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Publication numberUS3930097 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 30, 1975
Filing dateAug 21, 1974
Priority dateFeb 16, 1973
Publication numberUS 3930097 A, US 3930097A, US-A-3930097, US3930097 A, US3930097A
InventorsAlberino Louis M, Farrissey Jr William J, Rose James S
Original AssigneeUpjohn Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Novel compositions and process
US 3930097 A
Abstract
Heat resistant reinforced composites, including laminates, are described which comprise a reinforcing material and a polyimide, the latter being characterized by the recurring unit WHEREIN 10-90 PERCENT OF THE UNITS HAVE AND THE REMAINDER HAVE OR A MIXTURE OF THESE.
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United States Patent Alberino et a1.

[ *Dec. 30, 1975 NOVEL COMPOSITIONS AND PROCESS Inventors: Louis M. Alherino, Cheshire;

William J. Farrissey, Jr., Northford; James S. Rose, Guilford, all of Conn.

[73] Assignee: The Upjohn Company, Kalamazoo,

Mich.

[ Notice: The portion of the term of this patent subsequent to Dec. 25, 1990,

has been disclaimed.

Filed: Aug. 21, 1974 Appl. N0.: 499,137

Related US. Application Data Continuation-impart of Ser. No. 333,384, Feb. 16, 1973, abandoned, which is a continuation-in-part of Ser. No. 317,957, Dec. 26, 1972, abandoned, which is a continuation-in-part of Ser. No. 124,958, March 16, 1971, Pat. No. 3,708,458, which is a continuation-in-part of Ser. No. 75,667, Sept. 25, 1970, abandoned.

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS Alberino et a1 260/65 Primary Examiner-Marion E. McCamish Attorney, Agent, or FirmJames S. Rose; Denis A. Firth [57] ABSTRACT Heat resistant reinforced composites, including lamimates, are described which comprise a reinforcing material and a polyimide, the latter being characterized by the recurring unit co I wherein 10-90 percent of the units have and the remainder have or a mixture of these.

23 Claims, No Drawings NOVEL COMPOSITIONS AND PROCESS CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION This application is a continuation-in-part of cop ending application Ser. No. 333,384 filed Feb. 16, 1973, now abandoned which latter is in its turn a continuation-in-part of application Ser. No. 317,957 filed Dec. 26, 1972, now abandoned, which latter is in its turn a continuation-in-part of application Ser. No. 124,958.

filed Mar. 16, 1971 now issued as US. Pat. No. 3,708,458, which latter is in its turn a continuation-inpart of application Ser. No. 75,667 filed Sept. 25, 1970, now abandoned.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Said polyimides contain from to 90 percent of the recurring units derived form 4,4-methylenebis(phenyl isocyanate) or the corresponding diamine and the remainder derived from toluene diisocyanate or the di amine. The copolyimides of the aforesaid eopending application possess, among other properties, excellent mold flow characteristics which render them especially useful in the preparation of molded articles particularly reinforced articles, laminates and the like.

It was also disclosed in said copending application that a certain group of said copolyimides, namely those in which from 70 to 90 percent of the recurring units were derived fromBTDA and toluene diisocyanate or the corresponding diamine, possessed solubility in organic solvents in addition to enhanced structural strength properties, mold flow properties and the like as compared with the homopolyimides based on toluene diisocyanate or methylenebis(phenyl isocyanate) alone. i

The solvent soluble materials are especially useful in the preparation of reinforced composites, particularly laminates.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION- This invention comprises heat resistant, reinforced composites which composites comprise, in combination,

i. a copolyimide having the recurring unit and the remainder of said units are those in which R represents a member selected from the group consist- 1 ing of and mixtures thereof; and

ii. a reinforcing material.

A particularly preferred embodiment of the invention comprises composites of the above type in which only from 10 to 30 percent of said recurring units are those in which R represents The composites of the invention can be employed for the fabrication of a wide variety of heat resistant articles such as bushings, seal faces, electrical insulators, compressor vanes and impellers, pistons, piston rings, gears, thread guides, cams, brake linings, clutch faces, abrasive articles and the like.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION The copolyimides having the recurring unit (I) can be prepared by the procedures which are described in detail in the aforesaid U.S. Pat. No. 3,708,458, the disclosures of which are hereby incorporated by refer- 40. ence in their entirety. Thus the various copolymides having the recurring unit (I) are obtained by condensing BTDA with a substantially stoichiometric amount of a mixture of toluene diisocyanate and methylenebis(phenyl isocyanate) or a mixture of the corresponding diamines under conditions which are described in detail in the aforesaid copending application. The relative molar proportions in which the toluene diisocyanate and the methylenebis(phenyl isocyanate) [or the corresponding diamines] are employed determines the proportion in which the recurring units corresponding to these starting materials occur in the ultimate copolyimide.

