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Publication numberUS3926231 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 16, 1975
Filing dateMar 15, 1973
Priority dateOct 1, 1970
Publication numberUS 3926231 A, US 3926231A, US-A-3926231, US3926231 A, US3926231A
InventorsStephen C Lemon, Michael J Madden, Robert L Murray, Paul R Ostand
Original AssigneeDover Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
System for loading liquid into a container or the like
US 3926231 A
Abstract
This disclosure relates to a system whereby liquid is supplied to a container from a supply line only when a vapor seal is formed between the supply line and the container. Flow of liquid is automatically stopped when the liquid in the tank reaches a predetermined level, when the pressure in the tank exceeds a predetermined value, or when the vapor seal is broken. Vapor is removed from the container during filling thereof. When filling ceases or the supply line is no longer vapor sealed to the container, the vapor removal line is automatically blocked to prevent escape of vapors into the atmosphere.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Unite States Patent Madden et al.

[ Dec. 16, 1975 SYSTEM FOR LOADING LIQUID INTO A CONTAINER OR THE LIKE Inventors: Michael J. Madden, West Covina, Calif.; Robert L. Murray, Dayton,

Ky.; Stephen C. Lemon; Paul R. Ostand, both of Cincinnati, Ohio Assignee: Dover Corporation, New York, NY.

Filed: Mar. 15, 1973 Appl. No.: 341,381

Related U.S. Application Data Division of Ser. No. 77,361, Oct. 1, 1970, Pat. No. 3,753,453.

U.S. Cl. 141/192; 137/615; 141/59; l4l/387 Int. Cl. B65B 3/18; B67C 3/34 Field of Search 137/615; 141/39, 46, 52, 141/59, 95, 192229, 285-310, 346-352,

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 8/1957 Switzer 141/387 X 3.357.461 12/1967 Friendship 141/198 X 3,443,608 5/1969 Copping et al. 141/198 X 3.605.824 9/1971 Madden et al 141/192 X Primary ExaminerRichard E. Aegerter Assistant ExaminerFrederick R. Schmidt [57] ABSTRACT This disclosure relates to a system whereby liquid is supplied to a container from a supply line only when a vapor seal is formed between the supply line and the container. Flow of liquid is automatically stopped when the liquid in the tank reaches a predetermined level, when the pressure in the tank exceeds a predetermined value, or when the vapor seal is broken. Vapor is removed from the container during filling thereof. When filling ceases or the supply line is no longer vapor sealed to the container, the vapor removal line is automatically blocked to prevent escape of vapors into theatmosphere.

3 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures US. Patent FIG. 2

N on un F'lilliilllli Dec. 16, 1975 Sheet 1 of 3 FIG. 3

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FIG. 1

U.S. Patent Dec. 16, 1975 Sheet 2 of3 3,926,231

FIG. 4

FIG. 6

US. Patent Dec. 16, 1975 Sheet 3 of 3 3,926,231

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SYSTEM FOR LOADING LIQUID INTO A CONTAINER OR THE LIKE This is a division of application Ser. No. 77,361 filed Oct. 1, 1970, which is now issued as US. Pat. No. 3,753,453.

When filling a container such as a truck tank, for example, with gasoline from a storage tank, vapors from the gasoline will pollute the air. Additionally, the escape of the vapors from the truck tank results in loss of some of the gasoline.

The present invention satisfactorily solves the foregoing problems by providing a system in which no vapor from the gasoline supplied to the truck tank can escape into the atmosphere. Thus, there will be no pollution of the atmosphere from the gasoline when the system of the present invention is employed.

The present invention also receives the vapors from the gasoline being supplied to the tank. Thus, the vapor may be condensed to a liquid form to again be supplied to the tank. Accordingly, the present invention prevents economic loss to the supplier of the gasoline that has previously escaped into the atmosphere as a vapor.

When loading a liquid such as gasoline, for example, from a main storage tank to a truck tank, for example. it is desirable that all of the gasoline supplied from the main storage tank be received in the truck tank. Other wise, if some of the gasoline should remain in the supply line from the main storage tank after filling of the truck tank has been stopped, this gasoline would flow from the supply line upon disconnection of the supply line from the truck tank and be lost. Additionally, the vapors resulting from evaporation of this gasoline would pollute the air.

The present invention satisfactorily solves this problem by utilizing a control valve in the supply line to automatically stop the supply of gasoline from the main storage tank before there is any disconnection of the supply line from the truck tank. Therefore, there will be no loss of the gasoline or any pollution of the atmosphere due to gasoline within the supply line not reaching the truck tank when the loading system of the present invention is utilized.

Additionally, before the supply of the gasoline from the storage tank to the truck tank begins, it is necessary that there be a vapor seal between the supply line and the truck tank.

