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Publication numberUS3929259 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 30, 1975
Filing dateJun 4, 1974
Priority dateJun 4, 1974
Publication numberUS 3929259 A, US 3929259A, US-A-3929259, US3929259 A, US3929259A
InventorsEsseluhn Werner F, Fegley Charles R
Original AssigneeEsseluhn Werner F, Fegley Charles R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Chemical dispensing anti-burglar device
US 3929259 A
Abstract
A chemical dispensing anti-burglar device is disclosed in which a chemical such as tear gas is discharged into the area to be protected when an intruder opens a window or a door or forces open a window or a door to enter a private or unauthorized area with which the device is associated. The anti-burglar device employs an expandable cartridge for moving a reciprocal member which will discharge a chemical from a pressurized container. An improved means for releasing a chemical from a pressurized container is described.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

lJnited States Patent Fegley et a1.

[ Dec. 30, 1975 CHEMICAL DISPENSING ANTI-BURGLAR DEVICE Inventors: Charles R. Fegley, 1606 Frush Valley Road, Laureldale, Pa; 19605; Werner F. Esseluhn, 12 Larchwood Road, Wyomissing, Pa. 19610 Filed: June 4, 1974 Appl. No.: 476,314

US. Cl. 222/61; 116/86; 222/82; 222/162; 222/325 Int. Cl. B67D 5/08 Field of Search 42/1 G; 116/65,75, 86, 116/139, 142; 222/3, 5,52, 61, 79, 81-83, 160,162, 389, 180,182, 183, 325-326, 319, 320-324 References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 6/1938 l-linchman ..222/5 5/1948 Dodelin ..222/5 2,570,438 10/1951 Flagge et al. 42/1 G 2,780,389 2/1957 Sandgren r 222/5 3,135,090 6/1964 Straight et a1. 222/82 3,246,801 4/1966 De Boet 222/5 3,670,690 6/1972 Swanson 116/142 FP 3,806,000 4/1974 Fegley 222/180 Primary Examiner-Robert B. Reeves Assistant Examiner-H. Grant Skaggs, Jr.

[57] ABSTRACT A chemical dispensing anti-burglar device is disclosed in which a chemical such as tear gas is discharged into the area to be protected when an intruder opens a window or a door or forces open a window or a door to enter a private or unauthorized area with which the device is associated. The anti-burglar device employs an expandable cartridge for moving a reciprocal member which will discharge a chemical from a pressurized container. An improved means for releasing a chemical from a pressurized container is described.

6 Claims, 46 Drawing Figures Sheet 1 0f 13 Dec. 30, 1975 [w WI i/hnfr M f J i A a W N I: m K h w/ in L fl/ i M V H i M 1/ H MHM XN m gm s m US. Patent US Pawn Dec. 30, 1975 Sheet20f13 3,929,259

US, Patent Dec. 30, 1975 Sheet30f13 3,@29,259

US. Patent Dec. 30, 1975 Sheet40f13 3,929,259

FIGURE II T E 1 HHHHP 2.0 22- i 6 lo 23 I -H 24 i L 2'..." l

I l5 l6 EJGURE l7 UM Patent Dec.30, 1975 Sheet50f13 3,929,259

FIGURE l3 FIGURE 54 US. Patent Dec. 30, 1975 Sheet6of13 3,929,259

III :12:

FIGURE 20 US, Patent Dec.30, 1975 Sheet7of13 3,929,259

FIGURE 23 FIGUR US. Patent Dec. 30, 1975 Sheet 10 of 13 3,929,259

305 310 314 I ---307 I I -3I3 III Hiiii 309 9 FIGURE 34 FIGURE 35 305 I 307 305 III"; 325

L FIGURE 32 FIGURE 33 mm Dec.30, 1975 Sheet 11 of 13 3,929,259

FIGURE 39 FIGURE 38 FIGURE 37 U, atant Dec. 30, 1975 Sheet 13 of 13 3,929,259

- v FIGURE ZE FKSURE 45 CHEMICAL DISPENSING ANTI-BURGLAR DEVICE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The invention relates generally to an anti-burglar device and more particularly to an anti-burglar device which discharges a chemical such as tear gas from a pressurized container, one type of which is an aerosol container, into a protected area upon activation by an unauthorized person, causing the protected area to be flooded with a chemical and forcing evacuation of the protected area by the intruder; but the invention is not limited to the use of the aerosol type container.

Chemical weapons have been known in the art for many years. One type of chemical weapon is the conventional tear gas grenade in which the firing member is generally triggered manually and the grenade is manually hurled at a target area, causing the target area to be flooded with the chemical irritant.

In another type of chemical weapon, the chemical irritant is stored under pressure in an aerosol type container. The firing member is again generally triggered manually and the chemical irritant in the form of a spray is manually directed at a target.

