Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3927805 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 23, 1975
Filing dateOct 15, 1973
Priority dateOct 15, 1973
Also published asCA1025397A1
Publication numberUS 3927805 A, US 3927805A, US-A-3927805, US3927805 A, US3927805A
InventorsStull Morton B
Original AssigneeStull Morton B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tilt/lift safety closure
US 3927805 A
Abstract
A safety cap construction for hand-held dispensers comprising a tubular cap body having a top discharge opening and a closure cap held captive thereon by a hinge-like web structure which enables the cap to be swung from a closed, sealing position to an open, discharging position. Cooperable sealing beads are provided on the cap and on an upstanding spout disposed in the upper surface of the cap body. The sealing beads constitute a yieldable detent to maintain the cap in the closed, sealing position. An upstanding flange on the cap body extends at least partially around the cap and covers the juncture of the latter and the cap body, thus normally barring access to the crack or joint therebetween and preventing the cap from being directly pryed off by unauthorized personnel. The cap has a lifting edge which, in the closed position, is hidden by the upstanding flange. A rib on the cap underside engages the spout and enables limited rocking movement of the cap with respect to the body. The arrangement is such that the user merely applies a depressing force to a designated area of the cap, causing it to pivot or rock on its rib. In turn, the detent or sealing beads yield at one location, and the lifting edge of the cap is raised above the upstanding flange on the cap body, providing a widened crack which enables the user to now easily engage the edge with his finger and thus pry off the cap.
Images(5)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Stull Dec. 23, 1975 TILT/LIFT SAFETY CLOSURE [76] Inventor: Morton B. Stull, 221-223 Banta Ave, Garfield, NJ. 07026 [22] Filed: Oct. 15, 1973 [2]] Appl. No.: 406,671

[52] US. Cl. 222/153; 215/211; 215/238; 215/305; 222/556 [5]] Int. B67D 5/32 [58] Field of Search 215/9, 211, 216, 224, 235, 215/236, 237, 238, 244, 245, 301, 305, 317,

Primary Examiner-Robert B. Reeves Assistant Eraminerl ,arry H. Martin Attorney, Agent, or Firm-H. Gibner behmann; K. Gibner Lehmann ABSTRACT A safety cap construction for hand-held dispensers comprising a tubular cap body having a top discharge opening and a closure cap held captive thereon by a hinge-like web structure which enables the cap to be swung from a closed, sealing position to an open, discharging position. Cooperable sealing beads are provided on the cap and on an upstanding spout disposed in the upper surface of the cap body. The sealing beads constitute a yieldable detent to maintain the cap in the closed, sealing position. An upstanding flange on the cap body extends at least partially around the cap and covers the juncture of the latter and the cap body, thus normally barring access to the crack or joint therebetween and preventing the cap from being directly pryed off by unauthorized personnel. The cap has a lifting edge which, in the closed position, is hidden by the upstanding flange. A rib on the cap underside engages the spout and enables limited rocking movement of the cap with respect to the body. The arrangement is such that the user merely applies a depressing force to a designated area of the cap, causing it to pivot or rock on its rib. In turn, the detent or sealing beads yield at one location, and the lifting edge of the cap is raised above the upstanding flange on the cap body, providing a widened crack which enables the user to now easily engage the edge with his finger and thus pry off the cap.

23 Claims, 21 Drawing Figures U.S. Patent Dec. 23, 1975 Sheet 1 of5 3,927,805

US. Patent Dec. 23, 1975 Sheet 2 of5 3,927,805

U.S. Patent Dec. 23, 1975 Sheet 3 of5 3,927,805

W m I I Gum I a I 0/ IL, llll F WI m 1 I c 4 5 5 m a 0 M m 401/ I m 1 2 W Md m /0 6 au l IIZ Sheet 4 of 5 3,927,805

US. Patent Dec. 23, 1975 US. Patent Dec. 23, 1975 Sheet 5 of5 3,927,805

TILT/LIFT SAFETY CLOSURE BACKGROUND This invention relates generally to safety closures. and more particularly to closures of the type which are maintained in a locked position and require the performance of a certain simple operation by a knowledgeable or authorized person in order to effect the unlocking.

In the past, a number of safety cap constructions have been proposed. Some employed merely a tight-fitting cap having a small finger-engageable tab for enabling application of a reasonable prying force by the user. Others incorporated caps which were keyed to the container neck, wherein rotation of the cap was required to bring into registration one or more marker arrows prior to opening. Still others employed a cap having a smooth exterior surface which closely abutted an adjoining surface on the cap body or container neck, thus presenting only a very small crack at the juncture thereof; this hindered direct removal of the cap by a small child or unauthorized person. The above safety closures had a number of disadvantages. Many were unsatisfactory in that for the average consumer, they presented too great a difficulty in opening the container. Others were too easily opened, with the result that the caps did not prevent access by unauthorized personnel, and thus did not function as true safety closures. In certain cases as where the cap was not held captive, it would frequently become lost or misplaced during use of the container, in which case the safety function of the cap was completely defeated.

