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Publication numberUS3929337 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 30, 1975
Filing dateFeb 5, 1975
Priority dateFeb 7, 1974
Also published asCA1030993A1, DE2504899A1
Publication numberUS 3929337 A, US 3929337A, US-A-3929337, US3929337 A, US3929337A
InventorsGeoffrey Hayes
Original AssigneeToy Dev Limited
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Board game apparatus
US 3929337 A
Abstract
Apparatus for playing a game includes a board having its playing surface divided into equal size squares. Two sets of dice are provided which are readily distinguishable from each other by a common characteristic. All the dice of both sets are of equal size and each die is of such dimensions as to substantially fully occupy one square. In each set of dice, one die is "special" and has all its faces marked with a "special" symbol. All the other dice of the two sets have their faces marked in the conventional manner with symbols from one to six in numerical value. In playing the game, a die is tumbled from one face to another as it is moved from square to square. The game apparatus further includes a set of cards for indicating the symbol to be presented on the uppermost face of a die when it is moved from an initial position to a new position along a permitted path.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 11 1 Hayes 51 Dec. 30, 1975 [54] BOARD GAME APPARATUS [75] Inventor: Geoffrey Hayes, Prestbury, England [73] Assignee: Toy Development Limited, England [22] Filed: Feb. 5, 1975 [21] Appl. No.: 547,200

[30] Foreign Application Priority Data Feb. 7, 1975 United Kingdom 5771/75 [52] US. Cl...... 273/134 C; 273/131 B; 273/131 K; 273/134 G; 273/136 R; 273/136 E; 273/137 Primary Examiner-Delbert B. Lowe Attorney, Agent, or FirmWolf, Greenfield & Sacks [5 7] ABSTRACT Apparatus for playing a game includes a board having its playing surface divided into equal size squares. Two sets of dice are provided which are readily distinguishable from each other by a common characteristic. All the dice of both sets are of equal size and each die is of such dimensions as to substantially fully occupy one square. In each set of dice, one die is special and has all its faces marked with a special symbol. All the other dice of the two sets have their faces marked in the conventional manner with symbols from one to six in numerical value. In playing the game, a die is tumbled from one face to another as it is moved from square to square. The game apparatus further includes a set of cards for indicating the symbol to be presented on the uppermost face of a die when it is moved from an initial position to a new position along a permitted path.

3 Claims, 12 Drawing Figures US. Patent Dec. 30, 1975 Sheet 1 of4 3,929,337

U.S. Patent Dec. 30, 1975 Sheet 2 of4 3,929,337

BOARD GAME APPARATUS This invention relates to apparatus for playing a game.

According to the present invention, there is provided apparatus for playing a game comprising in combination a game board having a playing area which is divided into a plurality of playing positions, and at least two pluralities of playing pieces in the form of dice, each die having on at least some of its faces a number, symbol or the like which determines the movement of said die on said playing area, the pluralities of dice being distinguishable from each other.

In a preferred form of the invention, the game board will be similar to a standard chess or draughts board, in that the board will include a playing area which is divided into 72 playing positions, i.e., 9 playing positions by 8 playing positions, adjacent playing positions being of different colours, for example, 36 white playing positions and 36 black playing positions arranged alternately and in regular array.

Preferably, apparatus according to the invention will include two pluralities of dice, each plurality consisting of, for example, nine dice and the six faces of eight of the dice carrying spots or other markings to denote the numerals l to 6. The dice of the two pluralities will preferably be of differing colours as will the spots or other markings thereon. For example, one set of dice may be white with red spots or other markings, and the other set of dice may be red with white spots or other markings. Alternatively, the dice may be of the same colour with spots or other markings of differing colours.

Each plurality 'of dice will include a special or master die having a symbol on each of its six faces.

Apparatus according to the invention will also preferably include a plurality, preferably six, of cards which indicate possible moves and results of such moves during playing of a game.