The present invention satisfactorily overcomes this problem by not allowing any gasoline to be, supplied past the valve in the supply line until a vapor seal exists at the connection of the supply line to the truck tank. The system of the present invention utilizes a unique fluid control system to sense when the vapor seal is formed at the connection.

When filling a truck tank, the pressure within the tank must not be allowed to exceed a safe value. Otherwise, the possibility of tank rupture exists.

The present invention, satisfactorily solves this prob lem by automatically stopping the flow of the gasoline to the truck tank when the pressure within the truck Another object of this invention is to provide a liquid loading system in whichfiow to a tank cannot begin until a vapor seal existsbetween the tank and the supply line.

A further object of this invention is to-provide a liquid loading systemthatprevents the pressurelin a tank being filled from exceeding a predetermined pressu re.

Still another object of this invention is to provide a liquid loading system. in which flow is automatically stopped when the level of the liquid within the tank being filled reaches a predetermined height.

Other objects, uses, and advantages of this invention are apparent upon a reading of this description, which proceeds with reference to the drawings forming part thereof and wherein:

FIG. 1 is a side elevational view of the loading system of the present invention,

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of the system of FIG. 1.

.FIG. 3 is an end view of the system of FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 is an enlarged sectional view of a portion of the loading system of FIG. 1. and taken substantially along line 4-4 of FIG. 5.

tank exceeds a predetermined pressure. This is accom- FIG. 5 is a top plan view of thestructure of FIG. 4 and taken substantially along line 55 of FIG. 4.

FIG. 6 is a side elevational view, partly in section, of the structure of FIG. 5 and taken substantially along line 6-'-6 of FIG. 5.

FIG. 7 is a side .elvational view, partly in section, of another portion of the structure of FIG. 5 and taken substantially along line 77 of FIG. 5.

FIG. 8 is a schematic diagram of a fluid control system used with the loading system of the present invention for regulating the supply of liquid.

Referring to the drawings and particularly FIG. 1, there is shown a main storage tank 10 for a liquid such as gasoline, for example. A pipe 11 extends from the tank 10,

A boom 12 has its lower end pivotally connected by a swivel 14 to the pipe 11. The bottom 12 includes a pipe 15, which communicates with the pipe 11 so that the liquid, which may be pressurized, for example, may flow from the pipe 11 into the pipe 15. It should be understood that gravity flow may be employed if the storage tank 10 is appropiately positioned.

The pipe 15 communicates with a pipe 16 through swivels 17 and 18. Thus, the pipe 16 may pivot about a horizontal axis 19 (see FIG. 1) and a vertical axis 20 (see FIG. 2). The pipe 16 has a valve 21 mounted therein to control the flow of liquid from the storage tank 10. The valve 21 is continuously biased to its closed position by a spring or the like. One suitable example of the valve 21 is a valve sold by OPW Division of Dover Corporation as model 417-K.

The pipe 16 is connected through a swivel 22 to a pipe 23. which has its flange 24 bolted to a flange 25 of a vapor recoveryassembly 26. The vapor recovery assembly 26 is pivotally mounted about a horizontal axis 27 due to the swivel 22.

The vapor recovery assembly 26 has a pipe (see FIG. 4) secured to the flange 25 and extending downwardly for disposition within a tank or container 29 that is to be filled with liquid from the'storage tank 10. Thus, the liquid is supplied through the pipes l1, l5, 16, 23, and 28 to the tank 29. I

The vapor recovery assembly 26 has a second pipe 30 mounted eccentrieally with respect to'the pipe 28 and adapted to be disposed within the tank 29' when the pipe 28 is disposed therein. The pipe 30 is utilized to 3 remove the vapor from the tank 29.

When the vapor recovery assembly 26 is inserted within the tank 29, a sealing collar 31, which is formed of a suitable resillient material such as synthetic rubber, for example, and slidably mounted on the pipe 30, is urged into engagement with a flange 32 on the vapor recovery assembly 26. The flange 32 is fixedly secured to the pipes-28 and 30 by suitable means such as welding, for example.

The collar 31 is moved into engagment with the flange 32 by the upper surface of a manhole 33 of the container or tank 29 when the vapor recovery assembly 26 is inserted therein. When the collar 31 is not engaged with the flange 32, it is held in spaced-relation:

40 extending between the check valve 37 and a cross.

piece 40', continuously urges the check valve 37 to block the passage to the pipe 36.

Accordingly, vapor passes through the pipe 36- and past the check valve 37-only when there is suffic'ie'nt pressure from the vapor to open the check valve 37. The force of the spring 39 is selected so that only about one p.s.i. is required-to open the check valve 37.

The pipe 36 communicates at its upper end with a pipe 41 (see FIGS. 1 and 2), The pipe 41 is connected through a swivel 42, a pipe 43, and a tee 44 to a pipe 45, which is vertically spaced from the pipe substantially parallel thereto. The pipe 45 communicates through a tee 46, a flexible hose 47, and a swivel 48 with a pipe 49 of the beam 12.