The reinforcing material employed in the composites of the invention can be a filler such as powdered aluminum, copper, graphite, molybdenum disulfide (M08 and the like or, advantageously the reinforcing material can be fibrous in nature and, preferably, is prepared CO CO M ITWQC co (I) wherein from 10 to 90 percent of'said recurring units from or composed of high temperature resistant mateare those in which R represents rials. lllustratively the reinforcing materials employed in the composites of the invention are fibrous materials prepared from quartz, metal, glass, boron, graphite, aromatic polyamides, polyimides or polyamide-imides, and the like. These fibrous reinforcing materials can be 3 in the form of filaments, yarn, roving, chopped roving, knitted or woven fabrics and the like. The reinforcing material is used in an amount ranging from about percent by weight to about 78.5 percent by weight of the total composites weight.

In general the reinforced composites of the invention are prepared by dry blending the reinforcing materials with powdered copolyimides having the recurring unit (l) and then subjecting the dry blend to fusion under pressure at a temperature which is at least as high as the glass transition temperature of the compolyimide.

As mentioned above, those copolyimides having the recurring unit (I) which are soluble in dipolar aprotic solvents are particularly useful in the preparation of the composites of the invention using fibrous reinforcing materials. Examples of dipolar aprotic solvents which can be used to prepare solutions of these polyimides are dimethylformamide, dimethylacetamide, dimethylsulfoxide, dimethylsulfone, hexamethylphosphoramide, N-methyl-Z-pyrrolidone, tetramethylurea, pyridine, and the like.

The reinforced composites of the invention prepared from the solvent soluble copolyimides and fibrous reinforcing materials are generally prepared by contacting the reinforcing material with, or incorporating; it into, a solution of the copolyimide in dipolar aprotic solvent, thereafter removing the solvent from the mixture and then subjecting the reinforcing material, impregnated with copolyimide, to fusion under pressure at a temperature which is at least as high as the glass transition temperature of the copolyimide.

In a particularly preferred embodiment of the invention there is produced a true laminate. Any of the methods previously employed in the art for the preparation of laminates from thermoplastics can be employed; see for example, Kirk-Othmer, Encyclopedia of Chemical Technology, Vol. 8, p. 185, The lnterscience Encyclopedia, Inc., New York, 1952; Encyclopedia of Polymer Science and Technology, Vol. 2, p. 300, John Wiley'& Sons, New York, 1965; ibid, Vol. 8, p. 121, I968.

lllustratively, in one embodiment a plurality of layers of a woven fibrous reinforcing material are impregnated with a solution of a copolyimide having the recurring unit'(l) hereinbefore defined for solubility in a dipolar aprotic solvent. Advantageously there is used a solution which contains from about 15 to about 25 percent by weight of copolyimide and this solution is applied to the reinforcing material in such amount as to deposit on the latter an amount of polyimide which corresponds to about 30 to about 50 volume percent, in combination with about 50 to about 70 volume percent of reinforcing material.

The impregnation of the fibrous reinforcing material with the copolyimide can be accomplished by any of the methods conventional in the art for such a process, i.e. by dipping, spraying, brushing, and other such methods of contacting the reinforcing material with the solution of copolyimide.

After the impregnation has been completed, the dipolar aprotic solvent is removed from the impregnated material by evaporation of about 95% of the solvent at 80 to lOOC and the remainder advantageously at a temperature near the boiling point of the solvent and under reduced pressure. The layers of impregnated fibrous reinforcing material (prepreg) which are thus obtained are then assembled in overlapping relationship in a suitable mold of any desired configuration and are subjected to heat and pressure to produce the desired laminate. The pressures employed generally range from about 2,000 psi to about 3,000 psi and the temperatures are at least as high as the glass transition temperature of the copolyimide, i.e. of the order of about 310C, and preferably are within the range of about 340C to about 360C.

