Such parts are reinserted in the reverse order of their removal. Thus, in view of all of the foregoing, it is thought a full understanding of the construction and operation of this invention will be had and the advantages of the same will be appreciated.

We claim:

1. A yard hydrant, comprising:

a casing having an upper and lower end,

a valve housing with a spring loaded valve means therein in fluid seal contact with the lower end of said casing,

a fitting means secured to the lower end of said casing and adapted for flow communication with the source of fluid under pressure,

said fitting means having an orifice plug with an externally threaded neck extended into the lower end of said casing,

said valve housing being removably threadably attached to said threaded neck,

a head section including an integral nozzle,

means for arranging said head section relative to the upper end of said casing for vertical reciprocation and rotation relative thereto,

a standpipe within said casing having one end secured to said head section in flow communication therewith and being vertically reciprocal with corresponding movement of said head section,

a cylinder having an upper and lower end and arranged in the lower end of said casing,

means for securing the lower end of said cylinder in fluid seal contact with said valve housing,

said other end of said standpipe being disposed axially within said cylinder and vertically reciprocal relative thereto, fluid seal means on said standpipe being operable relative to said cylinder whereby a fluid reservoir is defined at the bottom by said valve housing, at the top by said fluid seal means and for the reservoir wall component by said cylinder, the downwardly movement of said standpipe and fluid seal means thereon effecting the reduction in size of said reservoir and with said other end of said standpipe acting against said valve means to open fluid flow through said hydrant, the upwardly movement of said standpipe and fluid seal means thereon elevating said standpipe from contact with said valve means permitting it to close and simultaneously enlarging said reservoir whereby fluid in said standpipe upon closing of said valve means drains therefrom into said reservoir for storage, the upper end of said cylinder being provided with a notch, and a lug key secured to said standpipe at a point thereon whereby in a downwardly movement of said standpipe said lug key is engaged in said notch so that an assembly comprising said head section, standpipe, cylinder and valve housing with valve means can be manually rotated to remove said valve housing from said fitting means to permit withdrawal from said casing as a unit said assembly for purposes of repair or maintenance. 2. A yard hydrant as defined in claim 1 where said fluid seal means comprises:

a cup washer, and means operatively attaching said cup washer to said standpipe. 3. A yard hydrant as defined in claim 1 wherein said fluid seal means comprises:

a disc plate journalled on said standpipe, and an O-ring arranged on the periphery of said plate. 4. A yard hydrant as defined in claim 1 including said standpipe being provided at its lower end with a lateral opening whereby with fluid stored in said reservoir while said valve means is closed, the movement of said standpipe for opening said valve means and simultaneously reducing the size of said reservoir cause the stored fluid to enter said standpipe through said lateral opening for reuse and commingling with fluid from the supply source for passage out of said nozzle.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US100255 *Mar 1, 1870 Improvement in hydrants
US609805 *Sep 29, 1897Aug 30, 1898 hardy
US3017896 *May 11, 1959Jan 23, 1962Frank C PapacekSanitary frostproof hydrant
US3523549 *Feb 8, 1968Aug 11, 1970Anderson Noel MYard hydrant valve
US3770000 *Dec 23, 1968Nov 6, 1973Murdock IncSanitary frostproof hydrant
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4096877 *May 17, 1976Jun 27, 1978Arledge Ii E RFreezeproof sanitary water supply appliance
US4971097 *Sep 29, 1989Nov 20, 1990Amtrol Inc.Freeze-proof hydrant
US5012833 *Jun 11, 1990May 7, 1991Amtrol Inc.Freeze-proof hydrant
US5261441 *May 10, 1993Nov 16, 1993Merrill Manufacturing Company, Inc.Yard hydrant
US6047723 *Mar 3, 1998Apr 11, 2000Hoeptner, Iii; Herbert W.Positive displacement yard hydrant
US6899120May 7, 2004May 31, 2005Baker Manufacturing CompanyYard hydrant
US7059337 *Aug 3, 2004Jun 13, 2006Wcm Industries, Inc.Fluid hydrant
US20060027265 *Aug 3, 2004Feb 9, 2006Ball William T JrFluid hydrant
Classifications
U.S. Classification137/281, 137/287, 137/283, 137/327
International ClassificationE03B9/04
Cooperative ClassificationE03B9/04
European ClassificationE03B9/04