Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3927800 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 23, 1975
Filing dateJan 17, 1974
Priority dateSep 20, 1973
Also published asCA1065489A1, DE2445165A1
Publication numberUS 3927800 A, US 3927800A, US-A-3927800, US3927800 A, US3927800A
InventorsRalph H Genz, Rodney L Johnson, James E Setliff, Herbert G Zinsmeyer
Original AssigneeDresser Ind
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Control and data system
US 3927800 A
Abstract
A gasoline dispenser control and data system comprising a central office and a plurality of local stations, each station having dispenser control functions, data storage functions and communication functions. The station has a dispenser control mode and data entry mode. In the dispenser control mode a dispenser may be set to dispense gasoline, such dispensing of gasoline resulting in the production of pulses which are accumulated in a counter. The dispenser may then be reset for the next sale. Upon reset the counter is returned to zero, and the previous sale is stored in a temporary memory for recall and display, also being stored in two separate permanent memories, one of which is accessible to the station operator and the other of which is not accessible to the station operator. In the data entry mode the station operator can enter data into some but not all permanent memories. The station data system may be telephoned by the central office and each memory interrogated. The central office may also enter new data in the station data system. There is a provision for interrupting transmission for a limited time for operation of dispensers on a limited basis. There is also a provision for automatically entering data such as the amount of gasoline in storage tanks in the station memory, for "in use" and "ready" signals for each dispenser, and for an emergency off function.
Images(7)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent n91 Zinsmeyer et al.

[5 1 CONTROL AND DATA SYSTEM [75] Inventors: Herbert G. Zinsmeyer; Rodney L.

Johnson, both of Austin; Ralph H. Genz, Leander; James E. Setlitf, Austin, all of Tex.

[73] Assignee: Dresser Industries, Inc., Dallas, Tex.

[22] Filed: Jan. 17, 1974 [21] Appl. No.: 434,196

Related US. Application Data [63] Continuation-impart of Ser. No. 398,987, Sept. 20,

1973, abandoned.

[52] US. Cl. 222/26; 222/32; 340/150 [51] Int. Cl. B67D 5/06 [58] Field of 222/23, 25-28, 222/32-36', 340/150-152; 235/92 FL, 151.34

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,084,548 6/1937 Bennett 222/26 X 3,130,870 4/1964 Phillips et al. 222/26 3,220,606 1 H1965 Mesh et al. 222/35 3,498,501 3/1970 Robbins et a1 222/26 3,593,883 7/1971 Robbins 222/35 X 3,705,385 12/1972 Batz 340/152 R 3,731,777 5/1973 Burke et a1. 194/13 Martell 340/151 III/r144! (All/Vi 1 Dec. 23, 1975 Primary Examiner-Allen N. Knowles Assistant Examiner-Joseph J. Rolla [57] ABSTRACT A gasoline dispenser control and data system comprising a central ofiice and a plurality of local stations, each station having dispenser control functions, data storage functions and communication functions. The station has a dispenser control mode and data entry mode. In the dispenser control mode a dispenser may be set to dispense gasoline, such dispensing of gasoline resulting in the production of pulses which are accumulated in a counter. The dispenser may then be reset for the next sale. Upon reset the counter is returned to zero, and the previous sale is stored in a temporary memory for recall and display, also being stored in two separate permanent memories, one of which is accessible to the station operator and the other of which is not accessible to the station operator. In the data entry mode the station operator can enter data into some but not all permanent memories. The station data system may be telephoned by the central office and each memory interrogated. The central office may also enter new data in the station data system. There is a provision for interrupting transmission for a limited time for operation of dispensers on a limited basis. There is also a provision for automatically entering data such as the amount of gasoline in storage tanks in the station memory, for in use and ready signals for each dispenser, and {or an emergency off function.

42 Claims, 9 Drawing Figures Pan/z: Ill/fl) U.S. Patent Dec. 23, 1975 Sheet 1 of? 3,927,800

kw iwo \au u umouwomamwammbis wvflbamu owmeanmuQuQmxQvmQ US. Patent Dec. 23, 1975 Sheet 2 of7 3,927,800

US. Patent Dec. 23, 1975 Sheet 3 of7 3,927,800

US. Patent Dec. 23, 1975 Sheet 5 of7 3,927,800

US. Patent Dec. 23, 1975 Sheet 7 of 7 3,927,800

CONTROL AND DATA SYSTEM This is a continuation-in-part of application Ser. No. 398,987 filed Sept. 20, 1973, now abandoned.

CROSS REFERENCES TO RELATED APPLICATIONS This application in part discloses subject matter which is described in greater detail in co-pending application Ser. No. 388,593, now abandoned, entitled Level Sensor" filed on Aug. 15, 1973, by Herbert G. Zinsmeyer, Rodney L. Johnson and Ralph H. Genz, and assigned to the same assignee as the present application.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention relates to control and data storage systems, and more particularly to such systems as are suitable for controlling the dispensing of liquids and storing and retrieving data relating to the amounts of such liquids which are dispensed.

2. Description of the Prior Art Retail gasoline service stations commonly are provided with several, e.g. four, gasoline storage tanks, each of which contains a suction or submerged pump to pump gasoline to a plurality, e.g. 16 or more, dispensers for the gasoline. Each dispenser has a hose and nozzle with a hand-operated valve, and a manual switch to turn the dispenser on and off. Counters are provided at the dispenser to create visual displays of the quantity of gasoline dispensed and the total amount of each sale in dollars. Cumulative totals of gallons and dollars are also displayed.

In the retail dispensing of gasoline, self-service stations have become more and more desirable because of the savings in cost of operation. In many such stations the gasoline dispensing device counter drives a pulse generator, the pulses from which are fed to a central monitoring console to produce a remote indication of the amount of gasoline and dollar amount of each sale. Thus a single operator may monitor sales of a number of gasoline dispensers and collect payment for such sales.

To meet the demand for monitoring and control systems for use in such self-service stations, a number of systems have been devised. One of such systems is that disclosed in US. Pat. No. 3,598,283 to Krutz, et al which provides means for presetting the sale amount on the pump. A pulse generator at the pump provides pulses which are counted and accumulated at the attendants console, and a display is provided so that the attendant may view the amount of the sale.

US. Pat. No. 3,437,240 to Keeler discloses another system for providing the total of the gasoline sale to a remote location, as does US. Pat. No. 3,402,851.

Most of the prior art systems utilize a separate display for each pump, but the system of US. Pat. No. 3,632,988 to Tamawaki, et al provides for storing signals from a plurality of pumps in a memory and selectively addressing the memory to provide a display for a selected pump.

In the case of a gasoline retailer who owns a number of stations, particularly stations which are scattered over a wide area, it is often difficult to fully monitor the operations of the stations. It is desirable for planning to be fully advised of sales and marketing conditions at all locations, and to be able to promptly advise station 5 obtained from station attendants was dlffiCllIl to check.

Systems have been advised for providing various control and monitoring functions between a central office and a plurality of service stations or other dispensing locations. For example, the patent to Jacket US. Pat. No. 3,130,867 discloses a pipeline metering and product delivery control system by which the central office can preset amounts of liquid to be delivered to various locations and can interrogate counters located at delivery locations to determine amounts delivered. A capability of monitoring and controlling a number of stations is provided. Means are provided at the central office for displaying the amounts of sales.

However, no system has heretofore been devised by which a central office can fully and promptly monitor the operations of a number of local self-service gasoline stations, including sales from each dispenser, inventory, and other data important in planning future operations, and can at the same time be assured of the accuracy of the information obtained. Nor has any such system been devised which allows a single station operator to monitor sales on a plurality of dispensers, including temporarily storing data on a previous sale and recalling the previous sale which a further sale is continuing, and at the same time give the operator the capability of instantly determining fuel inventories and levels of water in each of a plurality of storage tanks.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is an object of the present invention to provide a control and data system for controlling the dispensing of liquids, monitoring dispensed amounts, accumulating totals of dispensed amounts, and transmitting data to a central office.

More particularly it is an object of this invention to provide a control and data system for a self-service gasoline station in which a plurality of gasoline dispensers may be controlled and monitored, utilizing a digital computer which is programmed for temporary and permanent storage of data from each pump and for recall and display of sales, as well as for storing continuously updated data on the amount of gasoline remaining in storage tanks. Additionally, means are provided for insertion of additional data by the operator or from a remote central office location, and for interrogation of the memory of the computer from the remote central office location.

Another object of this invention is to provide a pump control and data system which will allow resetting of a pump for operation by a second customer and will allow the amount to be added to permanent memory, while allowing the previous sale to be stored in a temporary memory which can be displayed when selected by the operator.