A further embodiment for the production of a laminate allows for the presence of residual solvent in the prepreg layers before being assembled in a suitable mold or between the platens of a press. As much as about 15% solvent may remain in the layers. A plurality of the prepreg layers containing remaining solvent are assembled in overlapping relationship in a vented mold. Advantageously the latter is formed between the platens of a press. The assembled prepregs are then heated in the mold at temperatures above the boiling point of the particular solvent employed and advantageously of the order of about 200C to about 250C. This procedure is continued until the bulk of the solvent has been removed, i.e. the solvent content of the prepregs has been reduced to about 4 percent by weight or less. At this point the temperature in the mold is increased, preferably gradually, to the order of about 340C to about 360C and maintained thereat, with bumping (i.e. sudden momentary release of pressure by venting) until no further solvent remains. Thereafter, the material in the mold is subjected to pressures of the order of about 300 to 500 psi at a temperature in the same range as that employed in the second stage of solvent removal for a period of several minutes to several hours depending upon the particular polyimide components employed. The laminates so obtained are void free, high density, and have zero volatiles.

In yet another embodiment of the invention, high quality laminates with excellent physical properties are the invention is that it allows for the production of large size laminates without the need of expensive high pressure presses. The process is conducted by subjecting the laminate pack to vacuum rather than pressure during the heating or curing cycle and said process is well known by those skilled in the art; see Encyclopedia of Polymer Science, Vol. 2, p. 300, supra.

ln corresponding manner, other composites of the invention can be prepared. Thus, where the reinforcing material is in the form of non-woven yarn or roving, the material is first impregnated with copolyimide as described above and then subjected to pressure molding under the conditions of pressure and heat described above. If desired, the impregnated roving or yarn can be chopped into relative short lengths, for example into lengths of one-quarter to several inches, and the chopped, impregnated material is subjected to molding. This particular embodiment is particularly useful where it is desired to orient the reinforcing material in a particular manner within the finished molding.

Where the reinforcing material in the composite is in the form of a particulate material such as a powdered metal, graphite, molybdenum disulfide and the like, or in the form of chopped roving or yarn, the composite is prepared by homogeneously blending the reinforcing material with the powdered copolyimide of recurring unit (I) and subjecting the dry blend to molding under the conditions described above in a suitable mold of any desired configuration.

It will be apparent to one skilled in the art that the Carbon diOXide IO A miXtUfe of 55-75 g- (0321 above described procedures for the preparation of mole) of toluene-2,4-diisocyanate and 20.2 'g. (0.081 polyimide composites represent a marked advance mole) of 4,4- methylenebis(phenyl isocyanate) was over methods hitherto known in the art. This advantage 5 added dropwiseover a period of 7 hours to the above flows from the fact that the copolyimides having the solution with stirring. The temperature of the reaction recurring unit (1) can be molded in a chemically-finmixture was maintained at 84C throughout theaddiished form. That is to say that polyimide composites tion and thereafter for a period of 17 hours. At the end hitherto prepared in the art could not be prepared of this time a small quantity (3.024 g.) of toluene-2,4- readily fromchemically-finishedforms o'fpolyimides l0 diisocyanate in 50 ml. ofN-methylpyrrolidinone was nor were such polyimides hitherto known solvent soluadded dropwise with stirring over a period of 6 hours. ble and/or thermoplastic. Accordingly it has hitherto The temperature of the reaction mixture was mainbeen necessary to form the composite using a polyitained unchanged at -84C during this second addition. mide-prepolymer, or a polyamic-acid and to convert After the addition was complete, the reaction mixture this prepolymer to a finished polyimide as part of the was allowed to cool ,to room temperature (circa C) molding operation. Since the final conversion to polyand was then diluted by the addition of 800ml. of imide has generally involved the generation of a sub- N-methylpyrrolidinone. The resulting solution was stance such as water which is volatile under the condislowly added with stirring to 2000 ml. of isopropyl tions of molding, this has led to difficulties such as alcohol. The solid which separated was isolated by formation of voids in the molded part which have 20 filtration, ground in aWaring blender and washed with greatly detracted from structural strength and other two 2000 ml. portions of isopropyl alcohol. Thesolid properties of the latter. precipitate was then dried in a vacuum oven for-24 In addition to the advantages inherent in the case of hours at 190C and a pressure of 0.2 .to 0.5- mm. of production of the composites of the invention, it is i 7 mercury. There was then obtained 152 g. of a random. found that the structural strength, heat resistant and like properties of these composites are markedly supe I recurring units had the structure:

I o I CO V co /N cs co Co rior to the properties of similar composites prepared and approximately 20 percent of the recurring units from homopolyimides in which the group R in the rehad the structure:

curring unit (I) is either vwholly represented by The copolyirnide had-an inherent viscosity of 0.4 (1

percent solution in dimethylsulfoxide).