The pipe 45 is maintained in spaced and substantially parallel relation to the pipe 16 by a'link 50, which is connected to a clamp 51 on the pipe 45 and a clamp 52 on the pipe 16. Thus, the pipes 45 and 16 are connected to each other for movement together in spaced relation to each other.

The pipe 49 of the boom 12 is mounted in spaced relation to the pipe of theboom 12 by a support 53. The pipe 49 communicates with a pipe 54 of the boom 12. The pipe 54 has its lower end 55 supported on the pipe 15 but blocked from communication 'with the pipe 15. The lower end 55 of the pipe 54 is sealed by being welded to the pipe 15. Thus, the vapor, which is flowing through the pipe 49, can only flow upwardly through the pipe 54.

The pipe 54 communicates at its upper end with a substantially vertical pipe 56, which has its lower end 57 supported on the pipe 15 of the boom 12. The lower end 57 of the pipe 56 does not communicate with the pipe 15. The lower end 57 of the pipe 56 is sealed by welding to the pipe 15.

It should be understood that a sealing member could be disposed in the pipe 56 adjacent the junction with the pipe 54 to prevent any vapor from passing downwardly within the pipe 56. Likewise, the portion of the pipe 54 beneath the pipe 49 also could have a sealing member thereon so that vapor would not flow toward the closed lower end 55 of the pipe 54.

The pipe 56 is connected through a swivel 57' to a pipe 58, which may communicate with a condenser, for

4 example. The vapor is condensed to a liquid in the condenser and returned to the storage tank 10.

The boom 12 includes the pipe 15, the pipe 49, the pipe 54, and the pipe 56. Since the boom 12 is mounted at its lower end through the swivel l4 and at its upper end through the swivel 57, the boom 12 may be rotated about the vertical axis of the pipe 56 to position the vapor recovery assembly 26 adjacent to the manhole 33 of the tank 29.

A handle 58a is fixedly mounted on the flange 32 of the vapor recovery assembly 26 to permit grasping of the apparatus of the present invention to cause rotation thereof about the vertical axis of the pipe 56. A second handle 59 is secured to the vapor return pipe 43 to aid the operator in moving the apparatus about the vertical axis of the pipe 56. Thus, by grasping the handles 58a and 59, the operator may position the vapor recovery assembly 26 adjacent the manhole 33 of the tank 29.

The vapor recovery assembly 26 is moved adjacent the manhole 33 of the tank 29 about the horizontal axis 19 under control of a fluid cylinder 60. One end of the cylinder 60 is pivotally connected by a pin 61 to a control housing 62. The control housing 62 is fixed to a swivel body 63, which connects the swivels 17 and 18 to each other.

Thus, when the cylinder 60 has its piston rod 64, which is connected to the clamp 52 of the pipe 16, retracted, the pipe 16 rotates clockwise about the horizontal axis 19. Because the pipe 45 is connected through the link 50 to the pipe 16 and the vapor recovery assembly 26 is connected to both of the pipes 16 and 45, the vapor recovery assembly 26 is moved downwardly and to the left (as viewed in FIG. 1) when the pipe 16 is rotated clockwise about the axis 19. This disposes the vapor recovery assembly 26 adjacent the manhole 33 of the tank 29. The handles 58a and 59 are employed by the operator to maintain the vapor recovery assembly 26 in a substantially vertical position by rotating it about the horizontal axes 27 and 42' as the pipe 16 is rotated about the horizontal axis 19. This results in the vapor recovery assembly 26 being substantially vertically aligned to enter the manhole 33 of the tank 29.

The fluid cylinder 60, which is preferably an air cylinder, is controlled by a fluid system that also controls a fluid cylinder 65. The fluid cylinder 65 has its piston rod 66 connected through a yoke 67 and an arm 68 to the valve 21, which controls flow of liquid through the pipe 16. Thus, when the piston rod 66 is extended from the cylinder 65, the valve 21 is opened.

The operation of the cylinder 60 is controlled through positioning a handle 69 (see FIGS. 1 and 3) of a control valve 70 (see FIG. 8), which is mounted within a housing 71 (see FIGS. 1 and 3.). The housing 71 is supported by the handle 58a so that the housing 71 is fixedly mounted on the vapor recovery assembly 26. One suitable example of the control valve 70 is sold as model 900l-M by Barksdale Valve.

The operation of the cylinder 65, which controls the valve 21, is automatically controlled in response to signals from a pneumatic eye 72 (see FIGS. 4 and 8). One suitable example of the pneumatic eye 72 is sold as model No. 14244 by Moore Products Company, Springhouse, Pennsylvania. As shown in FIG. 4, the pneumatic eye 72 is supported on a rod 72a, which is carried by the inner surface of the pipe 30 by being welded thereto. Thus, the pneumatic eye 72 is disposed within the pipe 30.

