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Publication numberUS3927466 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 23, 1975
Filing dateFeb 28, 1974
Priority dateFeb 28, 1974
Publication numberUS 3927466 A, US 3927466A, US-A-3927466, US3927466 A, US3927466A
InventorsRosalsky Ivan
Original AssigneeAirlite Aluminum Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of making metal ball-bat
US 3927466 A
Abstract
An elongated hollow cylindrical tube of relatively light and malleable metallic material has one end closed as by swedging to form the ball-striking end of a ball-bat. The other end of the cylinder is attenuated and narrowed to define the handle end of the ball-bat and is then flared outwardly at the open end, the marginal edge thereof being fluted or plain. A cylindrical cup element is then secured onto said open end, the wall of cup being compressed radially inwardly about the flaring and locked thereabout against rotary or longitudinal movement with respect to the ball-bat.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 11 1 Rosalsky Dec. 23, 1975 METHOD OF MAKING METAL BALL-BAT [75] Inventor: Ivan Rosalsky, Montclair, NJ.

[73] Assignee: Airlite Aluminum Corporation, Keamy, NJ.

[22] Filed: Feb. 28, 1974 [21] Appl. No.: 446,933

52 us. Cl 29/511; 273/72 A [51] Int. Cl. B21!) 39/00; B23P 11/00 [58] Field of Search 29/511; 273/72 A, 72 R [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,499,128 6/1924 Shroyer .1 273/72 R 1,630,249 5/1927 Babbitt 29/511 UX 1,665,195 4/1928 Cohn 273/72 R 1,812,743 6/1931 Gagnon 29/511 X 10/1972 Merola 273/72 A 4/1974 Willis 273/72 A X I Primary ExaminerCharlie T. Moon Attorney, Agent, or Firm-William R. Liberman [57] ABSTRACT An elongated hollow cylindrical tube of relatively light and malleable metallic material has one end closed as by swedging to form the ball-striking end of a ball-bat. The other end of the cylinder is attenuated and narrowed to define the handle end of the ball-bat and is then flared outwardly at the open end, the marginal edge thereof being fluted or plain. A cylindrical cup element is then secured onto said open end, the wall of cup being compressed radially inwardly about the flaring and locked thereabout against rotary or longitudinal movement with respect to the ball-bat.

4 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures US. Patcent Dec. 23, 1975 3,927,466

METHOD OF MAKING METAL BALL-BAT FIELD on THE INVENTION DESCRIPTION OF THE PRIOR ART Metal ball-bats have long been known in the art with few if any'thereof achievingany measurable degree of acceptance. Among prior art disclosures on ball bats of metal are U.S. Pat. Nos to Moose 377,686 of Feb. 7, 1888; to Middlekauf 1,611,858, of Dec. 21, 192 6; Merola 3,479,030 of Jan. 26, 1967; Swenck 3,691,625 of Sept. 19, 1972; and Wilson 3,703,290 of Nov. 21, 1972. These prior art devices have numerous failings, related either to cost, difficulty of production, longevity in use, or are generally unsatisfactory in use with regard to ball striking reaction.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The method and product of the present invention has eliminated the drawbacks of prior art structures. The method, with the machinery developed to practice it, is relatively simple and uncomplicated. The body of the bat is formed from a hollow cylindrical tube of aluminum or an aluminum alloy, of strength and rigidity suitable for use in ball striking and driving. The upper end, or end adjacent the ball striking portion, is closed by friction forming the metal at said upper end. The cylinder, below the ball striking area, is swaged gradually radially to reduce the outer diameter thereof on a gradual taper to a section of reduced diameter thereby to define the hand-gripping portion. The opening at the handle end is flared outwardly and its border out of round to provide an undulating peripheral edge. Thereafter an open-mouthed cylindrical cap element is inverted over the flared end, the walls of the cap being crimped on a reverse tapering to interfit and interlock with the male section, and with the upper edge of the cap wall fitting into an annular channel or groove about the handle thereby to merge the cap walls into the body of the handle and to prevent movement of the cap circumferentially or longitudinally relative to the handle or hand-gripping end. The material used are of different hardnesses allowing metals to flow into one another.

The product of the present invention is thus a bat of metal which has a smooth, seamless surface from the striking end to the handle end, with the cap closing the handle end merging into the body of the handle to present a practically homogeneous body.

The object, therefore, of the present invention is to provide a ball-bat of a minimal number of components which can be assembled relatively easily and quickly into a permanent assembly, along with the method of forming said bat.

Another object of the present invention is the provision of a two-piece metal ball-bat, the pieces being interlocked against relative movement.

Still another object is to provide a metal ball-bat which will provide all the benefits of a unitary onepiece bat and which is formed simply and easily without brazing, welding, soldering or riveting.

I DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 isia side elevational view of a ball-bat constructed according to and embodying the present invention;

, FIG. 2 is a part elevation, part section, enlarged in relation to FIG 1, of the handle and cap end of said ball-bat.

FIG. 3 is a vertical section through the open handle end, during an intermediate stage of the process of formation of the bat of the present invention;

- FIG. 4 is a top plan of the flared opening at the handle end of the ball-bat showing the border fluting; and

FIG. 5 is a vertical section through the cap end of the ball-bat priorto its application to and securement on the bat.