A third type of chemical anti-burglar device discharges an explosive tear gas shell into the area but this type is both dangerous and very limited as to the amount of tear gas which is discharged into the area to be protected.

Thus what is needed is an anti-burglar device in the form of a chemical dispenser which an intruder will activate the dispensing means of the pressurized chemical container with sufficient force to release the chemical from the pressurized container but which anti-burglar device is positively secured against accidental release until triggered by an intruder and which will then release a sufficient volume of the chemical into the protected area to force evacuation by the intruder.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The principle object of the present invention is to provide an anti-burglar device of the chemical dispensing type which may be triggered directly by a small amount of mechanical movement, and yet is positively secured against accidental release.

A further object of the invention is to provide an anti-burglar device of the chemical weapon type which is readily triggered by opening a door or window by an intruder entering an unauthorized area or by moving an object with which the device is connected.

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved means of spraying or discharging the chemical into the protected area in a minimum amount of time in order to force the intruder from the protected area and to prevent the intruder from re-entering the protected area for a reasonable amount of time.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a directable emission of the chemical, such as by means of rotatably adjustable spray head, so that the invention might be located on a door, wall, or the like, and yet, when the device is discharged, the chemical is directed into the area to be protected.

An additional object of the invention is to produce an audible alarm on certain embodiments of the chemical dispensing anti-burglar device; so that the chemical dispensing anti-burglar device will provide a warning to the intended victim, the owner, or security personnel.

According to the principle aspect of the present invention there is provided an improved means of releasing a chemical from a pressurized container of the anti-burglar device. Such means includes an expansive cartridge containing an expansive charge which increases in volume when activated causing a reciprocal member to discharge the chemical from'the pressurized container. The anti-burglar device is connected to a door or window or other object which might be moved by an unauthorized person entering a room or building, or other area from which it is desired to restrict unauthorized persons.

When the door or window associated with the device is opened by an unauthorized person or when the object is moved by an authorized person or when the person enters the restricted area, a contact closure sends an electric current from a power source through an electric element in the cartridge which causes the expansive charge to expand in volume. The expanding gases resulting from the expansion moves a reciprocal member which causes the discharge of the pressurized container.

Since the anti-burglar device is triggered by an electric current; the anti-burglary device can very easily be placed in a safe mode by authorized personnel by disconnecting the power source or opening a switch remote from the actuation switch.

A mechanical means for discharging the anti-burglar device through the means of a cord connected to the device is also disclosed.

The anti-burglar device of the chemical weapon type of the present invention may be utilized in homes, factories, farms, office buildings by attaching the device to doors, windows, etc. and may be used in connection with vehicles such as automobiles, boats, trucks, airplanes, etc. The device may also be employed for any other application wherein it is desired to prevent unauthorized persons from moving certain objects by placing the object against the actuator arm of the actuation switch to hold the actuation switch contacts open thereby preventing the device from firing until unauthorized movement of the subject objects.

Once actuated, the spray cannot be turned off by the intruder and the entire amount of pressurized chemical will be discharged into the protected area making it impossible for the intruder to remain in the protected area without having protective equipment.

Other objects, aspects and advantages of the invention will become apparent from the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. 1 is an elevational view of a wall of a room having one embodiment of the chemical dispensing anti-burglar device of the present invention secured to the wall and connected by means of wires to a switch on the sash of a window in the wall.

FIG. 2 is an elevational similar to FIG. I, but showing the window open and showing; the device discharging.

FIG. 3 is a side elevational view of the chemical dispensing anti-burglar device.

FIG. 4 is a front elevational view of the chemical dispensing anti-burglar device.

FIG. 5 is a top view of the chemical dispensing antiburglar device.

FIG. 6 is a partial horizontal section taken along line A-A of FIG. 3.

FIG. 7 is a vertical section taken along line BB of FIG. showing the expansive cartridge in its cocked position displaced from the pressurized container.

FIG. 8 is a vertical section taken along line CC of FIG. 7 showing the device discharging.

FIG. 9 is a horizontal section taken along line D-D of FIG. 7.

FIG. 10 is a horizontal section taken along line EE of FIG. 7.

FIG. 11 is a partial vertical section taken along line B-B of FIG. 5 showing a second embodiment of the antiburglar device containing a pressurized container of the aerosol type but with a recessed valve.

FIG. 12 is a partial vertical taken along line BB of FIG. 5 but showing a third embodiment of the anti-burglar device wherein the device is inverted and the chemical dispensing device contains a pressurized container having a pierceable seal.

FIG. 13 is a front elevational view similar to FIG. 3 but showing a fourth embodiment of the chemical dispensing anti-burglar device containing a pressurized container of the aerosol type with a projecting cap.