An inlet port 73 (see FIG. 8) of the control valve 70 is connected to a source 74 of pressurized air by a filter 75, a regulator 76, a line lubricator 77, and a line 78. The control valve 70 also has an exhaust port 79, a port 80, which has line 81 extending therefrom, and a port 82, which has a line 83 extending therefrom.

When the handle 69 is in its neutral position, the control valve 70 has the ports 73, 79, 80 and 82 blocked as shown in FIG. 8. When the handle 69 is moved to cause the cylinder 60 to retract its piston rod 64, the control valve 70 has its upper block of FIG. 8 moved downwardly whereby the port 73 communicates with the port 80 and the port 82 communicates with the port 79. In this position, pressurized air flows through the line 81 and past a control valve 84 into the cylinder 60 while air is exhausted from the cylinder 60 through a control valve 85 and the line 83.

The control valve 84 includes a check valve 86 and a variable restrictor valve 87 in parallel with the check valve 86. Similarly, the control valve 85 includes a check valve 88 and a variable restrictor valve 89 in parallel with the check valve 88. One suitable example of the valves 87 and 89 is a speed control valve sold by Pnoutrol Auto-Ponents.

When the pressurized air is supplied through the line 81, it passes through the check valve 86 of the control valve 84 while the air exhausts from the cylinder 60 through the variable restrictor valve 89 of the control valve 85 since the check valve 88 prevents flow in this direction. By appropriately regulating the flow through the variable restrictor valve 89, the rate or retraction of the piston rod 64 of the cylinder 60 may be controlled. Thus, the rate at which the vapor recovery assembly 26 is moved toward the manhole 33 of the tank 29 may be regulated.

When it is desired to return the vapor reecovery assembly 26 to the position shown in FIG. 1, the handle 69 of the control valve 70 is positioned to move the lower block of the control valve 70 of FIG. 8 into the intermediate position. As a result, the supply line 78 communicates with the line 83 while the exhaust port 79 communicates with the line 81. Accordingly, pressurized air is supplied through the check valve 88 of the control valve 85 to the cylinder 60 to extend the piston rod 64 from the cylinder 60. The rate at which the piston rod 64 is extended from the cylinder 60 is determined by the variable restrictor valve 87 of the control valve 84 since the check valve 86 prevents flow therethrough from the cylinder 60 to the port 80.

Accordingly, the handle 69 of the control valve 70 determines the connections between the ports 73, 79, 80, and 82 of the control valve 70. Thus, the handle 69 regulates whether there is retraction or extension of the piston rod 64 with respect to the cylinder 60.

When air under pressure is supplied through the line 81 due to the upper block of the control valve 70 being in the central position to provide communication between the ports 73 and 80, pressurized air also is supplied to a line 90, which connects with the line 81 at a junction 91. The line 90 has a pressure regulator 92 therein to reduce the pressure before the air passage through the line 92a to enter a fitting 93, which communicates with a dump valve 94 and a line 95.

As shown in FIG. 6, the valve 94 is mounted in the flange 32 and is open at its bottom end to communicate with the atmosphere unless the collar 31 has its flat portion 96 in engagement with the lower surface of the flange 32. When this occurs, the valve 94, which has its 6 open bottom end terminate in the lower surface of the flange 32, is closed. Thus, air cannot escape from the valve 94 when the flat portion 96 of the collar 31 is engaging the flange 32. This is when a vapor seal exists between the tank 29 and the vapor recovery assembly 26.

The line 95 is connected to a fitting 97 (see FIG. 7), which communicates with a dump valve 98 and a line 99. The valve 98 is mounted in the flange 32 of the vapor recovery assembly 26in the same manner as is the valve 94. Thus, the valve 98 has its open bottom end closed when the flat portion 96 of the collar 31 bears against the lower surface of the flange 32 due to the vapor recovery assembly 26 being in a vapor sealing arrangement with the tank 29.

As schematically disclosed in FIG. 8, the valves 94 and 98 are shown in an open position. This occurs when the flat portion 96 of the collar 3 l is not engaging against the lower surface of the flange 32.

As shown in FIG. 5, the fittings 93 and 97 for the valves 94 and 98 are substantially diametrically disposed to each other. Thus, this requires a good vapor seal between the collar 31 and the flange 32 before both of the valves 94 and 98 can be blocked or closed. This arrangemennt insures that a vapor seal exists between the vapor recovery-assembly 26 and the tank 29 before both of the valves 94 and 98 are closed.

The line 99 connects through a fitting 100 (see FIG. 7) on the flange 32 to a line 101, which is connected to the pneumatic eye 72. Thus, when the valves 94 and 98 are closed, the pressurized air from the line 90 is supplied through the regulator 92 and the line 92a to the line 101.

