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Publication numberUS3927766 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 23, 1975
Filing dateFeb 4, 1974
Priority dateFeb 7, 1973
Also published asCA1007182A1, DE2404668A1, DE2404668C2
Publication numberUS 3927766 A, US 3927766A, US-A-3927766, US3927766 A, US3927766A
InventorsDay Robert H
Original AssigneeIllinois Tool Works
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cups for holding ingredients for drinks
US 3927766 A
Abstract
A double-walled container consisting of an inner member secured within an outer member, each member being of seamless thin-wall plastics material and each member comprising a side wall and a bottom wall; the container including an upper sealing surface adjacent to the inner bottom wall and a lower sealing surface adjacent to the outer bottom wall, so placed that the respective sealing surfaces abut each other and make a seal when two such containers are nested, and thus isolate a space between the inner bottom wall of the lower of the nested containers and the outer bottom wall of the upper of the nested containers; a downwardly-facing holding surface on the interior of the inner side wall and an upwardly-facing holding surface on the exterior of the outer side wall, both above the mid-height of the side walls, and so placed that, when two such containers are nested, the respective holding surfaces overlap each other and thus hold the respective sealing surfaces together, and at the same time make a second seal; at least one of the holding surfaces being capable of resilient radial displacement in response to substantial axial forces on the containers, thus permitting intentional assembly and separation of the containers.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Day 1 1 CUPS FOR HOLDING INGREDIENTS FOR DRINKS [75] Inventor: Robert H. Day, Bracknell, England 3] Assignee: Illinois Tool Works Inc., Chicago,

1221 Filed: Feb. 4, 1974 [21] Appl. No.1 439,209

[30] Foreign Application Priority Data Feb. 7, 1973 United Kingdom 6057/73 [52] US. Cl 206/519; 206/217; 220/9 R [51] Int. Cl? B651) 21/02; B65D 85/72 [58] Field of Search 206/519, 520, 217; 229/l.5 B; 220/9 R [561 References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,137,039 4/1915 Weber 206/217 1,889,111 11/1932 Serr .1 206/217 3,186,850 6/1965 Anthony 206/217 3,372,830 3/1968 Edwards.... 220/9 R 3,485,412 12/1969 Hawley 229/15 B 3,512,677 5/1970 Kovac 229/15 B Dec. 23, 1975 Primary ExaminerGeorge E. Lowrance Attorney, Agent, or Firm-E. L. Benno; R W. Beart [57] ABSTRACT A double-walled container consisting of an inner member secured within an outer member, each member being of seamless thin-wall plastics material and each member comprising a side wall and a bottom wall; the container including an upper sealing surface adjacent to the inner bottom wall and a lower sealing surface adjacent to the outer bottom wall, so placed that the respective sealing surfaces abut each other and make a seal when two such containers are nested, and thus isolate a space between the inner bottom wall of the lower of the nested containers and the outer bottom wall of the upper of the nested containers; a

downwardly-facing holding surface on the interior of the inner side wall and an upwardly-facing holding surface on the exterior of the outer side wall, both above the mid-height of the side walls, and so placed that, when two such containers are nested, the respective holding surfaces overlap each other and thus hold the respective sealing surfaces together, and at the same time make a second seal; at least one of the holding surfaces being capable of resilient radial displacement in response to substantial axial forces on the containers, thus permitting intentional assembly and separation of the containers.

1 Claim, 2' Drawing Figures U.S., PHtfiIlt Dec. 23, 1975 Sheet 2 of2 CUPS FOR HOLDING INGREDIENTS FOR DRINKS There is a need for seamless thin-wall containers of plastics material, capable of nesting with an identical container, the container comprising a bottom wall, and a side wall extending generally upwards and outwards from the bottom wall, there being means serving to maintain and isolate a space between the bottom walls of the containers when the containers are nested.

When a stack of such containers is assembled, each space can be pre-loaded, e.g. with a freeze-dried drink concentrate.

According to this invention, such a container is double-walled, i.e. it consists of an inner member secured within an outer member, each member comprising a side wall and a bottom wall; and the container includes an upper sealing surface adjacent to the inner bottom wall and a lower sealing surface adjacent to the outer bottom wall, so placed that the respective sealing surfaces abut each other and make a seal when two such containers are nested, and thus isolate a space between the inner bottom wall of the lower of the nested containers and the outer bottom wall of the upper of the nested containers: a downwardly-facing holding surface on the interior of the inner side wall and an upwardly-facing holding surface on the exterior of the outer side wall, both above the mid-height of the side walls, and so placed that, when two such containers are nested, the respective holding surfaces overlap each other and thus hold the respective sealing surfaces together, and at the same time make a second seal; at least one of the holding surfaces being capable of resilient radial displacement in response to substantial axial forces on the containers, thus permitting intentional assembly and separation of the containers.

The invention will be explained in more detail with reference to an example shown in the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a fragmentary vertical section of one cup; and

FIG. 2 is a similar section of two cups nested.