FIG. 14 is a partial vertical section taken along line FF of FIG. 13 showing the device discharging.

FIG. 15 is a top view of the fourth embodiment containing a projecting cap.

FIG. 16 is partial vertical sectional taken along line GG of FIG. 15.

FIG. 17 is a diagram of the circuit using the internal batteries of the anti-burglar device.

FIG. 18 is a diagram showing a circuit using an external power supply bypassing the on-off switch of the device.

FIG. 19 is a side elevational view similar to FIG. 13 but showing a fifth embodiment of the anti-burglar device wherein the reciprocal member activates the dispensing spout.

FIG. 20 is a front elevational view similar to FIG. 14 of the anti-burglar device.

FIG. 21 is a partial horizontal section taken along line I-IH of FIG. 19.

FIG. 22 is a partial horizontal section taken along line .IJ of FIG. 19.

FIG. 23 is a vertical section taken along line KK of FIG. 20 showing the expansive cartridge and the reciprocal member in its cocked position displaced from the dispensing spout of the pressurized container.

FIG. 24 is a partial vertical section taken along line LL of FIG. 23 but showing the device discharging.

FIG. 25 is a partial horizontal section taken along line MM of FIG. 23.

FIG. 26 is a partial horizontal section taken along line N-N of FIG. 24.

FIG. 27 is a partial vertical section taken along line I(--K of FIG. 20 but showing a sixth embodiment of the anti-burglar device containing a pressurized container of the aerosol type but with recessed valve.

FIG. 28 is a partial vertical section taken along line K-K of FIG. 20 but showing a seventh embodiment of the antiburglar device wherein the device is inverted and the chemical dispensing device contains a pressurized container having a pierceable seal.

FIG. 29 is a partial vertical section taken along line I(I( of FIG. 20 but showing an eighth embodiment of the device containing a pressurized container of the aerosol type with a projecting cap.

FIG. 30 is an elevational view similar to FIG. I but showing the anti-burglar device mounted on a wall and 4 connected by means of a cord to the sash of a window in the wall.

FIG. 31 is an elevational view similar to FIG. 30 but showing the window open and showing the device discharging.

FIG. 32 is a side elevational view of the chemical dispensing anti-burglar device.

FIG. 33 is a front elevational of the chemical dispensing anti-burglar device.

FIG. 34 is a top elevational view of the chemical dispensing anti-burglar device.

FIG. 35 is a partial horizontal section taken along line P-P of FIG. 33.

FIG. 36 is a vertical section taken along line RR of FIG. 33 showing the expansive cartridge and the reciprocal member in its cocked position and the pressurized container displaced from its discharging means.

FIG. 37 is a vertical section taken along line T-T of FIG. 36.

FIG. 38 is a horizontal section taken along line SS of FIG. 36.

FIG. 39 is a horizontal section taken along line QQ of FIG. 37.

FIG. 40 is a vertical section taken along RR of FIG. 33 but showing the chemical dispensing device discharging.

FIG. 41 is a horizontal section taken along line UU of FIG. 40.

FIG. 42 is a vertical section similar to FIG. 37 but showing a tenth embodiment wherein the pressurized container has a recessed valve.

FIG. 43 is a partial vertical section similar to FIG. 40 but showing an eleventh embodiment wherein the device is inverted and the chemical dispensing device contains a pressurized container having a pierceable seal.

FIG. 44 is a front elevational view showing a twelfth embodiment of the device wherein the device contains a projecting dispensing cap.

FIG. 45 is a vertical section taken along line V-V of FIG. 44.

FIG. 46 is a vertical section similar to FIG. 45 but showing the device discharging.

Description of the Preferred Embodiment Referring now to the drawings in detail, wherein like reference characters designate like parts throughout the various views, there is shown in FIGS. 1-10, one form of the anti-burglar chemical dispensing device, called device hereafter, of the chemical weapon type according to the present invention, generally designated 1.

As shown in FIGS. l-2, the device 1 is secured to a wall 90 and connected with connecting wires 44 and 45 to an actuation switch 43 mounted on the window frame 70. A switch actuation pin 48 is mounted on window in a manner that the switch actuation pin 48 depresses the switch actuation lever 49 and holds the switch actuation lever 49 such that the switch contacts are held open. The device 1 includes a self-contained power source such as a battery 17 but the power source is not limited to the battery 17 nor is the power source limited to being self-contained.

The device 1 whose front is shown in FIGS. 4 and 7 is comprised of a valved pressurized chemical container 35, called pressurized container 35 hereafter, a housing 4, an expansion chamber 42, an expansive charge 30 and a reciprocal member 28. One type of housing 4 is shown as being comprised ofa left housing half 2 and a right housing half 3 which when assembled provide three flat sides, other than the back for mounting the device 1 to the wall 90 adjacent to the window 70 or elsewhere, as may be convenient or desired.