Still another object of this invention is to provide a system by which certain permanent memory locations may be entered by the local attendant while others are secluded from him and accessible only from a central office location, the accessible and inaccessible memory locations including redundant data for verification purposes.

Another object is to provide for operation of gasoline dispensers on a limited basis during transmission of data from the service station to the central office,

3 whereby data transmission periods do not interrupt operation of the service station.

These and other objects of the invention will become more apparent upon consideration of the following description of a preferred embodiment and of the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is an isometric, somewhat simplified view of apparatus for the practice of one embodiment of this invention;

FIG. 2 is a block diagram of the major components of one embodiment of the apparatus of this invention;

FIG. 3 is a block diagram of electrical circuitry associated with each dispenser according to one embodiment of this invention;

FIG. 4 is a block diagram of apparatus for receiving, storing, processing, displaying and transmitting data from the dispensers;

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of apparatus included at the dispensers at a self-service station for converting rotary motion of the counting mechanism at the dispensers into electrical signals for transmission to a central position at the station;

FIG. 6 is a sectional view of the apparatus shown in FIG. 5; and is taken substantially on the line 6-6 of FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is a circuit diagram of certain stages shown on a somewhat schematic basis in FIG. 3; FIG. 8 is a circuit diagram of still other stages shown on a somewhat schematic basis in FIG. 3; and

FIG. 9 is a circuit diagram of further stages shown on a somewhat schematic basis in FIG. 3.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS For the sake of simplicity and ease of understanding, the preferred embodiments of this invention will be described in terms of application of the invention to self-service gasoline stations, although it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that the invention has applicability to dispensing and sale of other liquid products and also of gas and solid products.

The description will also refer to an arrangement involving a central office and plurality of local service stations to which data is sent from a central office and from which data is received upon interrogation by the central office. However, such various combinations and sub-combinations of this invention are applicable to the individual service stations, where no central office is involved, therefore the invention should not be considered to be limited to service stations which communicate with the central office.

General Description In the preferred embodiment of the invention which will hereinafter be described in detail, apparatus is provided at a local station for controlling one or more gasoline dispensers, for receiving, displaying and storing data on inventory of gasoline in storage tanks, for transmitting this data and other data inserted by the station operator to a central office, and for transmitting data from the central office to the service station. The term gasoline dispenser" is used herein in preference to the term gasoline pump because of the fact that in most service stations submerged pumps are used to pump gasoline to a plurality of dispensers, and the dispensers themselves do not contain individual pumps.

The usual gasoline dispenser is provided with a flow meter which drives a counter having two outputs, one in gallons and the other in dollars. These outputs are transmitted to separate registers, where they are displayed as they are generated in a visual display, and are also added to a cumulative total display. In some cases such registers are mechanically driven from the flow meter, whereas in other cases a pulse generator, as for example a magnet and a reed switch attached to the shaft of the flow meter, is used to generate signals for the counters. In either event, the counter and register apparatus includes two shaft outputs, one of which rotates at a speed proportional to the gallons register and the other of which rotates at a speed proportional to the dollars register.

According to the present invention, the functions described hereinbefore are accomplished by apparatus which includes pulse generators driven by the proportional dispenser register counter shafts, one pulse generator producing pulses in proportion to the gallons dispensed and the other producing pulses in proportion to the number of dollars registered and displayed at the dispenser. These pulses are transmitted to counters. A console is provided which includes a keyboard and various displays. The keyboard and displays are connected through a central processor unit, which forms a part of a digital micro-computer, to various memory storage locations. The operator may create a display of the number of gallons and the dollar amount of a sale which is in process or which has just concluded at any selected dispenser by merely pressing the numbered keys of the keyboard corresponding to the number of the dispenser. The operator may also create a display of the preceding sale for that dispenser by pressing a recall key. The operator may also reset the dispenser for another sale. Upon reset, both the pulse counters are returned to zero, and the previous sale is stored in a temporary memory for recall and display on the console. Upon reset, the amount of the sale is also added to a cumulative total of sales stored in two separate memory locations, one of which is accessible to the station operator and the other of which is accessible only to the central office. Means are provided by which the total amount in the first of these memory locations may be read and written in a third memory location,,as for example at the end of each shift, so that the home office can interrogate the station data system at any time during the succeeding shift and determine the total of sales during the preceding shift.

The station data system also has a data entry mode in which the station operator can enter data into some of the memory locations. For example, it may be desired by the central office that the station operator enter data reflecting a competitors selling prices, weather information, maintenance difficulties, personnel problems, etc.

Means are provided for automatically entering data in selected memory locations reflecting the amount of gasoline is storage tanks at the station, such data being provided, for example, by apparatus such as that disclosed in the aforesaid co-pending application.

In the event of a power failure means is provided for automatically protecting memory. In addition, the apparatus has an emergency shut-off function, whereby the station operator can, in the event of fire or other emergency, shut off all dispenser operations.

The central office is provided with a computer which can interrogate the memories of the station computer,

through a conventional telephone line and data coupler, and obtain a readout of data stored in any of the memory locations of the station computer. During such interrogation a lamp is lighted on the station console to indicate that transmitting is in progress. During the transmitting operation the station operator cannot enter data or recall sales information from temporary storage. However, he can temporarily interrupt transmission to reset dispensers and recall previous sales in order to receive payment. Thus even during interrogation by the home office, some operation of station dispensers is permitted.

In the following description a service station having 16 gasoline dispensers and four gasoline storage tanks will be discussed. However, it will be apparent that the apparatus and system may be modified as necessary for a larger or lesser number of dispensers and storage tanks.

FIG. 1 of the drawing shows pictorially, and somewhat schematically, a preferred embodiment of equipment comprised in the apparatus of this invention. Thus, as shown in this drawing, a console is connected to an electronic cabinet 12 and to a data coupler 14. The data coupler, in the embodiment shown, is connected directly into a telephone line 16. The electronic cabinet is provided with power for a power supply unit 18 which converts and regulates power input from both 110 volt AC source 20 and an auxiliary power supply which may comprise a rechargeable battery 22, which provides power to protect the memory in the event of a power failure. An ordinary 8 volt wet cell may be used, for example. Data is supplied to the electronic cabinet from the dispensers, one of which is illustrated at 24, and from the level sensors and transmitters, one of which is shown at 25.

The console 10 is provided with a conventional keyboard 26, having keys number from 0 to 9, and keys labeled reset, emergency stop", enter, recall" and clear. A key operated switch 28 has two positions, pump control and "data entry. A panel light 30 is provided for indication of the existence of transmission from the station to the central office, and a panel light 32 is provided for indication of transmission of new data from the home office to the station. A shift-change push-button is provided at 33, and a transmit-interrupt" push-button is provided at 31. A plurality of ready" and in-use" panel lights 34 and 36, respectively, are provided, one for each gasoline dispenser. The console also has provision for display of three different numbers at 38, 40 and 42. At location 38 two numerals may be displayed, at location 40 three numerals may be displayed, and at location 42 five numerals may be displayed. The display may utilize conventional seven segment displays (light emitting diodes such as Monsantos MAN-l0), nixie tubes or any other suitable display device.

The dispenser 24 has the conventional hose and nozzle 44 and the conventional manual switch 46 which must be turned on before any gasoline can be dispensed. In addition, the dispenser is provided with an encoder 48 to provide pulses indicative of the number of dollars of the sale and an encoder 50 to provide pulses indicative of the gallons of gasoline dispensed.

In FIG. 2 the major components of the apparatus of this invention are shown in block diagram. Thus 16 different dispensers are shown, numbered 24-1 through 24-16, and four different level sensors and transmitters are shown, numbered -1 through 25-4. The dispensers are provided with fuel by one or more submerged pumps 52. The dispenser electronic system 54 is connected to receive signals from the dispensers and also to feed signals to the dispensers. In addition, the dispenser electronic system provides signals to energize the submerged pumps so that gasoline may be pumped to the dispensers when required. As will later be explained, means are also provided for selectively operating the dispensers independently of the electronic system, so that a signal may be sent directly from any one of the dispensers to the submerged pump to cause it to operate.

The output of the level sensor transmitters is received and processed in the level sensor computer 56, one form of which is disclosed in the aforesaid co-pending application.

Data from the dispenser electronic system 54 and from the level sensor computer are fed through an interface 58 which provides suitable connection to a digital micro-computer 60 and keyboard and display apparatus 62. The digital computer 60 communicates with a home office computer 64 (see FIG. 2) through a communication interface modem 61 and a conventional data coupler 14, as by means of the telephone line 16 or by means of radio transmission or the like.

Dispenser Electronics FIG. 3 shows schematically and in block diagram the electrical circuitry utilized in the operation and monitoring of a single dispenser 24. The same or similar circuitry is used with each of the other dispensers.