SUMMARY The above drawbacks and disadvantages of prior safety closures are obviated by the present invention which has for an object the provision of a novel and improved safety cap its structure which is simple in construction, reliable in operation and which at the same time represents a practical solution to the problem of providing a closure which can be easily opened by the average consumer while nevertheless presenting great difficulty to unauthorized persons such as small children. Another object is the provision of a safety closure which can be readily molded as a single piece in simple mold cavities.

These objects are accomplished by the provision of a safety cap construction comprising a tubular cap body having a top discharge opening, and closure cap held captive thereon by a flexible hinge web structure. The cap body has an upstanding spout with an external detent and sealing bead which is engage-able with a corresponding bead on the underside of the cap, the beads tending to hold the cap in a closed, sealing position on the cap body. The closure cap has a lifting edge on its underside, which is hidden by an upstanding flange on the cap body. A pivot rib on the underside of the cap is engageable with a bearing surface on the spout, and limited pivotal or rocking movement of the cap in its sealing, closed position can be effected by depressing a designated point thereon. The arrangement is such that upon the application of such a depressing force, the cap tilts slightly, exposing the lifting edge thereof above the upstanding flange. This enables engagement of the edge by the finger of the user and permits the removal of the cap.

Other features and advantages will hereinafter appear.

In the drawings, illustrating several embodiments of the invention:

FIG. l is a vertical view of a container employing the safety cap construction of the present invention, shown in the open or product-discharging position.

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of the safety cap construction of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a bottom plan view of the safety cap construction of FIGS. 1 and 2.

FIG. 4 is a vertical section of the safety cap construction of FIGS. l3, shown in the closed, sealing position.

FIG. 5 is a vertical section like that of FIG. 4, except showing the closure cap being depressed adjacent the location of the hinge web structure and thereafter being lifted at its opposite edge by the fingers of the user.

FIG. 6 is a top plan view of a modified safety cap construction, showing an off-center pivot rib on the underside of the closure cap, this construction constituting another embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 7 is a side elevational view of the cap construction of FIG. 6, showing the closure cap being depressed adjacent the hinge web structure.

FIG. 8 is a top plan view of a further modified safety cap construction, incorporating reinforcing lands on the upstanding spout portion of the cap body, this construction constituting yet another embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 9 is a front elevational view of a still further modified safety cap construction, showing that part of the upstanding flange disposed between the posts being disconnected therefrom, and being capable of undergoing limited inward flexing movement, this construction constituting yet another embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 10 is a vertical sectional view of the safety cap construction of FIG. 9, showing the cap being depressed adjacent the location of the hinge web structure and thereafter lifted at its opposite edge by the fingers of the user.

FIG. 11 is a top plan view of the safety cap construction of FIGS. 9 and 10.

FIG. 12 is a top plan view of a further modified safety cap construction, showing part of the upstanding flange between the posts on the cap body disposed inwardly of other flange portions, this construction constituting still another embodiment of the invention.

FIG. I3 is a front elevational view of the safety cap construction of FIG. 12.

FIG. I4 is a top plan view ofa further modified safety cap construction, showing a detent bead on the underside of the cap, the bead having a portion of a reduced cross-sectional area, this construction constituting still another embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 15 is a section taken on line I5-l5 of FIG. 14.

FIG. 16 is a section taken on line 16-I6 of FIG. I4.

FIG. 17 is a top plan view of a still further modified safety cap construction, showing a guide bead on the closure cap for facilitating replacement thereof on the cap body, this construction constituting yet another embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 18 is a section taken on line I8-l8 of FIG. 17.

FIG. I9 is a section taken on line l919 of FIG. 17.

FIG. 20 is a side elevational view of a further modified cap construction incorporating two upstanding posts on the cap body disposed on opposite sides of the hinge web structure, the posts preventing engagement of the hinge web by the teeth of a small child, this construction constituting yet another embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 21 is a top plan view of the closure cap construction of FIG. 20.

FIG. 22 is a bottom plan view of the closure construction of FIG. 20.

FIG. 23 is a top plan view of a cap construction having its stopper in the open position, illustrating still another embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 24 is a top plan view of the cap construction of FIG. 23, with the stopper in the closed or sealing position.

FIG. 25 is a side elevational view of the tion of FIGS. 23 and 24, position.

FIG. 26 is a fragmentary section taken on line 2626 of FIG. 23.

FIG. 27 is a section similar to FIG. 26, except showing the cap disposed in a tilted position.

Referring first to FIGS. 1-5 there is illustrated a safety cap construction generally designated by the numeral 10, for use with a container [2 of the handheld type adapted to dispense a liquid product. The cap construction comprises a tubular cap body I4 having an external annular groove 16 by which the body can be snapped into and permanently held on the container as illustrated in FIG. 1, and a closure cap 18 held captive on the cap body by means of a flexible hinge web structure 20. The cap 18 can be swung to a sealing, closed position illustrated in FIG. 4 from an open, or product-discharging position illustrated inFIG. 1. Disposed on the cap body 14 is an upstanding dispensing spout 22 having a central discharge aperture 24 which may be either a single opening or multiple openings, and may have varied characteristics depending upon the nature of the product being dispensed and upon the direction of discharge desired. For example, with the particular configuration shown in FIGS. l-S, the product is dispensed in a stream at an angle with respect to the longitudinal axis of the cap and container.