Now referring to FIGS. 4 and 8, the container and expansion chamber cavity 34, the battery cavity 62, the switch cavity 63, and the cylindrical bore 64 are formed when the symetrically opposite housing halves 2 and 3 are joined together. As shown in FIGS. 7 and 8, the container and expansion chamber cavity 34 pro vides a means for slidably mounting the pressurized container 35 which is slidably confined in proper position. The pressurized container 35 of which one type is sold Penquin Industries, Inc., Parkesburg, Pa. identified as their 10-4 Chemical Billy but the invention is not limited to the use of this container. The pressurized container comprises of a spring urged dispensing spout 37 which when depressed discharges a chemical 39 through the center of the dispensing spout 37. Again referring to FIGS. 7 and 8, one type of expansion chamber 42 is shown as an expansive cartridge 65, but the invention is not limited to the use of the expansive cartridge 65 shown. The pressurized container and expansive cartridge cavity 34 also provides a means for mounting the expansive cartridge 65 and contains small vertical slots 33 formed in its sides. The purpose of these slots will become apparent later.

The battery cavity 62 provides a means for installing an electrical power source such as a battery 17 and the switch cavity 63 provides a means for installing an electrical switch 11 which is used to turn the device 1 off or on as desired.

As shown in FIGS. 3 and 7, terminals 14, 15 and 16 are installed on the bottom of the device 1 for convenience. The use of the terminals 14, 15 and 16 will be described in the description of electrical circuits showing different methods of making electrical connections to device 1.

Still referring to FIG. 7, a rotatable nozzle section 6 is rotatably mounted in the cylindrical bore 64 formed when the symetrically opposite housing halves 2 and 3 are joined together as shown in FIGS. 4 and 8. It is important that the rotatable nozzle 6 and its fluid passageway 8 be in coaxial alignment with projecting dispensing spout 37 of the pressurized container 35. As the pressurized container 35 moves in the direction of arrow 41; the fluid passageway 8 and nozzle section 9 provide a means for the chemical 39 to be discharged into and directed from when the dispensing spout 37 of the pressurized container 35 is forced into the entry section 7 by the action of the expansive charge 30 contained in the expansive cartridge 65, the action of which will be later described. The funnel shape of the entry section 7 engages the dispensing spout 37, which is made of relatively soft material and therefore provides an adequate seal at the entry section 7 to retain fluid flow in the passageway 8 at pressures normally used in pressurized containers.

As best seen in FIG. 7, the expansive cartridge 65 comprises: an electric element 31, a cartridge case 27, a reciprocal member 28, a retainer spring 66, and the expansive charge 30. The expansive cartridge 65 has a an electric element 31 installed and electrically insulated from the cartridge case 27. The expansive charge 30 such as gunpowder or any other material which will expand upon ignition, heating or release, is placed in the cartridge case 27. The reciprrocal member 28 is 6 installed over the cartridge case 27 and the assembly is held together by a light press fit between the cartridge case 27 and the reciprocal member 28. The retaining spring 66 is then placed over the assembled expansive cartridge 65 and the unit is mounted in the bottom of the pressurized cylinder cavity 34.

The retaining spring 66 has four spring sections 29 which are set in the retaining spring guide slots 32 formed in the housing halves 2 and 3. The friction of the retaining spring 66 and the retaining spring guide slots 32 holds the reciprocal number 28 in place until fired.

As can best be seen in FIGS. 1 and 7, one method of electrically connecting the device 1 is shown. The electric element wire 31 is connected to the terminal 15 by wire 23. Terminal 15 has an additional wire 22 attached to it which connects to the negative terminal of battery 17 through wire 22. The positive terminal of the battery 17 is connected to one pole of switch 11 by wire 20. The other pole of switch 11 is connected by wire 21 to terminal 17. A wire 44 is then connected from terminal 14 to a switch 43 located in an area where the intruder will activate the switch 43, one example of which is shown in FIG. 1. A wire 45 connects the other pole of switch 43 to terminal 16 thereby completing the circuit.

Switch 11 is turned on to activate the protective device 1. When an unauthorized person or intruder opens window 50; the pin 48 mounted on window 50 releases the activator arm 49 of switch 43 closing the contact of switch 43 and completing the circuit. The electric current then causes the an electric element 31 to heat which causes the expansive charge 30 to expand rapidly forcing the reciprocal members 28 and the retainer spring 29 toward the container 35. The reciprocal member 28 and container 35 continue to move in direction of arrow 41 forcing the projecting dispensing spout 37 into engagement with. the entry section 7 of passageway 8 causing discharge. In addition, the retainer springs 29 snap open into the retainer spring slots 33 and prevent the reciprocal member 28 from moving in an opposite direction to arrow 41 thereby holding the projecting spout 37 in engagement with entry section 7 of fluid passageway 8 and causing the pressurized container 35 to discharge its contents 39 completely into the area to be protected.