As previously noted, the dispenser 24 contains encoders 48 and 50 which, in the preferred embodiment, comprise perforated discs 60, 67 mounted on output shafts on the dispenser counter (not shown) for rotation so that the perforations of each disc pass between a light emitting diode (LED) 68 and a photo transistor 69, each LED and photo transistor forming a photocoupler which is used as an encoder in the preferred form of this invention. Other types of encoders known in the art may be used, as for example, the type which utilizes rotating magnets and a reed switch, but the perforated disc type encoder just described is preferred for its accuracy. A variety of photocouplers are available on the market which are suitable for use in this application. One example of such a photocoupler is that manufactured and sold by Spectronics, Inc., as Part Nos. SD-l440-3 and SE-l4S0-3.

Pulser drivers 70, 71 are connected to the photocouplers, providing an output current to the LEDs and receiving, amplifying and transmitting pulses from the photo transistors. The outputs from the pulser drivers 70, 71 are fed through the pulse shapers 72, 73, respectively, which are basically Schmitt triggers. The pulse shapers introduce hysterisis into the signals in order to reject electrical noise, and to compensate for unwanted mechanical jitter or vibration of the disks 66 and 67. The output pulse trains from the pulse shapers are sent through gates 74, 75, respectively, and then to the dollars counters 76 and the gallons counters 77. These preferably comprise decade counters which store the counts in 4-bit binary coded decimal (BDC) form.

The dollars encoder 48 is preferably designed to emit a pulse for each 0001 dollars value of fuel dispensed, and the gallons encoder 50 is preferably designed to emit a pulse for each 0.0] gallon of fuel dispensed. In order that the counters may count up to $99999 and up to 99.99 gallons, the dollars counters comprise five decade counters and the gallons counters comprise four decade counters. Data is transferred from these decade counters through a gating circuit 98.

It will be noted that although the gallons counter provides four significant figures, only three are provided on the display. This is sufficient for sales purposes, since customers are not interested in hundredths of a gallon and the tenths digit is rounded up or down to the nearest tenth. However, the totals stored in memory are accurate to a hundredth of a gallon. Dollars are displayed to three decimal places, so that the price charged can be adjusted to the nearest cent.

As is well known in the art, the counters in gasoline dispensers must be reset to zero following each sale before additional gasoline can be dispensed. The reset is accomplished by means of a manual switch adjacent to the nozzle receptacle, as shown at 46 in FIG. 1. The operation of this switch closes a circuit in which a reset motor 78 (see FIG. 3) is connected, so that the reset motor runs to reset the counters to zero. The reset motor shaft drives a cam which, when the dispenser counters have been reset to zero, engages a normally closed switch 79 in the reset motor circuit, thereby opening the switch so that the reset motor stops. Switch 79 is mechanically connected to a normally open switch 82, so that when switch 79 is opened, switch 82 is closed. Switches 79 and 82 are also connected to a manual switch 46, so that switch 79 is closed and switch 82 is opened when switch 46 is opened.

According to the present invention, an additional switch 80 is provided in the reset motor circuit. Switch 80 is a three-position switch which may be set at any of automatic", oft and manual. When set at manual the reset motor circuit is grounded and the dispenser may be operated in the normal manner, without being reset from the console. When set at "off" the dispenser may not be operated at all, and when set at automatic" the control system of the present invention becomes effective.

When switch 82 is closed, in either the manual or automatic mode an in use" signal is present in conductor 84. A tap 83 off this conductor to ground through switch 80 contains a relay coil 85, which, when an in use" signal is present, holds relay switches 87 closed, to provide 220 volt AC to operate the submerged pump. The tap 83 also contains diode wired OR" gates 89 and 92, which are connected to corresponding taps 83 of other dispensers of the same grade of gasoline, so that a single relay coil 85 and switch 87 may be used with a single pump for each grade of gasoline.

An isolator comprising a photocoupler 86, such as, for example, Monsanto's No. MCTZE, provides electrical isolation between the power line voltage level in line 84 and the low logic voltage level of the remainder of the circuit. The output of the photocoupler isolator is sent to a delay network 88 which produces an in use output signal coincident with the in use signal at its input, but which delays the cessation of the "in use" a short time (preferably approximately 1.5 seconds) relative to the cessation of the "in use" signal at the input of the delay network. This delay allows continued transmission of any pulses generated after switch 46 is opened, as may occur if this switch is opened while the nozzle is dispensing gasoline. The in use" output from the delay network is sent to a lamp driver 90 which illuminates one of the lamps 36 one the console to 8 inform the operator that this particular dispenser is being used.

The in use" indication is also sent to a triac gate 92. The output of the triac gate is an enabling signal which is sent through a photocoupler isolator 94, such as, for example, General Electric Companys No. Hl lCl to a triac switch 96. The triac switch provides a connection to ground for the reset motor circuit and relay coil 85 when the switch 80 is on automatic".

The in use signal to the pulser drivers and 71, serves as a control signal to enable the pulser drivers (through an optical isolator that provides electrical isolation to meet intrinsic safety requirements for hazardous environments.) The in use" signal sets the ready" flip-flop 100 to not ready", and the gate 102 which prevents a reset signal from setting the ready" flip-flop 100. The in use indication is also sent to the gates 74 and 75 where it enables these gates and allows the pulses from the pulse shapers 72 and 73 to be entered into the decade counters 76 and 77. The in use signal is generated even when the switch 80 is on manual", therefore if the dispenser is operated in the manual mode generated pulses will be counted at the counters 76, 77.

Other components depicted in FIG. 3 will now be described although the function and operation of these components will not be described in detail until afier a description of the components shown in FIG. 4. Thus gating circuitry 98 is provided for reading out the stored BCD count of the counters 76 and 77. A ready" flip-flop 100 receives as one of its inputs the in use" signal and as the other of its inputs a signal from gate 102 which is enabled by a "power on" signal from circuit 104, or by a "device select" signal accompanied by a reset signal when there is no in use" signal present. After a power failure, upon restoration of power the power up" circuit sends a pulse to all of the decade counters at 76, 77, to cause all outputs on the counters to read zero. This is necessary, since whenever electrical power is first supplied to the integrated circuits utilized in the preferred embodiment, the output of the counters is unpredictable.

The output from the ready flip-flop 100 is fed to a ready lamp driver 108 to cause illumination of the ready" lamp 34 on the console, and is also fed as an input to the triac gate 92. The third input to the triac gate is the emergency stop" input, supplied through conduit 1 10.

Station Electronics FIG. 4 depicts the service station electronic system which is connected through the interface 58 to each of the dispenser electronic systems, as depicted in FIG. 3.

The heart of this system is a micro-computer system, such as the MCS-4 produced by Intel Corp. of Santa Clara, California and described in Intel's "Users Manual" dated March, 1972. This set includes a central processor unit 114, memory storage 116 and program control 1 18. The central processor unit (CPU) communicates with the home oflice through the communications interface comprising the modulator-demodulator (modem) 61 and the data coupler 14. The data coupler may, for example, comprise a type lOOlA CBS, available on lease from the Bell Telephone Company, and the modem may be a Tele-Dynamics Model 71138.

Instructions are provided through the CPU from the keyboard 26, as shown in FIG. 1, and data selected for display by the keyboard is decoded from BCD to deci- 9 mal by the CPU and displayed, through the driver 122, at the various displays of the console 10.

To transfer the contents of a counter 76, 77 of one of the dispensers or data from one of the tank lever sensors 25 to the CPU, a data bus 124 is provided. Data transmitted is multiplexed to transmit one digit at a time, since speed of transmission is not important. The data bus consists of four parallel electrical signal conductors which are connected in a parallel electrical manner; that is, each of the four conductors is electrically connected to each of the 16 output gates of the 16 dispensers, and to each of the four level sensors. Thus the four signal conductors of the data bus transfer in parallel, simultaneously, the four-bit BCD output of either one of the counters or one of the level sensors. A data bus driver 126 is provided for transfer of such data into the CPU.

The counter or level sensor whose data is to be transmitted is determined by a device select" signal which is created by pressing identifying keys on the keyboard. The CPU, in response, feeds an identifying signal to the device select decoder 128, which decodes the signal and produces an output device select signal to the dispenser counter board or tank level sensor selected. The CPU is programmed to multiplex transmission of data, and therefore sends a series of "digit select" signals to the digit select decoder 132 which provides an output signal through one of four digit select conductors 134. A control buffer 136 comprises a driver for signals transmitted from the keyboard through the CPU, to provide an emergency stop" signal through conductor 110 and a "reset signal through conductor 140.