In accordance with the present invention, there is provided a novel safety cap construction comprising the combination of an upstanding flange 26 carried on the cap body 18 and extending at least partially around the juncture formed by the annular surfaces 28 and 30 of the closure cap 18 and cap body 14, respectively yieldable detent means on the cap body and cap for maintaining the latter in a closed, sealing position, and pivot bearing means on the cap body and cap enabling limited tilting or rocking movement of the latter in response to application of a depressing force applied to one side of the cap, as will be explained below. The upstanding spout 22 is generally rigid and has at its uppermost part a yieldable, external annular sealing bead 32 which is adapted to cooperate with a corresponding internal annular sealing bead 34 carried on a skirt 36 depending from the underside of the closure cap 18, the two beads sealingly engaging one another when the closure cap is in the closed position of FIG. 4 and thus constituting the yieldable detent means holding the closure cap firmly on the body. It will be readily understood that the domed surface 38 of the closure cap is smooth and devoid of any gripping protrusions and, when the cap is in the sealing position, there exists no point of access to the cap for directly prying off the same, due to the flange 26 which extends roughly up to the periphery of the domed surface 38.

cap

cap construcwith the stopper in the closed Referring particularly to FIG. 2, in accordance with the present invention, the upstanding spout has a raised upper bearing surface comprising oppositely disposed areas 39, 40 of the spout adjacent the location of the sealing bead 32. The closure cap 18 has a bearing rib 42 disposed on its underside, the rib being of such dimensions as to engage the areas 39, 40 when the cap is in the closed, sealing position of FIG. 4. As also illustrated in FIG. 1, there is a recess 44 on the cap body 14 between the spout 22 and the upstanding flange 26, the purpose of which is to provide a clearance space for the depending skirt 36 of the cap when the latter is tilted to the position of FIG. 5 during the opening procedure as will be explained below. Additional ribs 46 and 48 (FIG. 2) in the closure cap l8 provide stiffening therefor. Rib 46 also engages the upper bearing surface of the spout 22, to provide a seat for the cap in the closed position. It can be seen that the rib 48 is shorter than the others, and a space 50 exists in order to provide clearance for the portion 52 of the spout when the cap is tilted to the position of FIG. 5. A depending sealer plug 54 is received in the spout opening 24 when the cap is in the closed position to provide a secondary seal of the closure.

In accordance with the present invention, there is further provided on the underside of the closure cap 18 a normally inaccessible lifting edge 56 at a point substantially opposite the location of the hinge web structure 20. Referring to FIGS. 2 and 4, it can be seen that for the closed condition of the cap, this edge is located below the top edge of the upstanding flange 26 on the cap body and is not exposed, thus preventing direct engagement thereof by the fingers and unauthorized direct removal of the cap.

The operation of this embodiment of the invention can now be readily understood. With the cap 18 in the closed, sealing position of FIG. 4, it can be seen that the cap exterior presents a smooth, domed configuration substantially devoid of gripping protrusions. The cap is firmly held in this position by the engagement of the cooperable detent beads 32, 34. It is to be noted that the cap bearing rib 42 is in engagement with the surfaces 39, 40 (FIG. 2) of the spout. In order to effect removal of the cap, it is first necessary to apply a depressing force thereto adjacent the location of the hinge web structure 20 as illustrated in FIG. 5. The application of such a force will cause tilting or rocking of the cap as shown. The latter pivots on the bearing rib 42, and that portion of the depending skirt 36 adjacent the location of the hinge web structure occupies part of the space 44 on the cap body between the spout 22 and the upstanding flange 26. As the cap is tilted, the bead 34 thereof is forced past the bead 32 on the spout at the front of the cap (opposite the hinge) thus exposing the lifting edge 56 of the cap for engagement by the fingers of the user, as shown in FIG. 5. From this tilted position, the cap can be readily lifted by prying movement to the open, product-discharging position of FIG. I wherein the container is ready to use. Optionally, the cap may have a raised pressure portion 58 in the form of a spot on the domed surface 38 as shown in FIG. 3, to indicate to the user the location for applying the depressing force, but this is not necessary for proper operation of the closure. Following use of the dispenser, the cap I8 can be swung from the position of FIG. I to that of FIG. 4 directly, since more than adequate force can be applied to the cap to cause the detent beads 32, 34 to bypass one another during this closing operation. A series of upstanding lugs 59, shown in FIG. 2, engage the surface 28 (FIG. 2) of the cap and serve as a stop therefor when the cap is swung to the sealing, closed position. This prevents excessive force being applied to the cap and spout, thus preventing deformation thereof during the closing operation.

As best illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 4, the depending skirt 36 of the cap forms one wall of a V-groove 60. The skirt 36 is capable of flexing and thus facilitates the by-passing movement of the bead 34 and the spout bead 32. In the present construction, the spout bead is fairly rigid, and it will be understood that most of the flexing movement during by-pass of the beads occurs in a radially outward direction in this skirt 36. The V- groove 60 can extend entirely around the periphery of the cap 18, but I have found that it is desirable to partially fill in the groove immediately adjacent the point of connection of the hinge web structure 20. Since little or no flexing of the skirt 36 occurs here, no groove is necessary. The effect of the filled-in groove is to tend to make the cap 18 more rigid with respect to the web 20. This would be important where the initial depressing force was to be applied to the hinge instead of to the cap itself, as will be explained below.