In order that the invention may be more readily understood, an embodiment thereof will now be described, by way of example, reference being made to the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of apparatus according to the invention showing the dice in position at the commencement of a game;

FIG. 2 is a cross-section of the board of FIG. 1 and showing the inter-relationship of a die therewith;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of apparatus according to the invention showing the dice in position during the playing of the game;

FIG. 4 shows perspective views of two dice forming part of the apparatus of the invention;

FIG. 5 shows developments of the dice of FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 shows a pack of cards forming part of the apparatus of the invention;

FIGS. 7 to 12 show to enlarged scale the illustrations on the cards of FIG. 6 which indicate, the possible moves of a die during playing of the game.

Referring to the drawings, the apparatus comprises a game board 2 having a playing area 4 which is defined by a peripheral flange 6 and which is divided into playing positions 8 by longitudinal and lateral flanges 10 and 12. As will be seen from the drawing, there are 72 playing positions, nine positions by eight positions. Adjacent playing'positions are of differing colours, for example black and white, so that the playing area 4 is of chequer-board appearance. Said playing positions 8 are square in plan view and are defined by the flanges 10 and 12. As will be seen, the playing area is located on a base member 14, best seen in FIG. 2, forming part of the game. The playing area 4 may be composed of a clear transparent material, the differing colours for the playing positions being printed or otherwise applied to the base member 14.

Adapted to be arranged on the game board 2 are pluralities of dice indicated generally by reference numerals 16 and 18. Each of the pluralities 16 and 18 of dice comprise nine dice, eight what might be termed conventional dice 20 and 22 respectively and a special or master die 24 and 26 respectively. The conventional form'dice 20 and 22 have on their six faces spots being representative of numerals one to six (see FIG. 5), and the special or master dice 24 and 26 have on each of their six faces symbols 24A and 26A which are identical to each other. This symbol is also applied to the game board as shown in 8A and 8B in FIG. 3.

The plurality 16 of dice are of a different colour and have different coloured spots and symbols than do the plurality 18 of dice. For example, the plurality 16 may be white with red spots and symbols, and the plurality 18 of dice may for example be red with white spots and symbols, although other combinations could be used if preferred.

As will be seen, particularly from FIG. 4, each die is formed such that adjacent faces of the die are formed with peripheral recesses 16A and 18A, with the effect that the bearing surfaces of the dice, i.e., the planar faces, are narrower than the overall dimension of the dice. Thus the dice are able to fit into the playing positions 8, which prevents or lessens the danger of the dice becoming accidentally dislodged from the playing positions.

The dice are preferably formed of a synthetic plastics material, and the spots and symbols are preferably inset into the faces of the dice.

FIG. 6 shows a plurality 28 of cards forming part of the apparatus according to the invention. Each of the cards, referenced 28A, 28B, 28C, 28D, 28E and 28F, carry an illustration, referenced 30, 32, 34, 36, 38, 40, respectively, showing the results of moving the dice during theplaying of the game. These cards may be composed of plastics material or of a stiff card or other material, and there may, if desired, be two pluralities of such cards forming part of the apparatus of the invention. In each of FIGS. 7 to 12, the spot(s) at the centre of the illustrations show which spot(s) will be on the uppermost face of a die immediately before the die is moved during playing of the game. The spot(s) outside the matrices of squares show those spot(s) which will be on the vertical faces of the die corresponding to the spot on the uppermost face of the die, and the spots in the other squares of the matrix illustrate which spots will be uppermost at the completion of die movement.

In FIG. 7, for example, a single spot is shown as being on the uppermost face of the die and spots being representative of the numerals 2, 3 4, and 5 on the vertical faces of the die. The spots appearing in the squares show which face of the die will be uppermost after the die has been moved during playing of the game, this being dependent upon which vertical face of the die is facing the player moving the die. For example if the 4 spots are facing the player and the die is moved towards the player one position, then the 3 spots will become uppermost as indicated at 42. Simi- 3 larly, if the spots are on the vertical face of the die facing the player and the die is moved away from the player one position, then the 5 spots will become uppermost as indicated at 44.