In a data system for 16 gasoline dispensers and four gasoline storage tanks, a memory having, for example, 160 memory locations will provide adequate capacity. Each location should be capable of storing eight BCD digits of 4 bits each, i.e. 32 bits. Memory locations may, for example, be used as follows:

Spare l-16 accumulated dollars for each of 16 dispensers 17-32 accumulated gallons for each of 16 dispensers 33-36 gasoline levels in each of four storage tanks 37 spare 38-74 data read from locations 1-37 at end of shift 75-106 spare 107-110 gasoline levels in each of four storage tanks 111 spare 112-127 accumulated dollars for each of 16 dispensers 128-143 temporary storage, dollars, for recall 144-159 temporary storage, gallons, for recall Operation The system of this invention has two modes of operation, i.e. pump control" and "data entry", as determined by the switch 28 on the console. A lock switch is preferred to prevent entry of data by unauthorized persons. In the data entry mode program control provides that the station operator may enter data at any of memory locations 0 to 99 by pressing keys corresponding to the selected memory location, and then following this by pressing keys corresponding to the data to be entered. The enter" key is then pressed to enter the data. Preferably only two digits are provided for addressing memory locations, so that the operator is limited to addressing locations 0 to 99. Data in BCD form containing up to eight digits may be entered in the memory locations. In this mode of operation the program control prevents any resetting of the dispensers and prevents any read-out of data from the dispenser counters or the level sensors, but the dispensers and dispenser counters are not inhibited from operation.

in the data entry mode, various of the spare memory locations listed above may be designated for entry of particular specified data. For example, memory location 0 may be used for the station telephone number or other identification, and memory location may be used to show the selling price of a particular competitor.

As the keys are pressed, first the memory location identification will appear at display 38 on the console, and then the other data entered, which is at this point held in temporary memory in the CPU, will appear at displays 40 and 42. The operator may thus check his entry to be sure that it is accurate and then press the enter" key to enter the data in permanent memory. If the display indicates that the entry is wrong, it may be removed by pressing the clear" key. Data already in a memory may be displayed by addressing the appropriate memory location and pressing the recall" key.

When the system is first installed, it is desirable that the accumulated dollars and accumulated gallons stored in memory locations 1 to 32 be identical to the accumulated totals shown on the dispenser totalizer registers. This data is entered in memory for each dispenser with the switch 28 turned to the data entry mode. Thus for dispenser 10 the number 10" is first designated by means of the keyboard so that the number 10 appears at display 38. Keys corresponding to the number of dollars shown on the dispenser register are then pressed, this total number being displayed at displays 40 and 42. When the numbers are checked, the enter" key is depressed to enter these in memory.

Memory location 26 is then addressed and keys corresponding to the number of gallons accumulated on the dispenser register are depressed and this amount is entered. When all dispensers are initialized, key switch 28 may then be turned to pump control" and the system is ready for operation. The program control prevents the entry of any data from the keyboard in the pump control" mode.

initially, each dispenser must be reset to prepare the dispenser for operation. The initial power up causes the delay circuit 88 to emit an in use signal for a short period, thereby turning the ready" flip-flop to not ready. Thus it is necessary to reset each dispenser by depressing keys on the console corresponding to the numbers of each of the dispensers, in each case followed by pressing the "reset key. The power up" circuit will initialize the counters to all zeros and the data stored in memory locations l-32 will not be disturbed by resetting the dispensers. In the pump control mode the pressing of keys corresponding to a particular pump number provides, through the CPU and the "device select" decoder 128, a device select" signal which is supplied to the output gates 98 of the selected dispenser and to the gating circuit 102 which turns on the "ready" flip-flop 100.

The ready" flip-flop 100 is set to not ready" by an "in use" signal, and is reset to ready" by a signal from the gating circuit 102. This gating circuit, as previously noted, is enabled by the presence of a reset and 1 1 device select" signal with no in use" signal, or by a power up" signal. This switches the ready flip-flop to a ready" state so that an output is provided to the ready lamp through the lamp driver 108. In addition, a ready" signal is provided to the triac gate 92, which allows a dispenser to be used.

The initiation of an in use" signal, which occurs when switch 82 is closed after the reset motor cycle initiated by closing manual switch 46, changes the state of the ready flip-flop 100 to the not ready" state. In addition, the in use" lamp is energized, and the gates 74, 75 leading to the decade counters 76, 77 are enabled so that pulses from the pulse generators 48, 50 may be counted. The in use" signal also has an input to the triac gate 92. This gate is enabled if there is either an "in use" or a ready" signal, together with no emergency stop" signal. The in use signal continues to activate the triac gate 92, the photocoupler isolator 94, and the triac switch 96. When switch 82 is closed, relay coil 85 is activated so that switches 87 are closed to supply current to the submerged pump motor.

When the dispenser operation ceases and the customer turns off the manual switch 46, the "in use" signal disappears, after a short delay, by virtue of switch 82 being opened, and the triac gate 92 is no longer enabled. Thus once the dispensing has been completed for one sale, the triac switch 96 will open and will remain open until a reset command is received from the CPU. The triac switch remains open because the ready" flip-flop is not reset to ready until the reset command is received. The mere closing of manual switch 46 will not provide an "in use" signal because the triac switch is open and therefore the reset motor circuit is not closed to ground. Thus, once the triac switch opens, there must be a reset" command generated by the CPU to reset the ready flip-flop and thereby enable the triac gate, which then closes the triac switch before the dispenser can again dispense fuel. The reset command is initiated by a key on the keyboard, but it is not sent to the ready" flip-flop by the CPU until the contents of the decade counters 76, 77 have all been transferred by means of the data bus 124 to the CPU. When this transfer has occurred, the CPU issues the reset" command to the gating circuit 102 and thus to the ready" flip-flop, thereby providing an enabling signal to the triac gate and closing the triac switch, and to the counters 76, 77 to reset them to zero. Thus the reset command both resets the counters and returns the dispensers to the ready state.

To reduce electrical power and data processing requirements, the operational format of the CPU selected for use in the preferred embodiment of the present invention reads out the contents of a single decade counter of counters 76, 77 at a time and from only one dispenser at a time.

The readout and reset of the counters 76, 77 upon pressing the reset" key on the keyboard is provided through program control. Thus the CPU selects a particular device address code in response to the pressing of keys on the keyboard identifying the device which is being reset. For the preferred embodiment disclosed, a total of sixteen dispensers and four underground fuel storage tank sensors can be monitored. The addresses of these inputs are stored in binary form, so a five bit binary address format which can handle up to 32 separate addresses is used to address these inputs. A device select decoder 128 comprising a 540-20 decoder selects one of the sixteen dispensers or one of the four tank level sensors for reading into the CPU. This signal enables the four output gates 98 of the particular selected device, which allow the four bit parallel BCD data from a particular counter enabled to be read. But in the preferred embodiment, in order to transfer out the four bit parallel BCD data, a digit select" signal must be present also. The digits are selected in sequence by the program control. Thus, for selecting which of the nine decade counters in counters 76, 77 is to be read out, a 440-10 digit select decoder 132 is used. The output of each decade counter is a four bit BCD word which represents one of the nine decimal digits contained in the nine counters The four bit output is read simultaneously in parallel from the selected counter. Likewise, a four bit parallel output is available from each tank level sensor.

It should be noted that although both a device select and a digit select must be sent to a dispenser counter board in order to transfer data to the data bus for transmittal to the CPU, neither signal is required to operate the dispenser or for the counters to receive and count encoder pulses.

While a sale is in progress, or after the sale is completed but before reset, the amount of the sale can be displayed by depressing the keys identifying the particular dispenser. The program control thus causes device select" and digit select signals to be supplied to the output gates 98 for reading of the contents of the counters 76, 77, but no data is transferred to memory. upon reset the program control causes the totals in the counters to be added to the contents in memory of memory locations 1 to 32 for the particular dispenser. At the same time the dollar amount in the counter 76 is added to the amount in the appropriate memory storage of addresses 112 to 127. In addition the amounts in the counters are temporarily stored in the appropriate ones of memory locations 128 to 159.

Then by pressing keys corresponding to the dispenser number and the recall" key, the amount of the previous sale can be displayed.

Upon completion of the next sale and an additional reset, the amounts in the temporary storage are replaced by the amounts of the new sale.

An emergency stop" command is received by the control buffer 136 whenever the operator depresses the "emergency stop key on the keyboard. Whenever this occurs the triac gate is inhibited, thereby causing the triac switch to open. The emergency stop" command is sent to all dispenser counter boards simultaneously.

Electrical power is supplied to the relay coil through OR gate 89 from any dispenser of the same grade. Thus the relay coil 85 activates the switches 87 and the submerged pump whenever any dispenser of the same grade is operated. OR gate 91 is used to allow each reset motor to be controlled independently, but not disable the relay coil 85 when another dispenser of the same grade is in operation. If an "emergency stop" command is issued by the CPU, all triac switches are opened to disable all submerged pumps.