FIG. 2 illustrates several additional features of the closure cap construction. Disposed on the cap body 14 near its periphery are the spaced-apart upstanding flanges 26, which extend on opposite sides of the hinge web structure 20. A part 64 of the flange 26 is disposed between two posts as illustrated. The posts 61, 62 function to prevent access to the upstanding flange part 64 by the teeth of a child. Although the flange is fairly rigid, I have found that a more substantial barrier is desirable to have at the front of the cap, and the posts adequately serve the above purpose.

Another embodiment of the invention is shown in FIGS. 6 and 7, illustrating a closure construction comprising a cap body 14 substantially identical in construction to that illustrated in the embodiment of FIGS. l-S, and a closure cap 64 held captive by a flexible hinge web structure 20. The cap body 14 comprises an upstanding spout 22 having a discharge opening 24, an external annular sealing bead 32 on the spout and upper bearing surfaces 39, 40 adjacent the location of the sealing bead. An upstanding flange 26 and posts 61, 62 operate in substantially the same manner as in the embodiment of FIGS. 1-5. The cap 64 comprises a depending skirt 66 having an annular internal sealing bead 68 which is sealingly engageable with the bead 32 to maintain the cap 64 in the closed, or sealing position. An elongate sealing plug 70 is receivable in the discharge opening 24 to provide a secondary seal as described in connection with the first-mentioned embodiment. With the exception of the ribs (to be discussed below) on the underside of the cap, the latter is substantially symmetrical about an axis 72 in alignment with the depending sealing plug 70. The axis 72 is perpendicular to the plane of the paper in FIG. 6. By the present invention, there is provided a longitudinal bearing rib 74 which is off-center with respect to the axis 72. This rib normally engages the surfaces 39, 40 of the spout 22 when the cap is in the closed, sealing position. The rib enables a limited pivotal movement of the cap, as in the first-mentioned embodiment.

Referring to FIG. 7, during operation of this embodiment, a depressing force is applied by the users fingers to the cap 64 adjacent the hinge 20. Due to the off-center rib 74, the cap tilts a greater amount than in the first embodiment, the greater tilt being sufficient to cause a complete disengagement of the sealing beads 68 and 32. As a result, the beads completely by-pass one another and the cap 64 assumes its open, product-discharging position analogous to that of FIG. 1. Such an arrangement permits removal of the cap by a single depressing operation, as opposed to the construction of FIGS. 1-5 where a depress-and-lift operation was required. The reclosure of the cap to the sealing position is readily effected, as in the first embodiment. The additional ribs 76, 78 adjacent rib 74 provide stiffening, and in addition the rib 78 constitutes a seat for the cap on the upper surface of the spout when the cap is in the sealing or closed position.

Another embodiment of the invention is illustrated in FIG. 8, showing a cap body 80, and cap 18 connected therewith by a flexible hinge 20. In this embodiment, the cap 18 and hinge 20 are identical to those illustrated in FIGS. 1-5 and discussed in connection therewith. The cap 80 comprises an upstanding flange 82, upstanding posts 84, 86 which function in the same manner as posts 61, 62 of the cap of FIG. 2, and upstanding lugs 88 which provide a seat for the underside surface 28 of the cap 18. In accordance with the present invention there is provided an upstanding spout 90 on the cap body, an external sealing bead 92 engageable with the corresponding internal head 34 of the cap 18, and bearing surfaces in the form of reinforcing lands 94, 96 having a somewhat raised configuration. These lands provide a more rigid support for the bearing rib 42 of the cap, and tend to prevent permanent deformation of the spout 90 after prolonged periods of use.

Yet another embodiment of the invention is illustrated in FIGS. 9-11, showing a closure cap 18 held captive on a cap body 100 by a hinge 98. The cap 18 is identical to that illustrated in FIGS. I-S and discussed in connection therewith. By the present invention there is provided on the cap body 100 an upstanding flange 102 extending at least partially around the juncture of the cap body and cap when the latter is disposed in the closed, sealing position of FIG. 9. The flange has a substantially constant thickness except for the part 108 disposed between the two upstanding posts 104, 106, this part being thinner than the rest. The part 108 is also separated from the posts so as to enable limited inward flexing movement thereof, as illustrated in FIG. 10. The height of the part 108 is sufficient to normally cover the juncture 110 of the cap body and cap, so as to prevent access to the same by a child or other unauthorized person. In this embodiment there is also provided a reinforcing bridge 112joining the hinge web 98 and cap 18.