The cup shown in the drawings consists of an inner member 2 and an outer member 4, each made of polystyrene, by plug-assist thermo-forming from sheet material. This process of manufacture aims to produce an approximately uniform thickness of 0.010 inch in each member. The size of the cup is 3 inch overall height, and 2.875 inch overall diameter at the top. The cup is designed so that, in a stack of cups, each one is 0.5 inch above the one below; this dimension is known as the stacking height.

Note that, in the drawings, all the thicknesses of material are exaggerated. Because of this, the upper cup in FIG. 2 has to be shown somewhat to the left of the lower cup. In practice, the upper cup would be directly above the lower cup, i.e. with the central vertical axis of the upper cup coinciding with that of the lower cup.

The inner member has a bottom wall 6, and a side wall which extends generally upwards and outwards from a junction 8 with the bottom wall to a beaded rim 10 defining an open top of the cup. The outer member 4 has a bottom wall 12 and a side wall which extends generally upwards and outwards to a beaded rim 14 which, after the inner member has been placed in position within the outer member, is enclosed by the rim 10, so that the two members are held together.

At the junction between the bottom wall 12 and the sidewall of the outer member, there is a lower sealing surface 16. At a distance above this corresponding to the stacking height, there is an upper sealing surface 18, forming part of the side wall of the inner member. When two cups are fully nested together, the sealing members engage one another as shown in FIG. 2. Each of the sealing surfaces is conical, with a semi-vertical angle of 30.

The middle part of the height of the side wall of the outer member takes the form of a series of steps, which constitute a finger-gripping portion 20.

Above this finger-gripping portion, the cup is formed with four rings, namely a first and second ring 22 and 24 on the inner member, and a third and fourth ring 26, and 28 on the outer member. In cross section, these are V-shaped, with the apex directed inwards, except that the lowermost ring 28 has no lower wall. When the cups are fully nested, as shown in FIG. 2, the first ring 22 of the lower cup interengages with the third ring 26 of the upper cup. The inner surface of the lower wall of the first ring constitutes an internal downwardly-facing upper holding surface. The outer surface of the lower wall of the third ring 26 constitutes an external upwardly-facing lower holding surface. These surfaces overlap each other when the cups are nested, and thus hold the cups together. The vertical distance from the first ring 22 to the operative part of the upper sealing surface 18 is slightly less than the vertical distance from the third ring 26 to the operative part of the lower sealing surface 16. Consequently, when the cups are moved into one another, into nested relation, the upper and lower sealing surfaces 18 and 16 make contact a little before the first ring 22 reaches engagement with the third ring 26 of the upper cup. The result of this is that axial and hoop stresses are set up in the side walls, which have the effect of holding the sealing surfaces 18 and 16 firmly in contact with each other, and possibly causing slight circumferential engagement of the upper surface 18 and circumferential contraction of the lower surface 16. However, the angle of the conical surfaces is such that, when subsequent separation is desired, no jamming has occurred between the sealing surfaces 18 and 16.

In the nested condition, the first ring 22 of the lower cup and the third ring 26 of the upper cup are in a slightly displaced and consequently stressed condition, having moved radially outwards and inwards respectively, from the as-moulded condition.

The rings 22 and 26 are capable of further resilient radial displacement in response to substantial axial forces on the cups, thus permitting the internal apex of the ring 22 to pass the exterior 30 of a cylindrical portion of cup above the ring 26. As shown in FIG. 2, the fourth ring 28 of the upper cup is in a position to cooperate with the second ring 24 of the lower cup to resist excessive movement of one cup into the other in this way, which might lead to overriding of the sealing surfaces 18 and 16.

In the nested condition, the holding surfaces of the rings 22 and 26 make a second seal by their contact with each other.

If, as the cups are nested together, air becomes trapped between the side walls, with consequent rise of pressure, this pressure can escape by leakage between the rings 22 and 26. To permit this leakage, the crest of the first ring 22 is flattened at spaced parts around the cup. These flats enable the first ring 22 to flex into a 3 non-circular shape. and this permits the leakage, and ensures that the third ring of the cup is not overloaded, which might cause it to assume a lobed shape. The number of flats is preferably eight.

Between the rings 22 and 24 is a cylindrical portion 32. This, as moulded, has an internal diameter substantially the same as the external diameter of the cylindrical portion 34, between the rings 26 and 28. When two cups are in nested condition, the displacement of the first and third rings causes displacement of the cylindrical portions 32, 34, so that they do not interengage.

After initial manufacture, and before the space 36 between the bottoms of nested cups has been preloaded, the cups may be lightly nested together at a greater vertical spacing, with the fourth ring 28 of the upper cup resting on top of the first ring 22 of the lower cup. The cups can then readily be separated for preloading, and then nested in the position shown in FIG. 2.

The semi-vertical angle of the sealing surfaces 8 and need not be 30 as in this example. In particular, it may be less than 30, the choice depending on the ease of separation desired.

Over the majority of their height, there is a slight air gap between the side walls of the inner and outer members of the cup. Likewise there is a slight air gap between the bottom walls of the inner and outer members. As already mentioned, the members are secured together at the rims 10, 14. In addition, the members may interengage locally elsewhere, for transference of the weight of contents of the cup from the inner meminner member. This may enhance the effectiveness of the seal.