As shown in FIG. 4, the pneumatic eye 72 has a gap 102 formed therein and across which the air from the line 101 is directed toward a venturi 103 (see FIG. 8) in the pneumatic eye 72. The pipe 30 has openings or windows 104 (see FIG. 4) formed therein for access to the pneumatic eye and for vapor removal so the tank may be completely filled. The liquid in the tank 29 enters the pipe 30 through its open terminal end and through openings 104. When the level of the liquid in the tank 29 exceeds the level of the bottom of the gap 102, the flow of the air from'the'line 101 to the venturi 103 is obstructed. As a result, the venturi 103 will not receive sufficient air from the line 101 when the level of the liquid in the tank 29 obstructs the flow of the air through the gap 102.

As shown in FIG. 8, the venturi 103 communicates with a pilot control valve 105th'rough a line 106. The line 106 communicates with a diaphragm 107 of the pilot control valve 105. One suitable example of the pilot control valve 105 is a fluidic interface valve, which is sold as model XF32023 by Automatic Switch Company.

The pilot control valve 105 has an inlet port 108, which is connected by a line 109 to the line 90. Thus, the air within the line 90 is communicated through the port 108 by the line 109. Accordingly, pressurized air is supplied to the port 108 of the pilot control valve 105 when the line 90 has pressurized air therein.

The pilot control valve 105 has a port 110 communi- I eating with a line 111, which connects with a port 1 12 of a quick exhaust valve 113. One suitable example of the quick exhaust valve 113 is a valve sold as model No. l by Mead.

The quick exhaust valve 113 controls the flow of fluid to the cylinder 65, which regulates the position of 7 the valve 21 in the line 16. It is necessary for pressurized air to be supplied through the port 112 of the quick exhaust valve 1 13 and a port 114 of the valve 113 to move the piston rod 66 and cause opening of the valve 21 whereby the gasoline may be supplied to the tank 29 from the storage tank 10.

When there is no air flow through the venturi 103, the control member of the control valve 105 is positioned so that the port 110 communicates with an exhaust port 1 of the pilot control valve 105 while the port 108 is blocked. Thus, there can be no actuation of the yclinder 65 unless there is fluid flow through the venturi 103 of the pneumatic eye 72.

As previously mentioned, it is necessary for the control valve 70 to be properly positioned by the handle 69 so that there is pressurized air in the line 81 in order for there to be air pressure in the line 90. However, even if there is pressurized air within the line 90, the pilot control valve 105 is not actuated unless the valves 94 and 98 are closed. This occurs only when the vapor recovery assembly 26 is vapor sealed to the tank 29. This insures that there can be no actuation of the valve 21 to allow supply of gasoline to the tank 29 until a vapor seal exists between the tank 29 and the vapor assembly 26.

When the vapor seal exists between the vapor recovery assembly 26 and the tank 29, the air from the line 101 flows through the gap 102 into the venturi 103 provided that the gap 102 is not blocked by the level of the liquid in the tank 29. Thus, this insures that there can be no supply of the liquid to the tank 29 when the tank 29 is filled to a predetermined level.

However, if the tank 29 is not filled to the level at which the gap 102 is blocked, the flow of the air through the line 101 into the venturi 103 results in the pilot control valve 105 being actuated so that the lower block of the pilot control valve 105 of FIG. 8 moves up wardly whereby the part 108 communicates with the port 110 while the exhaust port 115 is blocked. When this occurs, pressurized air flows from the line 109 to the line 11 1. This results in the quick exhaust valve 113 being positioned as shown in FIG. 8 so that air flows directly from the port 112 to the port 114 to extend the piston rod 66 from the cylinder 65 to open the valve 21.

When flow through the venturi 103 ceases for any reason, the pilot control valve 105 returns to the position in which the port 110 communicates with the exhaust port 1 15 and the port 108 is blocked. As a result, the quick exhaust valve 113 has its right block of FIG. 8 moved to the left so that the port 114 communicates with an exhaust port 1 16 of the quick exhaust valve 1 13 and the port 112 is blocked. This arrangement of moving the control member of the quick exhaust valve 113 so that the port 114 communicates with the exhaust port 116 permits quick exhaust of the air from within the cylinder 65. The force of the spring, which acts on the valve 21, aids in removing the air from the cylinder 65. Thus, the valve 21 is rapidly closed whenever the pilot control valve 105 is inactivated due to air not flowing through the venturi 103.

Air flow through the venturi 103 is stopped whenever the flat portion 96 of the collar 31 ceases to engage the bottom surface of the flange 32. This results in one or both of the valves 94 and 98 communicating with the atmosphere so that the pressurized air or fluid from the regulator 92 is vented through the valves 94 and 98 and not supplied to the gap 102 of the pneumatic eye 72. The vapor seal between the collar 31 and the flange 32 8 is broken whenever the pressure within the tank 29 is sufficient to lift the vapor recovery assembly 26 partially out of the manhole 33. As a result, the flat portion 96 ceases to engage the lower surface of the flange 32.