The operation of this embodiment can now be readily understood. With the cap 18 in the sealed position of FIG. 9, the closure construction presents a smooth domed cap having no gripping protrusions. The juncture of the lugs 88 and lifting edge 56 is hidden by the flange part 108, thus preventing the closure from being directly pryed off. Authorized opening of the closure is accomplished by applying a depressing force to either the cap itself or to the portion of the hinge adjacent the cap. The reinforcing bridge 112 minimizes relative movement between the two pieces to enable application of the force to either part. FIG. 10 illustrates the force being applied to the hinge 98. As this is done, the cap 18 is tilted, since it is pivoting on the rib 42. The tilting in turn raises the lifting edge 56 somewhat. Upon removal of the depressing force, the cap 18 will remain in the position of FIG. 10, since the corresponding detent beads of the cap and spout are still partially engaged. Next, the user flexes the flange part 108 inward slightly in order to engage the lifting edge 56 with the nail, and effects lifting of the cap. Provision of a flexible flange part 108 facilitates the engagement of the lifting edge by the finger of the user, without materially affecting the safety function, and may be a desirable feature for some applications. In this embodiment, a raised portion 113 is optionally provided on the hinge itself to indicate to the user the location for applying the depressing force. The option of initially pressing either the cap or the hinge adds flexibility to the closure function and will be advantageous under certain circumstances.

Another embodiment of the invention is illustrated in FIGS. 12 and 13, showing a closure construction comprising a closure cap 18, hinge web structure 20 and cap body 114. The cap 18 and web 20 are identical to those illustrated in FIGS. l-S. By the present invention, the cap body 114 comprises an upstanding flange 116 having a height at least sufficient to cover the underside surface 28 of the cap and prevent access thereto when the latter is in the sealing position of FIG. 13, and having a substantially constant radius of curvature 118. The part 120 of the flange 118 lying between the upstanding posts 122, 124 also has a substantially constant radius of curvature 126 which is less than the radius 118. The height of the part 120 is just sufficient to meet and fit snugly against the under surface 28 of the cap 18 when the latter is in the closed, sealing position of FIG. 13. By such arrangement, the crack between the cap surface 28 and part 120 is sufficiently small to prevent engagement of the lifting edge 56 by the nail of the user. In this embodiment, as in the previous ones, the upstanding posts 122, 124 prevent a child from inserting his teeth in the crack between the cap and flange part 120. Opening is accomplished by first pressing down on the cap to tilt the same, causing the front of the cap to be lifted, and subsequently engaging the lifting edge 56 with the fingers to pry off the cap.

Yet another embodiment of the invention is illustrated in FIGS. 14-16, showing a safety closure construction comprising a cap body 14, a cap 128 and a connecting hinge web 20. The cap body 14 and connecting web 20 are identical to those of FIGS. 1-5. Under certain circumstances it is desirable to provide for a construction wherein either greater or lesser pressures are required by the user in order to lift the cap 128 or to reclose the same. This is accomplished by reducing the cross sectional area of the annular bead 130 at the vicinity opposite the point of attachment of the hinge web 20. As illustrated in FIGS. and I6, the cross-sectional area of the bead 130 at the sides of the cap is greater than that at the said vicinity. The reduced cross-sectional area of the bead facilitates tilting of the cap 128 when pressure is applied to the domed surface adjacent the hinge, thus making the initial opening operation smoother and easier. Replacement of the cap is also facilitated since the bead 130 will more easily bypass the spout bead 32 during reclosing. Alternately, the cap bead 130 could have a constant crosssectional area, and the spout head 32 reduced in size at the appropriate corresponding location for achieving the same results as above.

Still another embodiment ofthe invention is shown in FIGS. 17-19. The cap body 14 and hinge are identical in construction to those illustrated in FIGS. 1-5. By the present invention, the underside of the cap 132 comprises an annular, depending guide bead 134 extending at least partially around the periphery of the cap 132. The cross-sectional configuration of this head is particularly illustrated in FIG. 19. The bead 134 functions as a guide during reclosure of the cap, by cooperating with the upstanding flange 26 which tends to centralize the cap with respect to the cap body and to thus align the cap sealing bead 136 with the spout sealing bead 32. This is accomplished when the outside bevelled edge 138 of the guide bead 134 and the flange 26 engage one another. The bead 134 can extend either entirely or only partially around the cap periphery, this latter case being shown in FIG. 17, the interruption in the bead 134 being designated 140. Such an interruption presents a planar lifting edge on the underside of the cap and facilitates engagement of the edge by the users nail during opening.

Still another embodiment of the invention is illustrated in FIGS. 20-22, showing a safety closure construction comprising a cap body 142 and a cap 144 held captive by a flexible hinge web structure 146. In accordance with the present invention there is provided on the cap body 142 an upstanding flange I48 extending at least partially around the juncture of the cap body and cap when the latter is in the closed, seal ing position, a pair of upstanding posts 150, 152 on the body 142 bearing access to the lifting surface 154 of the cap (FIG. 21) by the teeth of a small child, and additional upstanding posts 156, 158 on the body disposed adjacent the hinge web structure 146. The additional posts provide a shield for the hinge 146 when the latter is in the position shown in FIG. 20, and have been found to be very effective in preventing attempts by a small child to employ his teeth to directly pry off the cap. Note that only a very small loop portion of the hinge is exposed, and I have found that this loop does not provide sufficient area to enable the child to engage the hinge with his teeth and force off the cap.