It is an important feature that the pressurized cylinder 35 and the retaining spring 29 ride freely in their respective cavities formed in housing halves 2 and 3 and present a surface which will ride smoothly when the reciprocal member 28 is set off. Hence, substantially less force is required to discharge the device 1 of the present invention then would be required if the retaining spring 29 and pressurized cylinder 35 were tightly fit into their cavities, yet the device 1 can be safely handled in its cocked position because of the force required to depress the projecting dispensing spout 37. It is also important in this embodiment that the discharging means is comprised of a projecting dispensing spout 37 for activating a valved pressurized container 35 wherein fluid discharge is caused when the projecting dispensing spout 37 is depressed. The housing 4 contains a fluid passageway 8 having a funnel shaped entry section 7 for engaging the projecting spout 37 and for forming a seal between the funnel shaped entry section 7 and the dispensing spout 37, thereby, permitting fluid flow through the dispensing spout 37 and the funnel shaped entry section 7 when 7 the pressurized container 35 is moved toward the fluid passageway 8.

A second embodiment of the invention is illustrated in FIG. 11 as device 71. In this embodiment the basic structure is as previously described and like numbers are used to indicate like or corresponding parts.

In the second embodiment, the pressurized chemical container 35, shown in FIG. 7 having a projecting dispensing spout 37, is replaced with a pressurized chemical container 75, shown in FIG. 11, having a recessed valve. Pressurized containers of the aerosol type with a recessed dispensing valve are well known in the trade. In addition, the funnel shape of the entry section 7 of the fluid passageway 8 of the first embodiment shown in FIG. 7 is replaced with projecting spout 77 depending from housing halves 72 and 73, all of which are shown in FIG. 11.

In the second embodiment, all elements function as described in the first embodiment with the following difference. The pressurized container 75 is discharged by the action of the reciprocal member 28 moving the pressurized container 75 such that the recessed valve of the pressurized container 75 is depressed through engagement with projecting spout 77 and thereby effects discharge.

The chemical is then discharged through the valve of the pressurized container 75, through the projecting spout 77 and passageway 78 and out the orifice 79, then into the area to be protected.

A third embodiment of the invention is illustrated in FIG. 12 as device 81. In this embodiment, the structure is as previously described in the first embodiment and like numbers are used to indicate like or corresponding parts.

In the third embodiment, the pressurized chemical container 35, shown in FIG. 7 of the first embodiment and having a projecting dispensing spout 37, is replaced with a pressurized chemical container 85 shown in FIG. 12, having a pierceable seal 87. Pressurized container having pierceable seals are well known in the trade. In addition, the funnel shaped entry section 7 of the housing halves l and 2 of the first embodiment shown in FIG. 7 is replaced with housing halves 81 and 82 having a projecting section 67 shaped to pierce seal 87 and a means of making a seal capable of withstanding the pressure required for effectively discharging the chemical through the passageway 88 and into the restricted area.

Now referring to FIG. 12, FIG. 12 is an inverted embodiment of FIG. 7 of the first embodiment in which all elements function as previously described in the first embodiment with the following exceptions. The expansive cartridge 65 when fired forces the pressurized container 85 into pierceable engagement with the piercing projecting section 67. As the pierceable seal 87 is pierced by the action of the projecting forward section 67 of the housing halves 82 and 83 the reciprocal member 28 continues to move the pressurized container 85 forming a seal by the action of the O-Ring 68 and its retaining seat 69 and the pierceable seal 87 of the pressurized container 85. The chemical 39 is then discharged through the pierced seal 87 of the pressur-, ized container 85, through passageway 88, out the orifice 89, and then into the area to be protected. It is important in this embodiment that the discharging means comprises a shaped projecting forward section 67 of the housing halves 82 and 83 to facilitate piercing the pierceable seal 87 of the pressurized container 85.

Upon movement of the pressurized container toward the shaped projecting forward section 67, the shaped projecting forward section 67 pierces the pierceable seal 87 of the pressurized container 85. Continued movement of the pressurized container 85 compresses the O-Ring 68 forming a seal between the retaining seat 69 and the pressurized container 85 whereby fluid is dhscharged through the pierced seal 87 and the passageway 88.

A fourth embodiment of the invention is illustrated in FIGS. 13, l4, l5 and 16 as device 51. In this embodiment, the structure is as previously described in the first embodiment and like numbers are used to indicate like or corresponding parts.