EXAMPLE 1 Q A 10 ply polyimide-fiber glass laminate was prepared by first brushing a 20% j'solution of BTDA-SO/ZO TDl(- toluene diisocyanate)MDl[methylene(bis phenyl, .isocyanate)] polyimide (preparedas described' infrcparation 1) dissolved in N me'thylpyrrolidone (NMP) on CH3 CH3 one side ofa single layer of 181E (A-l 10())* fiber glass cloth held in tension on a hand coating machine. Solvent was removed by infrared heaters and the cloth or turned over and the polyimide solution applied to the I opposite side. Again the solvent was removed to yield a stiff fiber glassprepreg. Using this prepreg cloth, any

or wholly represented by 50 3 v number of layers may be laminated, but in this specific The following preparation and examples describe the exam le,-l0 l er ere prepmcdzusing the following manner and process of making and using th-einvention procedure. T r

and set forth thebest mode contemplated by the inventors of carrying'out the invention but are not to be 181E (A4100) fiber glass Clot-h pp y construed aslimiting I lington Glass Fabrics Co. and E designates the type of v glass and 181 designates the weave; A-l 100 is y-amino- PREPARATION 1 y 4 propyltriethoxysilane supplied by-Union Carbide and a I acts as a coupling agent between the glass cloth and the A mixture of 128.9 g. (O.4 mole) of 3 ,3 ',4,-benpolymer being applied.

zophenone tetraearboxylic acid dianhydi'ide, 1.5 g. Of Ten layers of prepreg were placed in a heated press antioxidant (1,3,5-trimcthyl-2,4,6-tris[3,5-di-t-butyland held 5 minutes at 340 to 360C under 2,000

hydroxybenzyllbenzene) 11nd 750 0f N-m thylpyr- 3,000 psi. The press was cooled and the resulting lamirolidinone was heated under an atmosphere of dry n t had the following physical properties.

25 copolyimide wherein approximately percent of the co v C0 *1 Flexural Strength psi Room Temp. 55.0 X 10 550F 44.0 X 10 Flexural Modulus psi Room Temp. 3.95 X 10" 550F 3.60 X 10 lnterlaminar Shear psi 2.3 X 10 Impact Strength-Notched ft-lb/in. 23 Oxygen Index '7! Downward burn 90-100 Upward burn 70 Flexural Strength psi 46.0 X 10" Heat Distortion Temp. C "to plane 500 Flex ral Modulus psi 2.30 X 10 (264 psi) of weave a 4-10 plane 378 I of weave l5 EXAMPLE 5 A continuous strand graphite fiber* -polyimide EXAMPLE 2 A ply polyimide-graphite cloth laminate was prepared using the procedure described in Example I,

Hitco G(G1550)* graphite cloth being used in place of fiber glass cloth. Ten individual graphite cloth prepreg layers were laminated using the same pressing conditions outlined in Example 1.

* Hitco G(G1550). a product of Hitco Co.. is a graphite cloth having 99% minimum carbon content with a fiber diameter of 0.0003 inch.

A 10 ply polyimide-high temperature organic fabric (PRD-49)** laminate was prepared using a 16% solution of BTDA-80/2O TDI/MDI polyimide (prepared as described in Preparation l) dissolved in NMP and the coating procedure described in Example 1 except that a small proportion of solvent was left in the prepreg. Ten plies of prepreg were placed in a press at 100C and 200-250 psi. The following heat cycles were performed.

** See DuPont Bulletin A-80296. "PRD-49 is a temporary designation for a new organic fiber"; no degradation of yarn properties in short term exposures up to temperatures of 500F" Increase temp. to 180C, hold 1 hour Increase temp. to 200C, hold 1 hour Increase temp. to 210C, hold I hour Increase temp. to 225C, hold 1 hour Increase temp. to 250C, hold 1 hour Cool to 150C and demold.