The operation of the closure is analogous that of the previous embodiment shown in FIGS. 1-5, except that in the present case, the initial downward pressure must be applied to the cap itself and not to the hinge. To facilitate this, there is provided a U-shaped raised pressure portion 160, shown particularly in FIGS. 20 and 22. This raised portion defines a shallow recess 162 to indicate the location for applying pressure and to receive the end of the users finger. The raised portion can be conveniently molded integral with the domed surface of the cap, and thus presents no additional expense in the manufacture of the closure.

A still further embodiment of the invention is illustrated in FIGS. 23, 24 and 25. This embodiment differs from the previously described embodiments in that the tilting of the cap is sidewise, and that as the latter tilts it results in one side raising and providing access for the users fingernail under the edge. The lifting force is then applied to the raised edge ofthe cap after the other side has been depressed.

Parts similar to those already described above have not been given reference numerals and will not be described further, since this is unnecessary. Considering FIG. 24, the cap has a curved bead I77 constituted as an integral raised portion, such bead indicating the place where donwward pressure is to be applied. Due to the raised nature of the portion 177 a greater downward pressure can be readily exerted at this point.

Upon such pressure being brought to bear, the opposite side portion 179 of the cap will be raised slightly, as in the manner illustrated in H0. for example. This will enable the user to apply his fingernail under the portion 179 so as to complete the removal of the cap 175 from the cap body 181.

Considering FIG. 23, the cap 175 has fulcrum beads I83 and 185 which are engageable respectively with a groove I87 and a raised nib 189 of the cap body 181. By such construction the sidewise tilting of the cap 175 can be readily effected, by virtue of the fulcrums 183, 185. A strengthening fillet 191 is provided within the front wall 193 of the cap body 181, and the body has a pair of upstanding guard ears or hinge guard posts [95 disposed on opposite sides of the hinge web 197. The guard ears 195 have tapered depending portions 199, FIG. 25, which prevent an unauthorized user from applying his teeth to the hinge web 197 in an effort to dislodge and directly remove the cap 175.

Referring to FIGS. 23, 26 and 27, the cap body is shown as being provided with a supporting ledge 202 which is located inside the flange 26a in a position diametrically opposite the raised pressure portion 177 of the cap 175. The ledge 202 engages the adjoining rim portion 204 of the cap, and constitutes a positioning means for the latter. Also, the cap body has a detent nib 206 located in the flange 26a, arranged to engage the adjoining rim portion 208 of the cap 175 as seen in FIG. 26. When pressure is applied to the portion 177 of the cap as illustrated in FIG. 27, the rim portion 208 thereof will be forced downwardly past the nib 206, and the diametrically opposite rim portion 204 will be raised out of engagement with the ledge 202. The provision of the ledge and nib results in a more distinct and definitive action when the cap is being actuated for removal, as can be readily understood.

In other respects generally the cap construction of FIGS. 23-27 is similar to those already described above.

From the foregoing it can be seen that I provided a novel and improved safety closure which is simple in construction, inexpensive to manufacture, and is capable of being molded in plastic as a single integral piece. The closure provides quick access to the container by authorized personnel, and yet features excellent protection and safety to young children. it is thus seen to represent a distinct advance and improvement in safety closure technology.

Variations and modifications are possible without departing from the spirit of the invention.

1 claim:

1. A safety cap construction for hand-held dispensers, comprising in combination:

a. a tubular cap body having a top discharge opening.

b. a captive closure cap adapted to fit the opening of the cap body so as to seal the same,

c. cooperable yieldable detent means on the cap body and cap, tending to hold the latter firmly on said body, said yieldable detent means extending through an angle of substantially greater than 180 about the cap body,

d. a flexible hinge web structure connecting said cap body and closure cap for holding the latter captive while enabling it to be swung from a sealing position closing off the opening of the body to a discharge position removed from the opening of the body, said web structure comprising an elongate loop extending through a semi-circle when the cap is disposed on the cap body,

c. said cap body having an upstanding flange extending at least partially around the juncture of the cap body and cap when the latter is assembled thereto in the closed, sealing position, thereby bearing access to the juncture and normally preventing the cap from being directly pryed off by the fingers, said cap body having an upstanding spout portion disposed within the confines of the upstanding flange,

f. said cap having a normally inaccessible lifting edge on its underside,

g. cooperable pivot bearing means on the upstanding spout portion of the cap body and cap and including a fulcrum disposed substantially diametrically across the underside of the cap, for raising one portion of the lifting edge higher than other portions thereof and above adjacent portions of the flange in response to depressing movement of an off-center portion of the cap, said edge moving upward to a position exposing it to enable engagement thereof by the fingers of the user for prying the cap off of the cap body, and

h. means for stiffening the closure cap against flexing during such depressing movement to prevent deformation thereof and thus insure adequate raising of the lifting edge.

2. The invention as defined in claim 1, wherein:

a. said cap body has a raised bearing surface,

b. said fulcrum comprising a bearing rib adapted to overlie and engage said bearing surface when the cap is disposed in the closed, sealing position,

0. said bearing surface and rib constituting said pivot bearing means about which the cap can undergo limited pivotal movement with respect to the spout portion and cap body in response to depressing movement of one portion of the cap.