I claim:

1. A double-walled container capable of nesting and interlocking with another identically formed container with a space for storage of a concentrate between the bottom walls of the containers when nested and interlocked, said double-walled container comprising an inner member secured within an outer member, each member being formed of a seamless thin-walled plastics-material and each member comprising a bottom wall and an integral side wall extending generally upwardly and outwardly to the upper end thereof, the inner member including an upper sealing surface spaced from the bottom wall thereof a distance sufficient to provide a-space therebelow for storage of a concentrate, the outer member including a lower sealing surface at the junction of the bottom wall and side wall of said outer member, said upper and lower sealing surfaces being inclined to the axis of said container in a direction upwardly and outwardly of said container in a frusto-conical shape and cooperating to make a seal when two such containers are nested, a downwardly facing holding surface formed on said inner member to extend radially inwardly thereof, an upwardly facing holding surface formed in said outer member to extend radially inwardly thereof, said downwardly and upwardly facing holding surfaces formed in the side walls of said inner and outerlmembers above the midheight of said container and with the vertical distance between said downwardly facing holding surface and said upwardly facing sealing surface of said inner member being sufficiently less than the distance between said upwardly facing holding surface and said lower sealing surface of said outer member to produce axial and hoop stresses in the side wall of an inner member between the holding and sealing surfaces thereof of one container and in the side wall of the outer member between the holding and sealing surfaces thereof of another of said containers when nested in said one container with said holding surfaces overlapping each other to interlock said another and said one containers.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1137039 *Aug 25, 1911Apr 27, 1915American Can CoIndividual drinking-cup.
US1889111 *Feb 23, 1929Nov 29, 1932William SerrFlavor dispenser cup
US3186850 *Apr 28, 1960Jun 1, 1965Roy AnthonyCup containing beverage ingredient
US3372830 *Jun 23, 1964Mar 12, 1968Illinois Tool WorksInsulated double cup
US3485412 *Aug 27, 1968Dec 23, 1969American Can CoStackable plastic container
US3512677 *Jul 3, 1968May 19, 1970Illinois Tool WorksStackable container
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4124120 *Apr 28, 1977Nov 7, 1978Itw LimitedThin-walled cups capable of nesting
US4156483 *May 1, 1978May 29, 1979Illinois Tool Works Inc.Cups capable of nesting
US4237939 *Mar 12, 1979Dec 9, 1980H. Obrist & Co. AgStackable tube body having a layer of sealant material
US4368818 *Apr 13, 1981Jan 18, 1983Mono Containers (U.K.) LimitedCups for holding ingredients for drinks
US4548348 *Feb 27, 1984Oct 22, 1985Solo Cup CompanyDisposable cup assembly
US7677435 *Apr 10, 2006Mar 16, 2010Ptm Packaging Tools Machinery Pte. Ltd.Double-walled paperboard cup
US7699216 *Nov 4, 2004Apr 20, 2010Solo Cup Operating CorporationTwo-piece insulated cup
US7905821Dec 19, 2008Mar 15, 2011Ptm Packaging Tools Machinery Pte Ltd.Double-walled paperboard cup
US8146796Apr 21, 2006Apr 3, 2012Seda S.P.A.Cardboard container for drinks and process therefor
US8146797Nov 9, 2006Apr 3, 2012Seda S.P.A.Insulated cup
US8360263Apr 14, 2006Jan 29, 2013Seda S.P.A.Insulated container, method of fabricating same and apparatus for fabricating
US8393886Oct 13, 2006Mar 12, 2013Seda S.P.A.Device for producing a stacking projection and container with same
US8459531Sep 14, 2006Jun 11, 2013Seda S.P.A.Container and blank for the production thereof
US8490792Nov 30, 2007Jul 23, 2013Seda S.P.A.Package
US8708148 *Jul 21, 2011Apr 29, 2014Graphics Packaging International, Inc.Nestable container with uniform stacking features
US20110272317 *Jul 21, 2011Nov 10, 2011Wnek Patrick HNestable Container With Uniform Stacking Features
US20120104004 *Jul 6, 2010May 3, 2012Neil MarshallProcess for the Production of a Cup and a Plurality of Cups
US20120152865 *Dec 16, 2010Jun 21, 2012Lin ZhenwuStackable filter cup apparatus and method
CN101623234BAug 6, 2009Aug 22, 2012黄龙国Insulation container
DE2718480A1 *Apr 26, 1977Nov 24, 1977Itw LtdDuennwandiger becher zum ineinandersetzen
DE102009044772A1 *Dec 4, 2009Jun 9, 2011Huhtamäki OyjProduction method for sidewall-segment of container with shaping involves inserting shaping before forming sidewall-segment into sidewall of container and extends around entire periphery of container
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/519, 206/217, 220/62.11
International ClassificationB65D21/02, B65D1/26, B65D1/22
Cooperative ClassificationB65D1/265
European ClassificationB65D1/26B
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jun 13, 1986ASAssignment
Owner name: DART CONTAINER CORPORATION, 432 HOGSBACK ROAD, MAS
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:ILLINOIS TOOL WORKS, INC.;REEL/FRAME:004568/0710
Effective date: 19840127