The flow of pressurized air through the venturi 103 also ceases whenever the handle 69 of the control valve is manually actuated to move the control member of the control valve 70 from the position in which the ports 73 and communicate with each other. When this occurs, there is no longer any pressurized air supplied through the line 90.

Likewise, when the level of the liquid within the tank 29 reaches the height at which it blockes the gap 102, the pilot control valve is positioned to stop supply of air to the cylinder 65. Thus, this also closes the valve 21. Therefore, the valve 21 stops flow of liquid to the tank 29 whenever a predetermined pressure or a predetermined level exists within the tank 29. Furthermore, the valve 21 cannot be opened until a vapor seal exists between the vapor recovery assembly 26 and the tank 29.

Since any pressure build-up within the tank 29 would be sensed by the venturi 103 because of the communication of the venturi 103 with the tank 29, it is necessary to compensate for this build-up of pressure within the tank 29. Accordingly, a line 117 (see FIG. 7) is disposed within the pipe 30 and has its lower and communicating with the tank 29 so as to be exposed to the pressure within the tank 29. The line 117 passes through the flange 32 (see FIG. 7) and then to the opposite side of the diaphragm 107 from that connected to the line 106.

In the schematic of FIG. 8, the line 117 is shown fed into the opposite side of the pilot control valve 105 from the diaphragm 107. However, it actually is supplied to the opposite side of the diaphragm 107 to balance the pressure, which is sensed in the venturi 103 due to the pressure build-up within the tank 29. Accordingly, the build-up of pressure within the tank 29 has no effect on the operation of the pilot control valve 105 due to the line 117.

It should be understood that the pilot operated valve 105, the regulator 92, the filter 75, the regulator 76, and the line lubricator 77 are disposed within the control housing 62. With the pneumatic eye 72 disposed within the vapor recovery assembly 26 and the control valve 70 disposed within the housing 71, it is necessary for the lines 78, 81, 83, 92a, 106, and 117 to extend from the control housing 62 to the housing 71 and for the lines 92a, 106 and 117 to extend from the housing 71 to the vapor recovery assembly 26.

Accordingly, the lines 78, 81, 83, 92a, 106, and l 17 are mounted within a flexible tubular member 1 18, which extends from the upper end of the control housing 62. The flexible tubular member 118 passes through the tee 46 into the pipe 45. A hollow cylindrical member 119 surrounds the tubular member 118 within the pipe 45 to seal the flexible tubular member 118 from the vapor flowing through the pipe 45.

The flexible tubular member 118 exits from the tee 44 and is supported by the handle 59 through which it passes. The flexible tubular member 118 then enters the housing 71 and terminates therein.

The lines 106 and 101, which are connected to the pnuematic eye 72, and the line 92a, which is connected to the associated valves 94 and 98, extend separately from the housing 71. Thus, as shown in FIG. 6, the line 92a connects with the fitting 93, which connects directly to the valve 94 and through the line 95* and the fitting 97 to the valve 98. The line 117 extends through a fitting 120 (see FIGS. and 7) and then through the flange 32 of the vapor recovery assembly v26 as shown in FIG. 6. The line 106 extends through a fitting 106a (see FIGS. 5 and 6) and then through the flange-32 for, communication with the venturi 103 in the pneumatic eye72.

Considering the operation of the present invention, the tank 29 of a movable vehicle such as a truck will be disposed adjacent the vapor recovery assembly 26 of the loading system of the present invention. Then, the handles 58a and 59 will be grasped to causerotation of the apparatus about the vertical axis of the pipe56.

When the vapor recovery assembly 26 is disposed near the manhole 33 in the tank 29, the handle 69 0f the control valve 70 is actuated to supply air from the line 70 through the line 81 to retract the piston rod 64 into the cylinder 60. This causes clockwise pivoting of the pipe 16 about the horizontal axis 19.

As the pipe 16 pivots clockwise, it is necessary to maintain the vapor recovery assembly 26 in a substantially vertical position. This is accomplished by manipulation of the handles 58a and 59 to cause pivoting of the vapor recovery assembly 26 about the horizontal axis 27.

When the vapor recovery assembly 26 enters the manhole 33, the downward movement of the vapor recovery assembly 26 results in the collar 31 engaging the manhole 33 of the tank 29. When this occurs, the continued downward movement of the vapor recovery as ducted to a condenser, for example, where it is converted to liquid and returned to the storage tank 10.

The amount of fluid supplied to the tank 29 from the main storage tank 10 may be controlled by a meter. However, if the meter should not function accurately or if there should have been liquid in the tank 29 that was not accounted for, the tank 29 may fill before the meter stops the flow of the liquid from the main storage tank .10. When this occurs, the gap 102 is blocked by the liquid flowing into the pipe 30. As a result, the pilot control valve 105 is moved to disconnect the ports 108 and 110 from each other whereby the flow of pressurized airto the cylinder 65 is stopped so that the valve 21 automatically and rapidly returns to its closed position to stop the flow of gasoline through the pipe 16.