3. The invention as set forth in claim 1, wherein:

a. said spout portion has an upper bearing surface,

b. said fulcrum comprising a bearing rib adapted to overlie and engage said bearing surface when the cap is disposed in the closed, sealing position,

c. said spout portion having a resilient external annular bead,

d. said cap having a resilient internal annular bead adapted to engage the bead of the spout portion when the cap is in the closed position,

c. said beads constituting said detent means,

f. at least one of said beads undergoing limited deformation to enable the cap bead to bypass the spout bead and thereby expose the lifting edge of the cap for engagement by the user's fingers.

4. The invention as defined in claim 3, wherein:

a. said bearing surface comprises oppositely disposed areas on the periphery of the spout portion, adjacent the bead thereof.

5. The invention as defined in claim 4, and further including:

0. said cap bearing rib being disposed off center and toward said pressure point of the cap, whereby for a given displacement of said cap portion the lifting edge of the cap is raised by a greater amount than would be the case if the rib were on center.

7. The invention as defined in claim 1, and further including:

a. a pair of spaced-apart upstanding posts carried on said cap body near the periphery thereof and disposed generally opposite said off-center portion,

b. said posts barring access to the juncture of the cap body and cap, thus preventing unauthorized prying off of the cap by the teeth of a small child.

8. The invention as defined in claim 7, wherein:

a. a part of the upstanding flange is disposed between said upstanding posts,

b. said part being thinner than other portions of the flange, and being capable of limited inward flexing movement to facilitate engagement of the lifting edge of the cap by the fingers of the user.

9. The invention as set forth in claim 7, wherein:

a. a part of the upstanding flange is disposed between said upstanding posts,

b. the height of the flange part between the posts being less than that of other portions of the flange, to facilitate engagement of the lifting edge of the cap by the fingers of the user.

10. The invention as set forth in claim 9, wherein:

a. the portions of the flange outside the posts lie along a circle,

b. the flange part between the posts lying along a circle of radius less than the first-mentioned circle,

c. said flange part being adapted to closely abut the underside of the cap lifting edge and forming a flush surface with the front edge of the cap to eliminate gripping protrusions, whereby the lifting edge is normally inaccessible when the cap is in the closed, sealing position.

ll. The invention as set forth in claim 7, wherein:

a. a part of the upstanding flange is disposed between said upstanding posts,

b. said part having cut out portions adjacent the posts, respectively, whereby it is free to move independently of the posts.

12. The invention as set forth in claim I, and further including:

a. a raised pressure portion on the cap opposite the lifting edge, to indicate to the user the location for applying a depressing force to effect removal of the cap.

l3. The invention as set forth in claim I, and further including:

a. a raised pressure portion on the hinge web structure adjacent the point of attachment thereof to the cap, to indicate to the user the location for applying a depressing force to effect removalof the cap.

14. The invention as set forth in claim l, and further including:

a. a reinforcing bridge joining the web structure and cap to minimize relative movement thereof, whereby a depressing force for effecting removal of the cap can be applied either to the cap or to the web structure itself.

IS. The invention as set forth in claim 2, wherein:

a. said spout portion has an aperture constituting a discharge opening,

b. said cap having a depending sealer plug adapted to extend into said aperture and sealingly close the same when the cap is in the closed, sealing position.

16. The invention as set forth in claim 3, wherein:

a. said cap has a depending skirt of annular configuration,

b. said cap bead being disposed on the inner surface of said skirt,

c. said skirt being resilient to enable said cap bead to undergo limited outward flexing movement during its bypass of the spout portion bead.

17. The invention as set forth in claim 3, wherein:

a. said cap bead has a reduced cross-sectional area in the vicinity of the cap at the lifting area to facilitate bypassing movement of the two beads at said vicinity when depressing force is applied to the opposite side of the cap.

18. The invention as set forth in claim I, wherein:

a. said cap has a depending guide bead of annular configuration disposed at the periphery thereof to facilitate alignment of the cap with the upstanding flange when the cap is swung from the open, discharging position to the closed, sealing position.

l9. The invention as set forth in claim 18, wherein:

a. said guide bead has an interruption adjacent the lifting edge of the cap, thereby preserving for the user the grip capability of said edge.

20. The invention as set forth in claim I, and further including:

a. a pair of hinge guard posts carried on the cap body and disposed on opposite sides of the hinge web structure, for barring access thereto by the teeth of a child.

2]. The invention as set forth in claim 1, wherein:

a. said cap has a raised pressure portion disposed substantially from the location of said hinge web structure to indicate to the user the location for applying a depressing force to effect removal of the cap.

22. The invention as set forth in claim 21, wherein:

a. the closure cap fits inside of the top edge of the cap body,

b. said cap body having a supporting ledge located diametrically opposite the said pressure portion of the cap, for engagement with the latter,

c. said cap separating from said ledge in response to the application of depressing force to the raised pressure portion of the cap and tilting of the latter.