The submerged pump motor is also cut off if none of the dispensers is in use. As explained above, after the dispensing operation is completed for each sale, neither the ready nor the in use" signal is present at the input of the triac gate to enable it and therefore the triac switch for that dispenser opens. Hence, if none of the dispensers for one grade of gasoline is in use, then all triac switches for those dispensers are open and the submerged pump motor for that grade of gasoline is turned off.

Upon completion of a sale at a dispenser, the station operator may determine the amount of the sale in order to receive payment by merely pressing keys corresponding to the dispenser number. For example, to display the amount of the sale just completed at dispenser 24-10, the operator addresses Under program control, this produces a display of the dispenser number (10) and the totals of both of the counters 76 and 77 for dispenser 24-10.

If a new customer wishes to use the dispenser before payment has been received for the last sale, the dispenser and its counters may be reset to zero by pressing keys addressing the particular dispenser, and then the reset key. This causes the totals in the counters 76 and 77 for dispenser 24-10 of the above example, to be stored in temporary memory locations 137 and 153, respectively, following the scheme of memory locations shown on page 21, and also causes these totals to be added to the accumulated totals in memory locations 10 and 26, respectively. The dollars count from counter 76 for dispenser 24-10 is also added to the accumulated total in memory location 121 as described earlier. The previous sale can then be recalled from temporary storage by pressing the dispenser number and the recall" key, and the gallons and dollars of the previous sale is thereby displayed.

In a preferred embodiment of the invention, program control causes the displays 38, 40 and 42 to blink if keys are pressed in the wrong order to two keys are pressed at the same time. The display may be cleared at any time by merely pressing the clear" key.

The operator may determine the amount of fuel in any of the storage tanks by switching to the data entry made and then pressing keys addressing the memory locations of these storage tanks (e.g. one of locations 33-36) and pressing the recall" key. This will cause the display of the amount of fuel in the selected storage tanks.

In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the respective signals from the level sensors are interpreted and indicator lights on the console panel are energized to display low inventory and water in tank warnings. The level sensor is disclosed in full detail in co-pending application Ser. No. 388,593, now abandoned.

As previously noted, the operator may enter data in any of memory locations 0-99, and data is temporarily stored in locations 128 to 159 for recall. However, memory locations 100-127 are accessible only to the central office. Thus, to provide a check on the data in memory locations 1-16 and 33-36, to determine whether any erroneous data has been entered, redundant memory locations 112-127 and 107-110 are provided.

At the end of a shift, or at other times as desired, the data stored in memory locations 1-37 may be read and written in memory locations 38-74. This is accomplished through program control by pressing pushbuttom 33 on the console. This data is therefore preserved for reading at any time during the succeeding shift.

As previously noted, communication with the home office computer is performed in a conventional manner through a data-coupler and, for example, a telephone line. The home office computer is programmed to telephone the station and, after identifying signals, transmit a transmitting" signal to the station computer. By program control, a XMTG" light 30 is illuminated on the console, and the CPU, keyboard, and related station equipment is inhibited from operation. However, the dispensers and their counters may continue to operate. The station operator may interrupt transmission for a limited time e.g. 15 seconds, if desired for the purpose of displaying a sale, resetting a dispenser or recalling a previous sale. This is accomplished by pressing the transmission interrupt push-button 31 on the console. Through program control, the home office computer is instructed to stop transmitting. Transmission automatically resumes at the end of the transmission interrupt period.

In the event of any emergency, e.g. fire, gasoline spillage, severe windstorm, etc., the station operator has the capability of completely shutting down all dispensers and pumps, without disturbing memories, by pressing the Emergency Stop key. Under program control, this causes the CPU to send a pulse to the triac gate 92, disabling the gate so that no signal is sent to the triac switch 96, and the switch is thus opened.

The home office computer may also enter data in the memory of the station computer. When doing so, the home office computer transmits a signal to illuminate the new data" light 32 on the console. After transmission, such data may be viewed by the station operator by pressing keys to address the appropriate memories, and pressing the recall" key. The new data" light may be turned off by pressing the key marked The program control involves only conventional operations, familiar to computer programmers; therefore it is not necessary to set forth the program herein. The invention does not lie in the program, but in the control and data system itself, particularly as applied to selfservice gasoline stations, and various chain operations, some of which may use only the manual data input and telephone communications.

Details of Components and Stages Previously Described Somewhat schematically FIGS. 5 and 6 illustrate apparatus for converting mechnical indications provided by the encoders 48 and 50 in FIG. 1 to electrical signals digitally representing such mechanical indications. For example, as the encoder 48 is rotated to indicate the monetary value (price) of the product dispensed by the dispenser 24 and its mechanical computer, the apparatus shown in FIGS. 5 and 6 is operated to produce electrical pulse signals. The pulses are counted which represents the value of fluid dispensed. Similar apparatus to that shown in FIGS. 5 and 6 may be provided to produce electrical pulse signals which represents the volume (gallons) of such product dispensed as indicated by the encoder 50.

As shown in FIGS. 5 and 6, the rotary disc 66 (also shown in FIG. 3) is mounted on the dollars rotary shaft 49 of the dispenser mechanical computer by means of set screws 67 for rotation with the shaft, and is provided with equally spaced apertures 202 around its periphery. A forked frame 204 embraces the rotary disc 66 at the hub on both sides, and supports a replaceable slotted block 206 at the periphery of the disc 66. A frame anchoring brace 208 is fixed to a stationary pin 210 of the dispenser mechanical computer at one end and is attached at the other end as at 209 to the forked frame 204 in pivotal relationship to the frame.

The light-emitting diode 68 (also shown in FIG. 3) is disposed in a mounting hole in one side of the replace= able block 200 as lhown in cross-section in FIG. 6, and

the transistor 69 (also shown in FIG. 3) is similarly disposed in the opposite side of the block 206 to face the diode across the slot. The block 206 is indexed and affixed to the frame so as to position the diode and transistor at the radial position of the apertures 202 in the disc 66. In this way an electrical signal is produced by the transistor 69 as each aperture 202 moves between the diode 68 and the transistor 69. This signal is introduced through leads to the gates 74 and 75 and to the counters 76 and 77. These digital signals represent progressive increments in the price of the product dispensed by the dispenser.

The light-emitting diode 68 and the transistor 69 are schematically shown in FIG. 7 as 68a" and 69a for the encoder 48 (FIG. 1) to distinguish them from corresponding elements shown in FIG. 3 for the gal|ons" encoder 50. The diode 68a and the transistor 69a are shown in FIG. 7 as being enclosed within a box 216 in broken lines, this box corresponding to the block 206 shown in FIGS. 5 and 6 and described above. Similarly, a diode 68b and a transistor 69b are associated with each other in a relationship corresponding to the diode 68a and the transistor 69a to produce signals corresponding to increments in the volume (gallons) of the fluid dispensed in an individual dispenser.

The diodes 68a and 68b are adapted to receive voltage from a full-wave rectifier formed in part by a pair of diodes 222 and 224 and the secondary winding of a shielded transformer 226. The primary winding of the transformer 226 is connected to receive an alternating voltage such as 115 volts from a commercial source. The transformer 226 is constructed (or shielded) to make certain that short circuits can never be produced between the primary and secondary windings of the transformer, thereby preventing undesirable voltages from being introduced to the elements 68a, 68b, 69a and 69b. Thus the transformer is one protective element in this intrinsically safe (from vapor ignition), low energy circuit.

The anodes of the diodes 222 and 224 are connected to the end terminals of the secondary winding of the transformer 226 and the cathodes are connected to a resistance 228 and capacitances 230 included in the full-wave rectifier. Second terminals of the resistance 228 and the capacitances 230 are connected to the center tap of the secondary winding of the transformer. Connections are made from the cathodes of the diodes 222 and 224 to first terminals of resistances 232, 234, 236 and 238, second terminals of which are respectfully connected to first terminals of the diode 68a, the diode 68b, the transistor 69a and the transistor 69b. Second terminals of the transistors 69a and 69b are respectively connected to output leads through resistances 240 and 242. All resistances 232, 234, 235, 238, 240 and 242 are protective elements and are included in the circuit to limit the electrical energy entering hazardous area 223 of the dispenser to intrinsically safe levels (non-ignition of flammable vapors).

Second terminals of the diodes 68a and 68b are connected to the collector of a transistor 244, the emitter of which is grounded and the base of which is connected to one terminal of the transistor 246. A second terminal of the transistor 246 is connected through a resistance 248 to the cathodes of the diodes 222 and 224. The transistor 246 is associated with a light-emitting diode 248, one terminal of which is grounded and the other terminal of which is connected through a 16 resistance 250 to receive a positive voltage of relatively low magnitude such as approximately +5V.