In the fourth embodiment, the projecting dispensing spout 37 of the pressurized container 35, shown in FIG. 7, is replaced with a projecting dispensing cap 57 shown in FIGS. 13, 14 and 16. In addition, the fluid passageway 8 and the open entry section 7 are replaced with three apertures 54, 55 and 56.

Now referring to FIG. 14 and FIG. 16, the expansive cartridge 65 and reciprocal member 28 operates as before to move the pressurized cylinder 35. In this embodiment, the reciprocal member 28 urged pressurized cylinder 35 causes the projecting cap 57 to be depressed against the inside top portion of housing halves 52 and 53; thereby causing discharge through aperture 54.

Since it is possible to have more discharge apertures than aperture 54 in communication with the dispensing cap 57; apertures 55 and 56 are provided so that the dispensing cap 57 may be rotated to the desired apertures 54, 55 or 56 through the use of a screw driver in slot 60. It is also important in this embodiment that the discharging means comprises a projecting dispensing cap 57 for activating a valved pressurized container 35 wherein fluid discharge is caused when the projecting dispensing cap 57 is depressed. The housing 52 contains apertures 54 in communication with the orifice 59 of the projecting dispensing cap 57 for fluid discharge therethrough. Upon movement of the pressurized container 35, the projecting dispensing cap 57 is moved toward the housing. Continued movement causes the projecting dispensing cap 57 to be depressed whereupon the fluid is discharged through the projecting dispensing cap 57 and through aperture 54.

Now referring to FIG. 17, a typical circuit is shown using the battery 17 of device 1. The circuit shown within the dotted lines is contained within the device 1. An actuation switch 43 is connected by wires 44 and 45 to terminals 14 and 16 of the device 1. This places the component of device 1 in series with the activation switch 43 such that with switch 11 closed; an unauthorized person closing actuation switch 43 will cause electric current to flow. The current will then flow from battery 17 through: wire 20, switch 10, wire 21, terminal 14, wire 44, switch 43, wire 45, terminal 16, wire 24, electric element 31, wire 23, terminal 15, wire 22 and back to battery 17; thereby causing the device 1 to discharge.

FIG. 18 shows an additional circuit in which the power source is placed across 47. The circuit can be easily understood by those familiar with electrical schematics. 1

The preceding embodiments disclosed the preferred embodiments wherein an expansion cartridge is placed under a slidably mounted pressurized container. The following four embodiments will show that the chemi- 9 cal dispensing anti-burglar device will also work with an expansion cartridge in a manner to discharge the pressurized cylinder through the use of a reciprocal member in the form of a cylindrical plunger. In the following four embodiments, the basic structure is as described in previous embodiments and like numbers are increased by 100 to indicate like or corresponding parts. In addition, these embodiments are electrically connected in the same manner as previous described and shown in FIGS. 1 and 2.

The device 101 whose front is shown in FIGS. and 23 comprises of a valved pressurized chemical container 135, called pressurized container 135 hereafter, a housing 104, an expansion chamber 142, an expansive charge 130, and a reciprocal member 106. One type of housing 104 is shown as being comprised of a left housing half 102 and a right housing half 103. The housing halves 102 and 103 when assembled provide three flat sides, other than the back for mounting the devices 101 to the wall 90 adjacent to the window 70 or elsewhere, as may be convenient or desired.

Now referring to FIGS. 20 and 24 the container cavity 134, the expansion chamber cavity 164, the battery cavity 162, the switch cavity 163, and the cylindrical bore 151 are formed when the symetrically opposite housing halves 102 and 103 are joined together. As shown in FIGS. 23 and 24, the container cavity 134 provides a means for mounting the pressurized container 135 which is held in its proper position. The pressurized container 135 of which one type is sold by Penquin Industries, Inc., Parkesburg, Pa. identified as their 10-4 Chemical Billy but the invention is not limited to the use of this container. The pressurized container comprises of a spring urged dispensing spout 137 which when depressed discharges a chemical 139 through the center of the dispensing spout 137.

The battery cavity 162 provides a means for installing an electrical power source such as a battery 117 and the switch cavity 163 provides a means for installing an electrical switch 111 which is used to turn the device 101 off or on as desired.

As shown in FIGS. 19 and 23, terminals 114, 115 and 1 16 are installed on the bottom of the device for convenience. The use of the terminals 114, 115 and 116 will be described in the description of electrical circuits showing different methods of making electrical connections to device 101.

Now referring to FIG. 23, 24, 25 and 26; the cylindrical bores 151 are coaxial to the pressurized container cavity 134. The cylindrical bores 151 slidably mount a reciprocal member 106 which is coaxial to the pressurized container cavity 134 and in communication with the projecting dispensing spout 137 of the pressurized container 135 but is also displaced from the projecting dispensing spout 137. The reciprocal member 106 contains a forward annular flange section 152. When the device is triggered, the reciprocal member 106 will move down as indicated by arrow 141. As the reciprocal member 106 moves down, the flat springs 132 slide off the annular flange section 152 onto the smaller diameter of the reciprocal member 106 and prevent the reciprocal member 106 from moving in a direction opposite arrow 141.