EXAMPLE 4 A continuous strand fiber glass-polyimide molded composite was prepared using the following procedure.

Fiber glass roving was aligned on a glass plate and impregnated with enough of the NMP solution of 20% polyimide described in Example 1, so that when solvent was removed the prepreg after removal from the glass was 50% glass fiber by weight. Ten layers of prepreg were cut to fit a 5" X 2 /2" stainless steel mold and laid longitudinally in the mold. The molding conditions consisted of holding the mold for 5 minutes at 340 to 360C under 2,000 3,000 psi. The mold was cooled and the resulting composite was demolded and found to have the following properties molded composite was prepared using the procedure of Example 4 except the prepreg layer contained by weight of graphite fiber. Ten layers of this prepreg were molded using the same procedure of Example 4 yielding a composite having the following properties Flexural Strength psi Flexural Modulus psi Fortafil S-T'. a graphite roving supplied by Great Lakes Carbon Corporation EXAMPLE 6 lined below. See Example 3 Increase temp. to 180C, hold 1 hour Increase temp. to 200C, hold 1 hour Increase temp. to 210C, hold 1 hour Increase temp. to 225C, hold 1 hour Increase temp. to 250C, hold 1 hour Cool to 150C and demold to yield a composite having the following properties Flexural Strength psi 26.6 X 10" Flexural Modulus psi 3.80 X 10" EXAMPLE 7 A chopped fiber glass strand-polyimide molded composite was prepared by impregnating fiber glass roving with a 20% solution of BTDA-/2O TDl/MDI polyimide (prepared as described in Preparation 1) dissolved in NMP. The amount of solution employed was adjusted so that when solvent was removed the fiber glass content was 70%. The prepreg fibers were chopped into short lengths of /z". A 5' X 2 /2" stainless steel mold was charged with 70 g. of the chopped prepreg then pressed at 340 360C under 2,000 3,000 psi for 5 minutes. The mold was cooled and opened to yield a composite having the following properties A chopped graphite fiber-polyimide molded composite was prepared by impregnating graphite fibers with a 20% solution of BTDA80/20 TDl/MDI polyimide (prepared as described in Preparation 1) dissolved in NMP. The amount of solution employed was adjusted so that when solvent was removed the graphite fiber content was 70%. These prepreg fibers were chopped into short lengths of /z. A X 2 /2 stainless steel mold was charged with 70 g. of the chopped prepreg then pressed at 340 360C under 2,000 3,000 psi for 5 minutes. The mold was cooled and opened to yield a composite having the following properties Flexural Strength psi 13.3 X Flexural Modulus psi 3.00 X 10 EXAMPLE 9 A chopped fiber glass strand-polyimide molded composite was prepared by dry blending the powdered polyimide of BTDA-80/20 TDI/MDI (prepared as described in Preparation 1) with 4 inch chopped glass strands so as to yield a dry blend which contained 20% by weight of chopped fiber glass. A 5'' X /2"2 /2stainless steel hold was charged with 70 g. of the blend and pressed at 340 360C under 2,000 3,000 psi for 5 minutes. The mold was cooled and opened to yield a composite having the following properties Flexural Strength psi 20.2 10

Flexural Modulus psi 0.95 X 10 EXAMPLE 10 A chopped fiber glass strand-polyimide molded composite was prepared as in Example 9 except that the dry blend contained 30% by weight in chopped fiber glass. The composite had the following properties Flexural Strength psi 20.8 X 10 Flexural Modulus psi 1.26 X 10 EXAMPLE 1 l A chopped fiber glass strand-polyimide molded composite was prepared as in Example 9 except the dry blend contained 40% by weight of chopped fiber glass. The composite had the following properties Flexural Strength psi 20.1 -X 10 Flexural Modulus psi 1.53 X 10" EXAMPLE 12 A chopped fiber glass strand-polyimide molded composite was prepared as in Example 9 except the dry blend contained 40% by weight of chopped fiber glass and 5% by weight of molybdenum disulfide (M05 The composite had the following properties Flexural Strength I psi 11 2 X l0 Flexural Modulus psi 1.30 X 10 EXAMPLE 13 A chopped graphite fiber strand-polyimide molded compositewas prepared by dry blending the powdered polyimide of BTDA-80/20 TDI/MDl (prepared as described in Preparation 1 with inch chopped graphite strands so as to yield a dry blend which contained 15% by weight of chopped graphite. A 5" 2 /2 stainless steel mold was charged with g. of the blendand pressed at 340 360C under 2,000 3,000 psi for 5 minutes. The mold was cooled and opened to yield a composite having the following properties A polyimide molded composite containing chopped graphite fiber strand in combination with graphite powder was prepared by dry blending the powdered polyimide of BTDA-/20 TDl/MDI (prepared as described in Preparation 1 with inch chopped graphite strands and graphite powder so as to yield a dry blend which contained 15% by weight of chopped graphite and 13% by weight of graphite powder. The powder was added to impart lubricity to the final molded piece and the chopped strand to offset the usual decrease in flexural strength associated with the use of graphite powder. A 70 g. sample of the blend was molded according to the procedure used in the previous examples and yielded a composite having the following properties Flexural Strength psi 14.2 X 10 Flexural Modulus psi 0.90 X l0 EXAMPLE 15 Flexural Strength psi 13.7 X 10 Flexural Modulus psi 0.53 X 10 Tensile Strength psi 10.500