A positive voltage of relatively low magnitude is introduced through the resistance 250 to the diode 248 when an in use" signal is produced. This causes the transistor 246 to become conductive so that a positive voltage is introduced to the base of the transistor 244. This positive voltage causes the transistor 244 to become conductive so that a ground potential is effectively introduced to the diodes 68a and 68b, and causes the diodes to emit light. As flow of product thru the dispenser causes successive apertures 202 in the disc 66 to move between the diode 68a and the transistor 69a, the photo-sensitive transistor 69a detects the resulting intermittent light beams. The transistor 69a in turn becomes intermittently conductive and passes the signals for the dollars count through the resistor 240. In like manner and simultaneously, the transistor 69b passes signals through the resistor 242 when the diode 68b becomes conductive and with rotation of disc 67 to indicate increments in the volume (gallons) of the fluid dispensed for the individual dispenser. The circuitry shown in FIG. 7 may be considered to correspond to the diodes 68, the transistors 69 and the pulser drivers 70 and 71 in FIG. 3.

The signals passing through the resistor 240 are introduced in FIG. 3 to a pulse shaper 72 which is shown in some detail in FIG. 9. The resistor 240 in FIG. 7 is also indicated in FIG. 9 to show that the electrical signals representing increments in the dollar amount of the product dispensed by an individual dispenser is introduced to the base of a transistor 250 and to first terminals of a parallel network formed by a resistor 252 and a capacitor 254, the other terminals of which are grounded. The transistor 250 is included in a differential amplifier with a transistor 256. The emitters of the transistors 250 and 256 have a common connection with one terminal of a resistor 258, the second terminal of which is grounded. The base of the transistor 256 is connected to one terminal of a resistor 260, the second terminal of the resistor being grounded.

The collectors of the transistors 250 and 256 respectively receive positive voltage through resistors 262 and 264 from a source providing a positive voltage of low magnitude, such as approximately +5V. Signals on the collector of the transistor 256 are also introduced through a coupling capacitor 266 to the base of a transistor 268. A positive potential of relatively low magnitude is also introduced to the base of the transistor 268 through a resistor 270. The emitter of the transistor 268 is grounded and the collector of the transistor 268 has positive potential applied to it through a resistor 272. The signals on the collector of the transistor 268 are introduced to one terminal of NAND network 274 having another terminal connected to a line 276 to receive the in use" signals.

The transistor 256 is normally conductive and the transistor 250 is normally nonconductive. When the transistor 69a in FIG. 7 becomes conductive to indicate an increment in the dollar amount of the product dispensed by the individual dispenser, it causes a positive signal to be introduced through'the resistor 240 to the base of the transistor 250 in FIG. 9. This causes the transistor 250 to become conductive. The resultant decrease in the potential on the collector of the transistor 250 is introduced to the base of the transistor 256 to make the transistor 256 nonconductive. By way of illustration, the transistor 250 becomes conductive and the transistor 256 becomes nonconductive when a signal having an amplitude of at least approximately 3.4 volts is introduced to the base of the transistor 250.

The resistor 262 has a considerably greater value than the resistor 264. Because of this, the voltage produced on the emitter of the transistor 250 during the conductivity of this transistor is closer to ground potential than the voltage produced on the emitter of the transistor 256 while it is conducting. As a result, the transistor 250 remains conductive even when the voltage introduced to the base of the transistor falls considerably below a potential of approximately 3.4 volts. This prevents spurious signals passing through the resistor 240 to the base of the transistor 250 from triggering the transistor 250 to a state of nonconductivity. By way of illustration, the transistor 250 becomes triggered to a state of nonconductivity only when the voltage introduced to the base of the transistor falls below a value of approximately 0.9 volts.

By preventing the transistor 250 from being triggered to a state of nonconductivity until the voltage on the base of the transistor has fallen to a level considerably lower than that required to trigger the transistor to a state of conductivity, the transistor 250 is made insensitive to spurious signals such as noise signals. In this way, the transistor 250 responds only to large signals representing increments in the dollar amount of the product dispensed by the individual dispenser. The effective hysteresis also prevents undesirable extra signals from being generated from mechanical vibrations and slight reverse motions of the disk when otherwise in a static condition near one of the signal threshhold levels.

Every time that the transistor 250 is triggered to a state of conductivity and is then triggered to a state of nonconductivity, the transistor 256 becomes alternately nonconductive and conductive. When the transistor 256 becomes conductive, a relatively low potential is introduced from the collector of the transistor 256 to the base of the transistor 268. This causes the transistor 268 to become nonconductive so that a relatively high potential is introduced to the NAND network 274. The NAND" network 274 then passes this signal provided that a positive voltage is produced on the line 276 to indicate that the dispenser is in use.

Therefore, when the in-use condition exists, each successive cycle of triggering the transistor 250 in sequence to a state of conductivity and then a state of nonconductivity produces one incremental count in the dollar amount of the product dispensed by the individual dispenser. Similar circuitry to that shown in FIG. 9 is provided and is operative to produce signals from transistor 68b through resistor 242 representing increments in the volume (gallons) of product dispensed for the individual dispenser. Typically, the increment for the amount of fluid dispensed is 0.0] gallon and the monetary increment is 0.001 dollar.

FIG. 8 illustrates in some detail the construction of the photocoupler 86, the delay circuit 88, the triac gate 92, the photocoupler isolator 94 and the triac switch 96 in FIG. 3. In FIG. 8, the "in use signal is introduced to the photocoupler 86 also shown in FIG. 3. The resultant signal produced by the transistor in the photocoupler is amplified in stages which include transistors 280, 282, 284 and 286. A delay indicated in block form at 88 in FIG. 3 is provided at the output of the stage including the transistor 282 by including a resistor 288 and a capacitor 290 in series and connecting the common terminal between the resistor 288 and the capacitor 290 to the collector of the transistor 282 and the base of the transistor 284. As previously described, this delay in dropping the in-use" condition, and the associated pulse counting capability is desirable to make certain that a user does not obtain a small amount of free (uncounted) product (in the order of 2 or 3 cents worth) after he turns off the pump in the dispenser. However, the delay provided by the resistor 288 and the capacitor 290 is sufficiently short so as to prevent the dispenser user from turning off the dispenser to reset the dials to zero, and then restarting to dispense product again before the in-use condition is lost.

The output signal on the collector of the transistor 286 is introduced to a cathode of a diode 292 which is included in an AND" network with a diode 294. The cathode of the diode 294 is connected to receive the ready" (complement of ready) signal from the ready flip-flop in FIG. 3. The AND" network formed by the diodes 292 and 294 produces a low voltage when either an m use signal is not introduced to the diode 292 or a ready" signal is not introduced to the diode 294. At such times as an in use" signal and a ready signal are simultaneously being produced, a high voltage is obtained from the anodes of the diodes.

The voltage on the anodes of the diodes 292 and 294 is introduced to the base of a transistor 296 which is included in an NOR" network with a transistor 298. The emitters of the transistors 296 and 298 are grounded and the base of the transistor 298 is connected to receive the "emergency stop signal. The collectors of the diodes 296 and 298 are connected to the light-emitting diode in the photocoupler isolator 94 also illustrated in FIG. 3.

The "AND" network formed by the diodes 292 and 294 and the NOR network formed by the transistors 296 and 298 correspond to the triac gate 92 in FIG. 3. As previously described, a low voltage is produced on the anodes of the diodes 292 and 294 when either an "in use signal or a ready" signal is produced. This low voltage is introduced to the base of the transistor 296 to turn off the transistor. The transistor 298 is also turned off when an emergency stop" signal is not being introduced to the base of the transistor 298. Under these conditions, a high voltage is produced on the collectors of the transistors 296 and 298 to make the diode in the photocoupler isolator 94 conductive. This in turn causes a silicon-controlled rectifier 94a in the isolator 94 to become conductive.

When a voltage is produced in the silicon-controlled rectifier 94a, it causes a positive voltage to be produced in a diode bridge 300. This positive voltage in turn causes a switch formed by a back-to-back relationship of two silicon-controlled rectifiers to become conductive. This switch is designated as the triac switch 96 in FIG. 3. When the switch 302 becomes conductive, it causes the ground path to be completed to the reset motor and the relay coil which activates the submerged pump motor for supplying the product from the stored tanks. Power is not applied to the reset motor until switch 46 is activated to turn the dispenser on to dispense product.

The novel functions provided by the apparatus and method of this invention allow complete control of dispensers at a self-service station, with storing of data in such a way that accuracy can be checked by a home office, and the accounting function performed with automated data. Prior to or during a transaction, the sales data from the previous sale on each dispenser can be recalled and displayed. Reset of a dispenser is inhibited while the dispenser is in use. Additional data can be entered manually by the station operator, electronically by the home office. Automatically acquired digital data received from tank inventory gauges can be received, displayed, stored in memory with continual updating, and transmitted by telephone. As will be apparent to those skilled in the art, many other advantageous results are realized from the apparatus and method of this invention.