If the pressure within the tank 29 should become excessive during filling, the vapor recovery assembly 26 would be lifted. As a result, the seal between the flat portion 96 of the collar 31 and the lower surface of the flange 32' would cease to exist. This would open the valves 94 and 98 to stop the flow of air through the venturi 103.-This would cause the pilot operated valve 105 sembly 26 causes the lower surface of the flange 32 to engage the flat portion 96 of the collar 31 to form a vapor seal between the collar 31 and the manhole 33 of the tank 29. Until there is sufficient down pressure on the collar 31, exerted due to pressurization of the cylinder 60 through the line 81, the flat portion 96 does not seal or close the ports of the dump valves 94 and 98 in the flange 32. 1

Accordingly, until there is a vapor seal between the manhole 33 of the tank 29 and the collar 31 'of the vapor recovery assembly 26, the valves 94 and 98 have their ports open. As a result, the pilot control valve 105 is not receiving any signal from the pneumatic eye 72 because no air is flowing through the venturi 103. Thus, there can be no actuation of the cylinder 65 to open the valve 21 at this time.

However, as soon as a vapor seal exists between the vapor recovery assembly 26 and the tank 29, the valves 94 and 98 have their ports closed by the flat portion 96 of the collar 31. This results in the pressurized air in the line 90 being supplied through the line 101 to flow through the gap 102 into the venturi 103 as seen in FIG. 8. As a result, as soon as the vapor seal exists between the vapor recovery assembly 26 and the tank 29, the pilot control valve 105 is positioned to connect the line 109 with the line 1 11 whereby the piston rod 66 is extended from the cylinder 65 to open the valve 21 in the pipe 16 to allow liquid to be supplied to the tank 29. With the vapor seal formed between the tank 29 and the vapor recovery assembly 26, the vapor within the tank 29 escapes through the pipe 30. Whenever the pressure of the vapor exceeds a predetermined value, which is preferably one p.s.i., the check valve 37 opens to allow the vapor to pass through the pipe 41, the swivel 42, the pipe 43, the tee 44, the pipe 45, the tee 46, the hose 47, the swivel 48, and the pipes 49, 54, and 56 to the pipe 58. From the pipe 58, the vapor is conto be positioned as shown in FIG. 8 to stop the flow of pressurized air to-the cylinder 65. This would result in the valve 21 again closing due to its spring.

When the filling of the tank 29 has been completed by the meter stopping flow of the liquid from the storage tank 10, theoperator positions the handle 69 of the control valve 70 so that the lower block of FIG. 8 of the control valve 70 is moved upwardly to connect the inlet port 73 with the port 82 and the port with the exhaust port 79. This automatically removes the pressurized air from the line and. causes immediate closing of the valve 21. After the valve 21 closes this results in the piston rod 64 being extended from the cylinder 60 to return the pipe 16 to its uppermost position by rotating the pipe 16 counterclockwise about the horizontal axis 19.

This sequence of operation is due to the combined action of the quick exhaust valve 113 and the control valve 84. Thus, it is seen that the valve 21 closes before the assembly 26 moves upward out of communicaion with the opening 33 of the tank 29.

After the pipe 16 has been returned to its original rest position, the operator positions the handle 69 of the control valve 70 so that the inlet port 73, the exhaust port 79, and the ports 80 and 81 are all blocked in the manner shown in FIG. 8. Thus, no fluid is supplied to either the cylinder 60 or the cylinder 65. If an emergency shutdown of the system should be required, it is only necessary for the operator to move the handle 69 of the valve 70 to the position in which the lower block of the valve 70 in FIG. 8 is disposed in the central portion. This results in communication of the inlet port 73 with the port 82 and the port 80 with the exhaust port 79. This automatically closes the valve 21 since there is no air pressure in the line 90. It also then causes removal of the vapor recovery assembly 26 from the manhole 33 of the tank 29.

While the present invention has been described as supplying gasoline to a tank, it should be understood that it may be utilized for the control of any liquid. While the present invention has utilized a pneumatic system, it should be understood that other types of systems both fluid and electrical may be employed as long as its is compatible with the liquid being supplied.

An advantage of this invention is that it automatic ally starts liquid flow only when there is a vapor tight con- 1 1 nection with the container or tank being loaded. Another advantage of this invention is that it automatically stops flow when a vapor tight connection ceases to exist between the tank and the supply line. A further advantage of this invention is that it prevents escape of 5 a liquid from either a tank, which is being loaded, or a source from which the liquid is being supplied. Still another advantage of this invention is that it automatically shuts off the supply of liquid if the tank pressure exceeds a predetermined value. A still further advantage of this invention is that it automatically stops flows of the liquid when the tank is filled. Yet another advantage of this invention is that it automatically closes the vapor receiving line when the device is removed from the tank being filled. A yet further advantage of this invention is that there is no spillage of the liquid being supplied to the tank.