In FIG. 8, where it is shown that the 2 spots are up- 5 permost, in which case the 5 spots are not visible (since they are on the lower horizontal surface of the die), then if the 4 spots are facing the player and the player moves the die away from him one playing position and then one playing position to the right, than the 1 spot will be uppermost as indicated at 46. If on the other hand, the player, after moving the die one playing position forwardly then moves the die one playing position to the left, then the 6 spots will be uppermost as indicated at 48 in the upper portion of the relevant square. Similarly, it can be established which faces of the die will be uppermost when the other vertical faces of the die are facing the player, and also when other directions of die movement are made.

Similar conditions appertain to the illustrations of FIG. 9 where the 3 spots are uppermost. Assuming the 5 spots are facing the player and the die is moved three playing positions in a straight line towards the player then the 5 spots will be uppermost at the termination of movement as indicated at 50. Alternatively, if the player moves the die three playing positions in a straight line to his right then the 1 spot will become uppermost as indicated at 52. If, on the other hand, the player moves the die one playing position away from the player and then two playing positions to the left then the 3 spots will become uppermost as indicated at 54 and so on.

Turning now to FIG. 10, where the 4 spots are uppermost, it will be seen that if the 5 spots are facing the player, and the player moves the die away (upwards in the drawing) from him one playing position and then three playing positions to the right, then the 6 spots will be uppermost as shown at 56 in the left-hand segment of the square. If, on the other hand, after the die has been moved upwardly one playing position, the die is then moved three positions to the left, the 1 spot will become uppermost as indicated at 58. Other movements of the die will be apparent by reference to the drawing.

The illustration in FIG. 11 works on the same principle as above described, and FIG. 12 indicates by means of arrows 60 and 62 how movements of the die along the differing paths result in differing spots finishing on the uppermost face of the die after the die movement is completed.

In playing the game, the object is to take the opponents master or special die, 24 or 26, and/or to land your master or special die on the opponent's playing position 8A or 88.

At the commencement of the game, the dice are arranged on the playing area as shown in FIG. 1 and the players in turn move any one of their dice. The die may be moved the number of playing positions indicated by the number of spots on the uppermost face, the die being moved by tumbling the die over on the adjacent face. The dice can be moved backwards, forwards and sideways or a combination of such movements, subject to there being only one direction change, but they cannot be moved diagonally. The master or special dice 24 and 26 can be tumbled once in any direc tion, except that like the other dice they cannot be moved diagonally. The dice cannot jump over other dice, so that if on moving a particular die, it is seen that 4 another die is in the path of movement, then a direction change must be made. A player may take any of his opponents dice by landing exactly on the same square as the opponents die. The die taken is then removed from the board and takes no further part in the game.

FIG. 3 illustrates a typical situation during the playing of a game, where it will be seen that the dice have been moved to differing locations on the playing area of the game board.

In one variant of the game, if during play, a players special or master die is taken and removed from the field of play, then the other player has not necessarily won the game since it is still possible for that players special or master die to be taken before reaching the opponents playing position 8A or 88, resulting in a drawn game.

It will be appreciated that modification may be made to the various pieces forming the apparatus of the invention. Those which readily suggest themselves are that the game board could be a conventional draughts or chess board having 64 playing positions, in which case the number of dice of each plurality would be reduced. Also, the dice themselves may be formed differently from those described, in that they could be conventional dice. Also, the colours mentioned herein, and the form of the symbols referred to earlier may be other then those described and illustrated.

Finally, it will be appreciated that there may be four pluralities of dice, in which case it would be desirable to increase the number of playing positions to and to exclude the corner positions of the playing area from use. In such an arrangement, two quite separate games could be proceeding at the same time, although the play value and the difficulty in reaching the goal will be increased in view of the fact that more dice, thus providing more obstacles, will be in the playing area.

What we claim is:

1. Apparatus for playing a game comprising the combination of 1. a first set of equal size dice, one die of the set having all its faces presenting the same symbol, all the other dice in the set being marked with symbols of different numerical value whereby each face of a die bears a symbol of different value from the symbols on the other faces of the die,

2. a second set of dice equal in size and number to the first set of dice, the second set of dice being marked in the same manner as the first set of dice, the second set of dice having at least one common characteristic that enables any die of the set to be readily distinguished from any die of the first set,

3. means providing a playing surface divided into contiguous and aligned squares of equal sizes, each square being of substantially the same size as a die face, the playing surface having sufficient squares to permit the first set of dice to be aligned in a row parallel to a row of the second set of dice with a plurality of squares being vacant to accommodate movement of the dice,

4. and means for indicating the symbol to be presented by the uppermost face of a die in a new position on the playing surface when the die is moved from its initial position to its new position along a permitted path having the number of squares equal to the numerical value that is on the uppermost face of the die in the initial position.