The preferred embodiments of the apparatus of this invention have been described as utilizing conventional integrated and micro-computer circuits, and other apparatus suitable for use therewith, as well known in the art. However, those skilled in the art will appreciate that different micro-computer programs, logic systems, other types of circuits and different apparatus may be substituted without departing from the scope of the invention. The invention is not limited, therefore, to the specific embodiments shown and described, but only as defined by the appended claims.

We claim:

1. In a self-service gasoline station having a station operator for controlling the operation of the station comprising a plurality of gasoline dispensers and a plurality of gasoline storage tanks connected to dispense gasoline in individual transactions by means of each of said dispensers said dispensers being provided with visual indicators of volume and dollar amount of each such transaction, a dispenser control and data system which comprises a data storage device having a first plurality of addresses corresponding to the number of dispensers in the plurality,

means responsive to the dispensing of gasoline by each dispenser in each individual transaction to produce in the corresponding address signals indicative of the volume and dollar amount of liquid dispensed in that individual transaction,

means responsive to signals indicating the level or volume of gasoline remaining in each storage tank to receive signals indicative of such remaining volume of gasoline,

means for displaying and transferring data indicative of such level or volume to an individual address in said data storage device different from the addresses in the first plurality,

display means displaced from the gasoline dispensers and constructed to provide a visual display of the volume and dollar amount of liquid dispensed in an individual dispenser in an individual transaction, and

means operable by the station operator for interrogating individual data storage addresses in the first plurality to obtain a generation by the display means of displays representative of the volume and dollar amount of liquid dispensed in the individual dispenser in the individual transaction.

2. ln a self-service gasoline station as defined by claim 1, the improvement comprising the data storage device having a second plurality of addresses different from the addresses in the first plurality,

means for adding the data sorted in each address in the first plurality to represent the volume and dollar amount of liquid dispensed by each individual dispenser in an individual transaction to data stored in a corresponding address in the second plurality to obtain in the corresponding address in the second plurality a cumulative volume and dollar amount of the liquid dispensed by such individual dispenser.

3. In a self-service gasoline station as defined by claim 2, the improvement which comprises means for selectively recording in another address in the storage device the accumulated amount resulting from said adding of data for the successive transactions for all of such individual dispenser and means for transmitting to a central station the accumulated amount recorded in such other address to represent the cumulative volume and dollar amount for all of the dispensers in all of the transactions in such dispensers.

4. In a self-service gasoline station as defined by claim 2, the improvement comprising a communications interface connected to said data storate device,

home office communication means operable to interrogate said data storage device via said communications interface, and

means for interrupting the transfer of information from the data storage device to the home office communications means upon the occurrence of a display on the display means of information in one of the addresses in the data storage device.

5. In a self-service gasoline station as defined by claim 4, the improvement which comprises means at the station operable to isolate the data storage device electrically from the storage tank.

6. In a self-service gasoline station as defined by claim 1, the improvement comprising the data storage having a second plurality of addresses corresponding to the number of dispensers in the plurality, the addresses in the second plurality being different from the addresses in the first plurality,

means for providing for a transfer from one of the addresses in the first plurality to a corresponding one of the addresses in the second plurality of volume and dollar amount of liquid stored in the address in the first plurality for each individual one of the dispensers upon the completion of an individual transaction in that dispenser, and

means for providing for a display in the display means of the data representing the dollar and volume amount of liquid stored in the address for any individual one of the dispensers while liquid in a successive transaction is being dispensed from such individual dispenser and the volume and dollar amount of such transaction is being stored in the address in the first plurality for that individual dispenser.

7. In combination for use in a self-service station for dispensing an energy fluid stored in tanks at the selfservice station,

a plurality of dispensers operably coupled to the tanks for dispensing the fluid on a controlled basis from the tanks, each of the dispensers including a switch having first and second positions and further including a plurality of first means each associated with an individual one of the dispensers and movable from initial positions to different positions to count and indicate the quantity of fluid dispensed 21 by such individual dispenser in each individual transaction and including a plurality of second means each associated with an individual one of the dispensers and movable from initial positions to different positions to count and indicate the monetary value of the fluid dispensed by such individual dispenser, each of the first means in the plurality and each of the second means in the plurality being resettable to the initial positions, plurality of third means each associated with an individual one of the dispensers and operative upon the resetting of the first and second means to the initial positions for such individual dispenser and operative upon the positioning of the switch in the first position for providing an in use signal for such individual dispenser, plurality of fourth means each associated with an individual one of the dispensers and operative upon the introduction of the in use signal from the third means and the dispensing of fluid from such individual dispenser for providing electrical signals representing the amount of fluid dispensed by such individual dispenser, plurality of fifth means each associated with an individual one of the dispensers and operative upon the introduction of the in use" signal from the third means for the individual dispenser and the dispensing of fluid from such individual dispenser for providing electrical signals representing the monetary value of the fluid dispensed by such individual dispenser,

sixth means including a console having characteristics for storing information as to the operation of each of the individual dispensers in the self-service station, the console having characteristics for storing for each individual dispenser the cumulative amount of energy dispensed by such individual dispenser in the previous transaction while such energy fluid is being dispensed from such individual dispenser in the next transaction, the sixth means including seventh means for visually indicating for any individual one of the dispensers information stored in the console for such individual dispenser and further including a keyboard for selecting the individual dispenser to have its information visually displayed,

eighth means operatively coupled to the console and responsive to the signals from the fourth and fifth means for each individual dispenser for determining the cumulative value of the signals from the fourth means for each individual transaction for that individual dispenser and the cumulative value of the signals from the fifth means for each individual transaction for that individual dispenser and for storing such determinations in the sixth means for display by the seventh means, and

ninth means operatively coupled to the sixth means and to the seventh means for providing an individual display of the information stored in the sixth means for each individual dispenser in accordance with the operation of the keyboard, the ninth means having characteristics for providing for the display for each individual dispenser of the information for the previous transaction for such individual dispenser while energy fluid is being dispensed for the next transaction from such individual dispenser.

8. The combination set forth in claim 7, including means responsive to the in use" signal from the fourth means for each individual dispenser for visually indicating that such individual dispenser is in use.

9. The combination set forth in claim 7 wherein the fourth means for each individual dispenser is in electrically isolated relationship with the third means for such individual dispenser but is operatively coupled to the third means for such individual dispenser to become operative for producing the electrical signals representing the amount of fluid dispensed by such individual dispenser and wherein the fifth means for each individual dispenser is in electrically isolated relationship with the third means for such individual dispenser but is operatively coupled to the third means for such individual dispenser to become operative for pr0- ducing the electrical signals representing the amount of fluid dispensed by such individual dispenser.

10. The combination set forth in claim 9 wherein first photocoupler means are provided for electrically isolating the fourth means for each individual dispenser from the third means for such individual dispenser and wherein second photocoupler means are provided for electrically isolating the fifth means for each individual dispenser from the third means for such individual dispenser.

11. The combination set forth in claim 9 wherein the fourth means for each individual dispenser is constructed to be non-responsive to electrical noise signals and to mechanical vibration and to produce signals only in response to signals representing the amount of fluid dispensed by such individual dispenser and the fifth means for each individual dispenser is constructed to be non-responsive to electrical noise signals and to mechanical vibration and to produce signals only in response to signals representing the monetary value of the fluid dispensed by such individual dispenser.

12. The combination set forth in claim 11 wherein the eighth means is constructed to determine the cumulative amount of fluid dispensed by each individual dispenser through a succession of transactions and to determine the cumulative monetary value of the fluid dispensed by such individual dispenser through the succession of transactions and to provide for the display of such cumulative information from such individual dispenser by the seventh means.