Compressive Strength psi 20.800

EXAMPLE 16 A molybdenum disulfide (M08 powder-polyimide molded composite containing 15% by weight of MoS was prepared according to the procedure of Example 15 to yield a composite having the following properties Flexural Strength Flexural Modulus psi psi EXAMPLE 17 An aluminum powder-graphite powder-polyimide molded composite containing 50% by weight of aluminum powder and 28 /2% by weight of graphite powder was prepared according to the procedure of Example 15 to yield a composite having the following properties The resulting laminate had the following properties Flcxural Strength psi 39.4 X 10'? Flcxural Modulus psi 2.13 X 10" We claim: 1. A heat resistant, reinforced composite comprising, in combination,

i. from about 21.5 percent by weight to about 85 percent by weight of a copolyimide consisting essentially of the recurring unit N/co @:co \N R co/ co Flexural Strength psi 3.65 X 10" Flexural Modulus psi 0.85 X 10" EXAMPLE l8 A 40 ply polyimide-fiber glass laminate was prepared by taking 40 layers of prepreg prepared in accordance with Example 1 except that 15% solvent (by weight) was left in the individual layers, and subjecting the 40 layers, placed one on top of another, to the following EXAMPLE 19 A 12 ply polyimide-fiber glass laminate was prepared by taking 12 layers of prepreg prepared in accordance with Example 1 except that 8-l0% solvent (by weight) was left in the individual layers. Twelve layers of prepreg were packed on an aluminum plate 12" X 12"- 1", having a /s" X /2" channel running around, and 1'? in from the edge of the plate. A tube leading through one side of the plate to the channel was connected to a vacuum pump. A Mylar* film was placed over the laminate pack and sealed to the plate on the I." strip between the channel and edge with high temperature sealant to form a sealed vacuum bag. The platens of a press were used only to supply heat to the pack under the following curing cycles.

1. The vacuum was taken down to inches of mercury and temperature held at 180C for 4 hours.

2. The temperature was then raised to 200C at 25 inches of mercury and held for 1 hour.

3. The laminate was removed from the vacuum bag and further cured starting at 200C and increasing in 2530C increments at 1 hour intervals to a maximum of 320C *Mylar is a DuPont trademark for polylcthylcne tcrcphthalatc).

wherein from 10 to 90 percent of said recurring units are those in which R represents and the remainder of said units are those in which R represents a member selected from the group consisting of I cH CH3 and and mixtures thereof; and

ii. from about 15 percent by weight to about 78.5

percent by weight of a reinforcing material.

2. A composite according to claim 1 in which the reinforcing material is fibrous.

3. A composite according to claim 1 in which the reinforcing material is chopped fiber glass.

4. A composite according to claim 1 in which the reinforcing material is chopped graphite fiber.

5. A composite according to claim 1 in which the reinforcing material is graphite powder.

6. A composite according to claim 1 in which the reinforcing material is molybdenum disulfide powder.

7. A composite according to claim 1 in which the reinforcing material is aluminum powder.

8. A heat resistant, reinforced composite comprising, in combination, (i) from about 21.5 percent by weight to about percent by weight of a copolyimide consisting essentially of the recurring unit wherein from 10 to 30 percent of said recurring units are those in which R represents and the remainder of said units are those in which R represents a member selected from the group consisting of cH cH 13. A composite according to claim 9 in which the reinforcing material is fiber glass.