2. Apparatus according to claim 1, wherein the playing surface is provided with ridges along the borders of the squares to promote tumbling of a die as it is moved from one square to the next.

3. Apparatus according to claim 2, wherein the edges faces of the dle overlymg the ndges' of each die are recessed to permit the die to sit in the well formed by the bordering ridges with the vertical

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4030763 *Jan 29, 1976Jun 21, 1977Peter James Calvert QuigleyDice game
US4213615 *Jul 24, 1978Jul 22, 1980Price Howard CBoard game with movable playing pieces
US4244580 *Jun 4, 1979Jan 13, 1981Hoyles Francis XMultivariant board game apparatus
US4282824 *Oct 27, 1978Aug 11, 1981Lafferty Lyndon EMemory aiding device
US4305585 *Oct 16, 1978Dec 15, 1981Thomas R. BrownBoard game apparatus
US4470602 *Jun 1, 1982Sep 11, 1984Reed Charles FBoard game having pieces which change mode on each move
US4527800 *Sep 6, 1983Jul 9, 1985Terry SamanskyFoldable board game with triangular and trapazoidal areas
US4583742 *Jun 25, 1984Apr 22, 1986Barry SlinnBlock and board puzzle game
US4936588 *Jan 3, 1989Jun 26, 1990Rader Robert EBoard game combining chance and skill
US5306016 *Jan 23, 1991Apr 26, 1994Mcinnis James MPace board game
US5536015 *Aug 7, 1995Jul 16, 1996Chen; Chin ChenChess game
US5641166 *Dec 1, 1995Jun 24, 1997Reisel; WalterDiverse board game
US6209870 *May 19, 1999Apr 3, 2001Patrick J SheaCombination golf dice game and method for playing
US6213466 *Mar 10, 1999Apr 10, 2001Max RosenCrash-action, vehicle racing game and method
US6460854 *Nov 9, 1999Oct 8, 2002Mccarey James RoyPuzzle type game
US6588752 *Aug 13, 2001Jul 8, 2003Mickowski Daria McardleMultilevel checkers game
US7278636 *Dec 20, 2004Oct 9, 2007Zajac John DMethod and apparatus for playing a dice game
US7401781 *Aug 27, 2004Jul 22, 2008Winsor ConceptsMethod for playing a game
US8074985 *Mar 27, 2008Dec 13, 2011Winsor ConceptsVirtual game
US8342524 *Jul 25, 2011Jan 1, 2013Winsor CorporationVirtual game
US8403328 *Feb 3, 2010Mar 26, 2013Rolf VandorenGame board and accompanying game pieces
US8408549 *Feb 5, 2009Apr 2, 2013Lego A/SGaming dice
US8413987Jul 25, 2011Apr 9, 2013Winsor ConceptsVirtual gaming machine
US20110042891 *Feb 5, 2009Feb 24, 2011Lego A/SGaming dice
US20110151962 *Mar 27, 2008Jun 23, 2011Winsor ConceptsVirtual game
US20110291360 *Feb 3, 2010Dec 1, 2011Rolf VandorenGame board and accompanying game pieces
US20110309576 *Jul 25, 2011Dec 22, 2011Winsor ConceptsVirtual Game
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WO2000069536A1 *Apr 20, 2000Nov 23, 2000Patrick J SheaCombination golf dice game and method for playing
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/243, 273/146, 273/260, 273/282.3
International ClassificationA63F3/02, A63F9/04, A63F3/00, A63F3/04
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/00697, A63F9/0413, A63F3/00574, A63F2003/00485
European ClassificationA63F3/00P, A63F3/00B9