23. The invention as set forth in claim 21, wherein:

a. the closure cap fits inside of the top edge ofthe cap body,

b. said cap body having a detent nib which is located adjacent the raised pressure portion of the cap and is adapted to be engaged by the cap rim,

c. said detent nib being bypassed by the cap rim in response to the application of a depressing force to the raised pressure portion of the cap.

i i i

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3199751 *Feb 19, 1964Aug 10, 1965Pete JovanovichSelf clutching captive closure cap unit
US3739957 *Oct 14, 1971Jun 19, 1973Starlite Mfg CoCover for decanter or like liquid dispensing container
US3758000 *May 14, 1971Sep 11, 1973Drackett CoSafety closure for containers
US3826394 *Dec 19, 1972Jul 30, 1974Stull MSafety cap
US3845872 *Apr 9, 1973Nov 5, 1974Brindisi AContainers and safety closure therefor
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4022352 *Apr 26, 1976May 10, 1977Pehr Harold TContainer cover and safety closure
US4203532 *Mar 19, 1979May 20, 1980Bob MarSafety containers
US4209100 *Jun 1, 1979Jun 24, 1980Owens-Illinois, Inc.Safety closure
US4653676 *Dec 28, 1984Mar 31, 1987Gene StullCaptive cap construction for hand-held dispenser
US4747511 *Jul 10, 1986May 31, 1988Sun Coast Plastics, Inc.Plug-type openers for plastic can ends
US4991730 *Sep 12, 1989Feb 12, 1991Pehr Harold TCaptive key release closure structure
US5092493 *Dec 27, 1990Mar 3, 1992Pehr Harold TCaptive key release closure structure
US5246145 *Feb 26, 1992Sep 21, 1993Nalge CompanyLiquid dropper spout having lockable pivoted closure cap
US5328058 *Sep 8, 1993Jul 12, 1994Nalge CompanyDropper bottle assembly with squeeze cap
US6039224 *Dec 17, 1998Mar 21, 2000Aptar Group, Inc.Multiple-orifice dispensing system with improved seal
US6241128Dec 22, 1998Jun 5, 2001Owens-Brockway Plastic Products Inc.Dispenser package for fluent products and method of manufacture
US6394323Aug 24, 1999May 28, 2002Owens-Brockway Plastic Products Inc.Dispenser package for fluent products and method of manufacture
US6615473Apr 11, 2001Sep 9, 2003Owens-Brockway Plastic Products Inc.Method of making a container and closure
US6622895Mar 11, 2002Sep 23, 2003Owens-Brockway Plastic Products Inc.Dispenser package for fluent products and method of manufacture
US6757957Jun 24, 2003Jul 6, 2004Owens-Brockway Plastic Products Inc.Dispenser package for fluent products and method of manufacture
US6866164Apr 26, 2002Mar 15, 2005Rexam Medical Packaging Inc.Child resistant dispenser
US7861873May 29, 2007Jan 4, 2011Rexam Closures And Containers Inc.Flip-top dispensing system with a child resistant latch mechanism
US8122969Feb 10, 2009Feb 28, 2012Tyco Fire Products LpLow pressure, extended coverage, fire protection sprinkler
US8176988May 6, 2010May 15, 2012Tyco Fire Products LpEarly suppression fast response fire protection sprinkler
US8186448May 6, 2010May 29, 2012Tyco Fire Products LpEarly suppression fast response fire protection sprinkler
US8292101Jan 18, 2010Oct 23, 2012Remax Healthcare Packaging Inc.Flip-top dispensing system with a child resistant latch mechanism
US8327946Jul 18, 2011Dec 11, 2012Tyco Fire Products LpDry sprinkler
US8469112Jul 13, 2010Jun 25, 2013Tyco Fire Products LpDry sprinkler
US8485270May 24, 2012Jul 16, 2013Tyco Fire Products LpEarly suppression fast response fire protection sprinkler
US8528653Jul 9, 2010Sep 10, 2013Tyco Fire Products LpDry sprinkler
US8657020Jan 19, 2012Feb 25, 2014Tyco Fire Products LpLow pressure, extended coverage, fire protection sprinkler
US8746356Jul 18, 2011Jun 10, 2014Tyco Fire Products LpDry Sprinkler
US8839877Mar 8, 2013Sep 23, 2014Tyco Fire Products LpLow pressure, extended coverage, fire protection sprinkler
USRE29793 *Sep 29, 1977Oct 3, 1978 Container cover and safety closure
EP0023396A1 *Jul 3, 1980Feb 4, 1981Sunbeam Plastics CorporationChild-resistant dispensing closure
EP2314520A1 *Oct 23, 2009Apr 27, 2011Nestec S.A.A closure
WO2002042174A1 *Nov 9, 2001May 30, 2002Alpla WerkeClosure made of a flexible plastic for containers, especially for bottles
WO2008141162A1 *May 9, 2008Nov 20, 2008Lohrman RichardDispensing closure with hinged lid
WO2011048017A1 *Oct 15, 2010Apr 28, 2011Nestec S.A.A closure
WO2011048166A1 *Oct 21, 2010Apr 28, 2011Nestec S.A.A closure
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/153.14, 215/238, 215/305, 215/211, 222/556
International ClassificationB65D47/12, B65D47/14
Cooperative ClassificationB65D47/148
European ClassificationB65D47/14D1