For purposes of exemplification, a particular embodiment of the invention has been shown and described according to the best present understanding thereof. However, it will be apparent that changes and modifications in the arrangement and construction of the parts thereof may be resorted to without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

What is claimed is:

l. A fluiid handling system including a conduit for conducting a fluid therethrough to a container or the like, conduit valve means in said conduit to regulate flow therethrough, said valve means being normally biased closed, support means, means pivotally connecting said conduit to said support means, a conduit pivoting cylinder connected with said conduit to pivotsaid conduit about said pivotal connecting means to move said conduit into and out of communication with the container, means urging said conduit valve means to a closed position, cylinder means to move said conduit valve means to an open position, single control means to simultaneously produce actuation of said pivoting cylinder and said moving cylinder, and fluid flow circuit means connected with said cylinder means and said pivoting cylinder and said single control means, said circuit means being responsive to said single control means, pressurized fluid flow sensing means in said circuit means, said sensing means being operatively connected with said pivoting cylinder wherein pressurized fluid is supplied to said pivoting cylinder when fluid flow is sensed by said sensing means, said sensing means insuring that said conduit valve means is closed 12 by said urging means before said pivoting cylinder moves said conduit out of communication with the container.

2. The system according to claim 1 in which said pivoting cylinder includes a fluid acutated piston therein, said piston being pivotally connected with said conduit, said moving cylinder includes a fluid actuated piston therein, said moving cylinder piston being operatively connected with said conduit valve means, said circuit means including a fluid flow system in which fluid from a single pressurized fluid source is operatively connected to both of said cylinders, a controlling valve means, said single control means being operatively connected with said controlling valve means for controlling the flow of pressurized fluid from said source to each of said cylinders, said controlling valve means being responsive to said single control means, said controlling valve means having a no-flow through position and having a first flow position wherein pressurized fluid is directed to one end of said pivoting cylinder whereby said piston is urged to the opposite end of said cylinder thereby causing a pivoting in a first direction of said conduit, said valve first flow position permitting fluid to be directed to said moving cylinder and means responsive to said sensing means to release the pressure from said source to said moving cylinder when said controlling valve means of said single control means is moved to a second position to change the direction of fluid supply to said pivoting cylinder such that fluid is directed to the opposite end of said pivoting cylinder thereby terminating flow to said sensing means such that said moving cylinder is vented to atmosphere whereby said urging means returns said conduit valve means in said conduit to its closed position before pivoting in a second direction of said conduit occurs.

3. The system according to claim 1 including a check valve and variable restriction in parallel with said check valve in said circuit means between said controlling valve means and each end of said pivoting cylinder, said variable restriction retarding the flow of fluid from said cylinder of said pivoting means when the direction of supply of fluid to said cylinder of said pivoting means is changed by movement of said controlling valve means from one to the other of said first and second positions thereby controlling the rate of movement of said pivot cylinder piston.

Patent Citations
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US2803269 *Mar 15, 1955Aug 20, 1957Union Oil CoLiquid dispensing and vapor recovery system
US3357461 *Sep 30, 1965Dec 12, 1967Meyer Geo J Mfg CoAutomatic container filling control method and apparatus
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US3605824 *Sep 20, 1968Sep 20, 1971Dover CorpMethod and system for loading liquid into a container or the like
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4074734 *Jul 20, 1976Feb 21, 1978Union Oil Company Of CaliforniaLiquid delivery system
US4202372 *Dec 1, 1976May 13, 1980Fmc CorporationArticulated fluid conduit with auxiliary support
US4649969 *Nov 22, 1985Mar 17, 1987Dover CorporationLiquid dispensing nozzle having a sealing arrangement for vapor return means
US5184654 *Jun 18, 1991Feb 9, 1993Dover CorporationVapor recovery sealing devices
US5333653 *Jun 23, 1993Aug 2, 1994Dover CorporationInflatable manhole sealing device
US5435335 *Jun 17, 1994Jul 25, 1995Ebw, Inc.Overflow valve
US5782461 *Dec 19, 1996Jul 21, 1998Lord CorporationSnubber using bulk loading
US6945286Jun 30, 2003Sep 20, 2005Economy Controls CorporationClosed loop fluid transfer system for liquid supply and vapor recovery
Classifications
U.S. Classification141/192, 137/615, 141/59, 141/387
International ClassificationB67D7/04, B67D7/00
Cooperative ClassificationB67D7/002, B67D7/005, B67D7/0478
European ClassificationB67D7/00C, B67D7/04C1, B67D7/00B