DESCRIPTION OF A PREFERRED EMBODIMENT The ball-bat illustrated in the drawings annexed hereto, and forming a part hereof, is indicated generally by reference numeral 10 and comprises a ball striking portion 12 at one end of bat 10, a handle portion 14 at the other end, and an intermediate bridging portion 16. Bat 10 comprises an originally longitudinally extending hollow elongated cylinder of aluminum or of similar light, relatively malleable metal. The starting outside diameterv is that of the conventional ball-bat and its diameter is unchanged throughout the length of the ball striking portion 12. While described in relation to a bat used in playing baseball, it will be obvious from the foregoing and from the following description that other types of ball-bats may similarly be formed in accordance with the present invention.

The cylinder is then subjected to the action of swedging hammers, in the conventional manner, thereby gradually to reduce the diameter of the cylinder to define a bridge portion 16. Thereafter, the swedging is continued to reduce the remainder of the cylinder to the same thickness as the narrower end of the bridge portion 16 for length sufficient to define the handle portion 14. Handle 14 may be tape-wrapped or otherwise covered for easier handling. The free open end 18 of the cylinder at the handle end thereof is then flared outwardly on a suitable mandrel, and the border fluted as indicated by reference numeral 22 for reasons to be set forth hereinbelow. At the point where outward flaring 18 begins, an annular groove or channel 20 is provided. A cap portion of similar metallic material is formed, in the shape of an open-ended cup member 24 having an annular straight wall 28 tapering in thickness from bottom 26 to a reduced thickness edge, as at 30. The flared and fluted end 18 of bat 10 is then inserted into the open end of cap 24 and sides 18 and cup 24 compressed inwardly about the outwardly tapered end 16 to force the bat flutings into the metal of the cap and the metal of the cap into the valleys of the flutings.

Similarly, as the free ends of the cap sides are radially compressed and thickened, the material thereof is forced into annular groove or channel 20 so as to merge into the side of handle 14 and present a smooth, uninterrupted surface against the heel of the hand when the bat is being manipulated.

I claim:

1. The method of making a metal ball-bat which comprises deforming the metal at one end of a hollow cylinder to close off said end, reducing the diameter of the cylinder at the other and open end of said cylinder to extend the length thereof thereby to form a handle portion of uniform diameter, forming an annular peripheral recess in the handle spaced from the open end of the cylinder, applying an inverted side-walled cap of metal over the said other end and crimping the side walls of the cap against the open end of the cylinder and forcing the ends of the side walls into the recess to lock the cap against rotary and longitudinal movement with respect to the bat.

2. The method of claim 1 which includes the step reducing the diameter of the cylinder on a taper from the original diameter thereof to the handle end.

3. The method of making a metal ball-bat which comprises deforming the metal at one end of a hollow cylinder to close off said end, reducing the diameter of the cylinder at the other and open end of said cylinder to extend the length thereof to form a handle portion of uniform diameter, forming an annular peripheral recess in the handle spaced from the open-end of the cylinder, flaring the said open end outwardly and fluting the marginal border thereof, applying an inverted sidewalled cap of metal over the said other and open end and crimping the side walls of the cap against the open end of the cylinder and forcing the ends of the side walls of the cap into the recess to lock the cap against rotary and longitudinal movement with respect to the bat.

4. The method of claim 3, including the step of deforming the metal of the cap and of the fluted border of the handle end so that there is an interdigitation of cap and border metal preventing relative circumferential movement of the cap and handle.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1499128 *May 27, 1922Jun 24, 1924Shroyer Jr William ABaseball bat
US1630249 *Feb 3, 1927May 31, 1927J V PilcherGolf-club shaft
US1665195 *Jan 14, 1927Apr 3, 1928Edward CohnReenforced safety bat
US1812743 *Sep 11, 1928Jun 30, 1931Bead Chain Mfg CoTubular pin and method of making same
US3697069 *Nov 12, 1970Oct 10, 1972Amerola Prod CorpBall bat with eccentrically thickened walls
US3807213 *May 3, 1972Apr 30, 1974Aluminum Co Of AmericaMethod of making a hollow metal bat
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4000895 *Aug 18, 1975Jan 4, 1977Reynolds Metals CompanyBall bat
US4177989 *Nov 28, 1977Dec 11, 1979James D. Easton, Inc.Hollow bat and method of making
US4248425 *Apr 16, 1979Feb 3, 1981James D. Easton, Inc.Hollow bat and method of making
US4786004 *Apr 24, 1987Nov 22, 1988Micafil, Inc.Armature winding machine with removable shrouds
US5701998 *Jul 18, 1995Dec 30, 1997Perry; Eric J.Baseball bat covers
US7201683May 5, 2003Apr 10, 2007Roberto EstapeElastic grip handle for a baseball/softball bat
Classifications
U.S. Classification29/511, 473/566
International ClassificationA63B59/00, A63B59/06, B23P11/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63B59/06, B23P11/005
European ClassificationA63B59/06, B23P11/00A