13. In combination for use in a self-service station for dispensing an energy fluid stored in tanks at the selfservice station and for indicating such fluid dispensing at a central position at the station,

a plurality of dispensers operably coupled to the tanks for dispensing the fluid on a controlled basis from the tanks, each of the dispensers including a switch having first and second positions,

a plurality of first means each operably coupled to an individual one of the dispensers for counting and indicating the amount of fluid dispensed by such individual dispenser,

a plurality of second means each operably coupled to an individual one of the dispensers for counting and indicating the monetary value of the fluid dispensed by such individual dispenser,

third means operative upon the positioning of the switch for an individual one of the dispensers to the first position for enabling the resetting of the first means and the second means for such individual dispenser to an initial value,

fourth means operative upon the positioning of the switch for an individual one of the dispensers to the second position for providing for the dispensing of the fluid by such individual dispenser and for the operation of the associated ones of the first and second means for such individual dispenser in accordance with such dispensing of fluid,

fifth means operative upon the production of the indications provided by the individual ones of the first and second means for each individual dispenser for providing for the transmission of such indications, with intrinsic safety for hazardous locations, to the central position,

sixth means operative upon the production of the indications transmitted by the fifth means for each individual dispenser to the central position at the self-service station for storing at the central position information relating to the cumulative amount of fluid dispensed for such individual dispenser since the last operation of the switch for such individual dispenser to the second position and further relating to the cumulative amount of such fluid dispensed,

seventh means operative upon the production of the indications stored by the sixth means for each individual dispenser for providing visual indications of the cumulative amount of the fluid dispensed for each of the dispensers in the plurality and the cumulative monetary value of such fluid dispensed for each individual dispenser in the plurality,

eighth means operative upon the sixth and seventh means for providing for a selection of an individual one of the dispensers and a visual display by the seventh means of the amount of the fluid dispensed by the selected one of the dispensers and the cumulative value of the fluid dispensed by such selected dispenser, and

ninth means operative upon the third and fourth means for obtaining a resetting of the counter means in each individual dispenser after an individual transaction and a dispensing of the energy fluid by such individual dispenser in a subsequent transaction while the seventh means are operative to provide a visual indication of the energy fluid dispensed from such individual dispenser in such individual transaction and the monetary value of the fluid dispensed from such individual dispenser in such individual transaction.

14. The combination set forth in claim 13, including,

emergency stop means operative to interrupt temporarily the dispensing of the energy fluid by all of the dispensers in the plurality and for retaining the information stored by the sixth means for all of such dispensers, and

tenth means operative upon the sixth and seventh means for providing at any one time for the visual indication by the seventh means of the cumulative amount of fluid dispensed by an individual dispenser in a previous transaction and the cumulative value of such fluid dispensed by such individual dispenser in such previous transaction while such individual fluid is dispensing fluid in a successive transaction and for providing at any one time for the visual indication by the seventh means of the cumulative amount of fluid dispensed by an individual dispenser in a previous transaction and the cumulative value of the fluid dispensed in such individual transaction even while the dispensing of the fluid by all of the dispensers is interrupted by the emergency stop means.

15. The combination set forth in claim 13, including,

eleventh means operative upon the third and fourth means for obtaining a resetting of the counter means in each individual dispenser and a dispensing of the energy fluid by such individual dispenser in a subsequent transaction while the tenth means are operative to provide a visual indication of the energy fluid dispensed from such individual dispenser in the individual transaction.

16. The combination set forth in claim 13 for use with telephone lines, including,

a central station operably coupled to the central position at the self-service station through the telephone lines for transmission of information between the central station and the central position at the self-service station,

the sixth means including means for storing special information relating to the cumulative amount of the fluid dispensed by each individual dispenser in the successive transactions, and

means for providing for the transmission of the special information from the central position at the self-service station to the central station.

17. The combination set forth in claim 16, including tenth means operative upon the sixth and seventh means for providing at any one time for the visual indication by the seventh means of the cumulative amount of fluid dispensed by an individual dispenser in a previous transaction and the cumulative value of such fluid dispensed in such transaction while such individual dispenser is dispensing fluid in a successive transaction, and

means for interrupting the transmission of the special information from the central position at the selfservice station to the central station for a limited period of time upon the operation of the seventh means in displaying visual indications or upon the operation of the third means in resetting the first means and the second means for any one of the individual dispensers.

18. The combination set forth in claim 13, including,

tenth means operative upon the sixth and seventh means for providing at any one time for the visual indication by the seventh means of the cumulative amount of fluid dispensed by an individual dispenser in a previous transaction and the cumulative value of such fluid dispensed in such transaction while such individual dispenser is dispensing fluid in a successive transaction.

19. The combination set forth in claim 18, including,

means for preventing the indications stored in the sixth means for the fluid dispensed and the value of such dispensed fluid in the successive transaction then taking place from being lost from the sixth means during such successive transaction even upon the operation of the third means for the individual dispenser during such successive transaction.

20. The combination set forth in claim 18, including,

means for providing a fail safe electrical isolation between the electrical signals produced at the dispensers and the electrical signals produced at the central position at the self-service station.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2084548 *Mar 17, 1934Jun 22, 1937John TaylerGasoline distributing system
US3130870 *Mar 30, 1961Apr 28, 1964British Petroleum CoMetering system
US3220606 *Jul 31, 1962Nov 30, 1965Gilbert & Barker Mfg CoRemote counter and control therefor particularly adapted for liquid dispensing units
US3498501 *Mar 1, 1968Mar 3, 1970Tokheim CorpDispensing control system
US3593883 *Mar 28, 1969Jul 20, 1971Tokheim CorpAutomatic dispensing apparatus
US3705385 *Dec 10, 1969Dec 5, 1972Northern Illinois Gas CoRemote meter reading system
US3731777 *Jul 26, 1971May 8, 1973Pan NovaCoin operated fluid dispenser
US3786423 *Jan 24, 1972Jan 15, 1974Northern Illinois Gas CoApparatus for cumulatively storing and remotely reading a meter
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4101056 *Jul 8, 1976Jul 18, 1978George E. MattimoeTemperature-compensating petroleum product dispensing unit
US4107777 *Jun 13, 1977Aug 15, 1978Anthes Imperial LimitedDispensing system
US4143283 *Jan 17, 1978Mar 6, 1979General Atomic CompanyBattery backup system
US4162027 *Jan 24, 1978Jul 24, 1979Datacon, Inc.Remote readout device for a pump
US4186381 *Jul 24, 1978Jan 29, 1980Veeder Industries Inc.Gasoline station registration and control system
US4216529 *Jan 17, 1978Aug 5, 1980General Atomic CompanyFluid dispensing control system
US4247899 *Jan 10, 1979Jan 27, 1981Veeder Industries Inc.Fuel delivery control and registration system
US4252253 *Feb 21, 1978Feb 24, 1981Mcneil CorporationDrink dispenser having central control of plural dispensing stations
US4262287 *Sep 24, 1979Apr 14, 1981John McLoughlinAutomatic scan flow meter means
US4275382 *Jul 18, 1979Jun 23, 1981Jannotta Louis JApparatus for monitoring and controlling vessels containing liquid
US4335809 *Jan 29, 1980Jun 22, 1982Barcrest LimitedEntertainment machines
US4349882 *Aug 22, 1980Sep 14, 1982Veeder Industries Inc.Liquid level measuring system
US5018645 *Jan 30, 1990May 28, 1991Zinsmeyer Herbert GAutomotive fluids dispensing and blending system
US5193111 *Jan 6, 1992Mar 9, 1993Abb Power T&D CompanyAutomated data transmission system
US5340969 *Oct 1, 1991Aug 23, 1994Dresser Industries, Inc.Method and apparatus for approving transaction card based transactions
US5612890 *May 19, 1995Mar 18, 1997F C Systems, Inc.System and method for controlling product dispensation utilizing metered valve apparatus and electronic interconnection map corresponding to plumbing interconnections
US5722469 *Oct 18, 1996Mar 3, 1998Tuminaro; PatrickFuel verification and dispensing system
US6442448Jun 4, 1999Aug 27, 2002Radiant Systems, Inc.Fuel dispensing home phone network alliance (home PNA) based system
US6470288 *Jun 18, 1999Oct 22, 2002Tokheim CorporationDispenser with updatable diagnostic system
US7064314Jun 22, 2001Jun 20, 2006Jerome PooleConcrete-dispensing counter for ready mix trucks
US7158918Sep 10, 2001Jan 2, 2007Bunn-O-Matic CorporationMachine performance monitoring system and billing method
US7162391Mar 15, 2005Jan 9, 2007Bunn-O-Matic CorporationRemote beverage equipment monitoring and control system and method
US7478050 *Jan 4, 1999Jan 13, 2009Fujitsu LimitedSystem for managing resources used among groups
US7904357May 21, 2001Mar 8, 2011Bunn-O-Matic CorporationSystem, method and apparatus for monitoring and billing food preparation equipment and product
US8170834Mar 10, 2006May 1, 2012Bunn-O-Matic CorporationRemote beverage equipment monitoring and control system and method
WO1984003488A1 *Oct 20, 1983Sep 13, 1984Cypher SystemsOil field lease management and security system and method therefor
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/26, 340/10.6, 340/3.71, 705/413, 377/21, 222/32, 379/106.3, 340/5.9
International ClassificationG01F13/00, G07F15/00, B67D7/22, B67D7/24, B67D7/78
Cooperative ClassificationB67D7/228, G06Q50/06
European ClassificationG06Q50/06, B67D7/22C4B