14. A composite according to claim 9 in which the reinforcing material is graphitefiber.

15. A composite according to claim 8 in which the reinforcing material is graphite powder.

16. A heat resistant reinforced laminate comprising a plurality of layers of a woven fibrous reinforcement embedded in a polyimide as defined in claim 8.

17. A laminate according to claim 16 wherein the reinforcement is fiber glass cloth.

18. A laminate according to claim 16 wherein the reinforcement is graphite cloth.

19. A laminate according to claim 16 wherein the reinforcement is a high temperature resistant organic fabric.

20. A process for the preparation of a laminate comprising the steps of: (i) impregnating a plurality of layers of a woven fibrous reinforcement with a solution in an organic solvent ofa polyimide as defined in claim 8; (ii) removing the organic solvent from said impregnated layers; and (iii) fusing said plurality of layers under pressure at a temperature at least as high as the glass transition temperature of said polyimide.

21. A process according to claim 20 wherein the woven fibrous reinforcement is fiber glass cloth.

22. A process according to claim 20 wherein the woven fibrous reinforcement is graphite cloth.

23. A process according to claim 20 wherein the woven fibrous reinforcement is a high temperature resistant organic fabric.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4131707 *Nov 8, 1976Dec 26, 1978Ciba-Geigy CorporationStable resin solutions containing compounds having at least one furyl radical
US4292105 *Dec 28, 1978Sep 29, 1981Union Carbide CorporationMethod of impregnating a fibrous textile material with a plastic resin
US4621015 *Mar 7, 1984Nov 4, 1986Long John VLow density, modified polyimide foams and methods of making same
US4894105 *Nov 4, 1987Jan 16, 1990Basf AktiengesellschaftProduction of improved preimpregnated material comprising a particulate thermoplastic polymer suitable for use in the formation of substantially void-free fiber-reinforced composite article
US4897227 *Feb 12, 1988Jan 30, 1990Lenzing AktiengesellschaftProcess for producing high-temperature resistant polymers in powder form
US4898754 *May 5, 1988Feb 6, 1990The Boeing CompanyPoly(amide-imide) prepreg and composite processing
US5017110 *Nov 13, 1989May 21, 1991Lenzing AktiengesellschaftApparatus for producing high-temperature resistant polymers in powder form
US5128198 *Oct 25, 1989Jul 7, 1992Basf AktiengesellschaftProduction of improved preimpregnated material comprising a particulate thermoplastic polymer suitable for use in the formation of a substantially void-free fiber-reinforced composite article
US5151238 *Jun 5, 1989Sep 29, 1992National Research Development CorporationProcess for producing composite materials
US5271889 *Feb 20, 1989Dec 21, 1993Lenzing AktiengesellschaftFlame retardant high-temperature-resistant polyimide fibers and molded articles manufactured therefrom
US5312579 *Jul 30, 1992May 17, 1994The United States Of America As Represented By The United States National Eronautics And Space AdministrationLow pressure process for continuous fiber reinforced polyamic acid resin matrix composite laminates
US5486412 *Dec 16, 1993Jan 23, 1996Lenzing AktiengesellschaftFlame retardant high-temperature-resistant polyimide fibers and molded articles manufactured therefrom
US8313600Aug 17, 2009Nov 20, 2012Sigma-Tek, LlcMethod and system for forming composite geometric support structures
EP0151722A2 *Dec 3, 1984Aug 21, 1985American Cyanamid CompanyProcess for the preparation of thermoplastic composites
WO2006122064A2 *May 8, 2006Nov 16, 2006American Consulting TechnologyVacuum bagging methods and systems
Classifications
U.S. Classification442/147, 528/229, 427/369, 524/600, 428/300.7, 428/408, 428/473.5, 427/371, 523/222, 427/370, 427/384, 427/331
International ClassificationC08L79/00, C08L79/08
Cooperative ClassificationC08L79/08
European ClassificationC08L79/08
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jan 16, 1986ASAssignment
Owner name: DOW CHEMICAL COMPANY, THE, 2030 DOW CENTER, ABBOTT
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:UPJOHN COMPANY, THE,;REEL/FRAME:004508/0626
Effective date: 19851113