The pressurized container 135 comprises a spring urged dispensing spout 137 which when depressed in the direction of the arrow 141 will discharge the chemical 139 through the center of the dispensing spout 137. The reciprocal member 106 contains a fluid passage.-

way 108 with an entry section 107 on the bottom and a horizontal passage 109 on the side to mount a nozzle section 159. The fluid passageways 108, 109 and nozzle section 159 provide a means for the chemical 139 to be discharged when the entry section 107 of the reciprocal member 106 is forced over the dispensing spout 137 by the expansive cartridge 165 and held in'discharge position by springs 132 acting on annular section 152 of reciprocal member 106. The action of the expansive cartridge 165 will be shown later. The funnel shape of the entry section 107 engages the dispensing spout 137 which is made of relatively soft material and therefore provides an adequate seal at the entry section 107 to retain fluid flow in the passageways 108 and 109 at pressures normally used in the pressurized container 137.

As best seen in FIGS. 23 and 24, the expansive cartridge 165 comprises: electric element 131, a cartridge case 128, the reciprocal member 106 and the expansive charge 130. The expansive cartridge 165 has a filament 131 installed and electrically insulated from the cartridge case 128. The expansive charge such as gunpowder or any other material which will expand upon ignition, heating or release, is placed in the catridge case 128. The reciprocal member 106 is installed in the cartridge case 128 and the assembly is held together by a light press fit between the catridge case 128 and the reciprocal member 106. The device 101 is electrically connected as previously disclosed wherein device 101 is substituted for device 1 in FIG. 1. Switch 111 is turned on to activate the protective device 101. When an unauthorized person or intruder opens window 50; the pin 48 mounted on window 50 releases the activator arm 49 of switch 43 closes the contact of switch 43 and completes the circuit. The electric current then causes the electric element 131 to heat which causes the expansive charge 130 to expand rapidly forcing the reciprocal member 106 down toward the pressurized container 135. The reciprocal member 106 continues to move in direction. of arrow 141 forcing the entry section 107 of passageway 108 over the dispensing spout 137 of the pressurized container 135, thereby causing discharge. As the reciprocal member 106 moves down over the dispensing spout 137, the retaining springs 132 slip off the annular ring 152 onto the smaller diameter of the reciprocal member 106, thereby locking the reciprocal member 106 into engagement with the projecting spout 137. At the bottom of the stroke, the expansive gases 142 are permitted to escape through vent holes 160.

It is an important feature that the reciprocal member 106 ride freely in the cylindrical bores 151 and present a surface which will ride smoothly when the expansive cartridge is set off. Hence, substantially less force is required to discharge the device of the present invention then would be required if the device were tightly fit, yet the device can be safely handled in its cocked position.

A sixth embodiment of the invention is illustrated in FIG. 27 as device 171. In this embodiment the basic structure is as previously described and like numbers are used to indicate like or corresponding parts.

In the sixth embodiment, the pressurized chemical container 135, shown in FIG. 23 having a projecting dispensing spout 137, is replaced with a pressurized chemical container 175, shown in FIG. 27, having a recessed valve. Pressurized containers of the aerosol type with a recessed dispensing valve are well known in the trade. In addition, the forward section 152 and the entry section 107 of the reciprocal member 106 of the fifth embodiment shown in FIG. 23 is replaced with a reciprocal member 176 having a projecting forward section 182 and an entry section 177 all of which are shown in FIG. 27. In this embodiment, all elements function as described in the fifth embodiment with the following difference. The pressurized container 175 is discharged by the action off the expansion cartridge 165 forcing the projecting forward section 182 of the reciprocal member 176 to engage with and to depress the recessed valve of the pressurized container 175 when the device 171 is triggered.

The chemical 139 is then discharged through the valve of the pressurized container 175, through the entry section 177 and passageway 178 and out the orifice 180, then into the area to be protected.

A seventh embodiment of the invention is illustrated in FIG. 28 as device 211. In this embodiment the structure is as previously described in the first embodiment and like numbers are used to indicate like or corresponding parts.

In this embodiment, the pressurized chemical container 135, shown in FIG. 23 of the fifth embodiment and having a projecting dispensing spout 137, is replaced with a pressurized chemical container 215 shown in FIG. 28, having a pierceable seal 217. Pressurized containers having pierceable seals are well known in the trade. In addition, the forward section 152 and the entry section 107 of the reciprocal member 106 of the fifth embodiment shown in FIG. 23 is replaced with a reciprocal member 216 having a projecting forward section 227 shaped to pierce seal 217 and a means of making a fluid seal capable of withstanding the pressure required for effectively discharging the chemical 139 through the passageway 218 and into the restricted area.

Now referring to FIG. 28, FIG. 28 is an inverted embodiment of FIG. 23 of the fifth embodiment in which all elements function as previously described in the fifth embodiment with the following exceptions. The reciprocal member 216 when moved by the expansive cartridge 165 is forced into pierceable engagement with the pierceable seal 217 of the pressurized cylinder 215 by the action of the expansive cartridge 165. As the pierceable seal 217 is pierced by the action of the projection forward section 227 of the reciprocal member 216. The reciprocal member 216 continues to move by the urging of the expansive cartridge 165 forming a seal by the action of the O-Ring 228 and its retaining seat 229 and the pierceable seal 217 of the pressurized container 215. The chemical is then discharged through the pierced seal 217 of the pressurized container 215, through passageway 218, out the orifice 220, and then into the area to be protected.

An eighth embodiment of the invention is illustrated in FIG. 29 as device 191. In this embodiment the basic structure is as previously described and like numbers are used to indicate like or corresponding parts.

In this embodiment, the pressurized chemical container 135, shown in FIG. 23 having a projecting dispensing spout 137, is replaced with a pressurized container 135, shown in FIG. 29, having a projecting dispensing cap 194. Pressurized containers of the aerosol type with projecting dispensing caps are well known in the trade. In addition, the forward section 152 and the entry section 107 of the reciprocal member 106 of the fifth embodiment shown in FIG. 23 is replaced with a 12 reciprocal member 196 in communication with but displaced from the projecting dispensing cap 194 all of which are shown in FIG. 29.

In this embodiment, all elements function as described in the fifth embodiment with the following difference. The pressurized container is discharged by the action of the expansive cartridge forcing the cylindrical plunger 196 to engage with and to depress the projecting dispensing cap 194 of the pressurized container 135 when the device 191 is triggered.

The chemical is then discharged through the valve of the pressurized container 135, through the passageway of the projecting dispensing cap 194, through the orifree 199 and out aperture 205, then into the area to be protected.

The preceding embodiments disclosed the embodiments wherein an expansive cartridge is electrically activated to discharge the chemical into an area to be protected. The following four embodiments will show that the chemical dispensing anti-burglar device can be activated mechanically.

Referring now to the drawings in detail, wherein like reference characters designate like parts throughout the various views, there is shown in FIGS. 3041, one form of the chemical dispensing anti-burglar device, called device hereafter, of the chemical weapon type according to the present invention, generally designated 303. The device 303 is secured to a wall 304 and connected by means of a core 302 to a window sash 301, in the wall 304 so that upon opening of the window sash 301 by a burglar or other intruder, the device 303 will be actuated to discharge a chemical 334 into the restricted area. The device 303 whose front is shown in FIG. 33 comprises of a valved pressurized chemical container 311, called pressurized container 311 hereafter, a housing 304, an expansion chamber 359, an expansive charge 318 and a reciprocal member 316. One type of housing is shown as being comprised of a right housing half 309 and a left housing half 310. The housing halves 309 and 310 when assembled provide three flat sides, other than the front, for mounting the device 303 to the wall 304 adjacent to the window sash 301 or elsewhere, as may be convenient.

Now referring to FIGS. 33, 36 and 37 the container and expansion chamber cavity 314, the spring cavity 327, and the cylindrical bore 332 are formed when the symetrically opposite housing halves 309 and 310 are joined together. As shown in FIGS. 36 and 37, the container and expansion chamber cavity 314 provides a means for slidably mounting the pressurized container 311 which is slidably confined in proper position. The pressurized container 311 of which one type is sold by Penquin Industries, Inc., Parkesburg, Pa. identified as their 10-4 Chemical Billy" but the invention is not limited to the use of this container. The pressurized container 311 comprises of a spring urged dispensing spout 313 which when depressed discharges a chemical 334 through the center of the dispensing spout 313.

Again referring to FIGS. 36 and 37, the container and expansion chamber cavity 314 also provides a mounting means for the expansive cartridge 315 and contains small vertical slots 320 formed in its sides. The purpose of these slots will become apparent later.

Still referring to FIG. 36, a rotatable nozzle section 305 is rotatably mounted in the cylindrical bore 332 formed when the symetrically opposite housing halves 309 and 310 are joined together as shown in FIGS. 33 and 37. It is important that the rotatable nozzle 305 and

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Classifications
U.S. Classification222/61, 222/162, 222/325, 116/86, 222/82
International ClassificationG08B15/00, G08B15/02
Cooperative ClassificationG08B15/02
European ClassificationG08B15/02