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Publication numberUS396661 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 22, 1889
Filing dateFeb 10, 1888
Publication numberUS 396661 A, US 396661A, US-A-396661, US396661 A, US396661A
InventorsAdolph Lijthy
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Stud or other jewelry
US 396661 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

(No Modl.)

A. LUTHY.

STUD OR OTHER JEWELRY. NO. 396,661. Patented Jan. 22, 1889.

.WITNESSES INVENTORI 2 flm'm 5,4111% By his Attorneys. I 6. 7%. CWEQQAQOM N. PETERS. Pnam-mmn w, wnuhinglunfllc.

STATES PATENT trier.

ADOLPH LUTHY, OF NEXV YORK, N. Y., ASSIGNOR TO A. LUTI-IY &

SAME PLACE.

co, or

STUD OR OTHER JEWELRY.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 396,661, dated January 22, 1889.

Application filed February 10, 1888. Serial No. 263,624. (No model.) i

To aZZ whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, ADOLPH LUTHY, of New York city, New York, have invented certain new and useful Imprtwemcnts in Studs or other Jewelry, of which the followin is a specification.

This invention relates to fastenings for se curing studs, ear-rings, solitaires, buttons, or other analogous articles of jewelry to the person or garment of the wearer. It is especially adapted to the class of ear-rings known as solitaires and to studs for shirt-fronts and the like. To the base or back plate of the article of jewelry a stem is connected projecting rearwardly therefrom, and at its opposite end are formed two radial fasteningarms, the one constructed rigidly with said stem and the other mounted to turn or oscillate relatively thereto on an axis concentric, or approximately so, with the longitudinal axis of the stem, so that it may be folded against or in coincidence with the rigid arm or be turned outwardly therefrom a halt-revo lution, or approximately-so. Stops are provided for limiting the relative movement of the two arms and for holding them frictionally in either of the two relative positions. The arms are so shaped and conformed to one another and to the stem that when folded together they constitute apparently but a single arm, which itself is a continuation of the stem, joined to the latter by an easy curve and projecting from it, preferably, at an obtuse angle, so that the insertion of the coinciding arms and the stem into the ear, in the case of an ear-ring, or into an eylet-hole in a shirt-front or other garment of the wearer, is facilitated. After such insertion the two arms are separated and turned outwardly opposite to one another, so that they constitute a T- head for fastening the article of jewelry to the person or garment.

Figure l of the accompanying drawings is a side elevation of an ear-ring or solitaire provided with my invention. Fig. 2 is a rear elevation thereof. Fig. 3 is a rear elevation of the base or back plate and the fastening, showing the two arms slightly separated. Fig. 4 is a similar rear elevation showing the two arms widely separated. Fig. 5 is a diametrical section cut in the plane of the axis of the stem. Fig. 6 is a similar view to Fig. 5, illustrating a modified construction. Figs. 7 and 8 are side elevations illustrating other modified constructions. Fig. 0 is a side elevation of an ear-pendant embodying my invention.

Referring to the several views, let A designate the base or back plateof an article of jewely, being either itself the ornamental portion thereof or being connected to or hearing the ornamental portion, according to any of the constructions commonly heretofore employed. Two such constructions are shown in the drawings, that shown in Figs. 1 and 2 being a solitaire diamond setting, of which the base A constitutes the back plate, and

that shown in Fig. 9 being a pendant, wherein the base A constitutes the head from which the pendant is hung.

A stem, B, is attached to the base A and proj ects perpendicularly and rearwardly therefrom, and on its rear end are two radial arms, 0 and D, of which the arm 0 is rigidly attached to the stem, being formed integrally with it, whereas the arm D is pivotally con nected in such manner as to be frceto oscillate relatively to the arm Con an axis coincident with the central axis of the stem B. The limit of oscillation of the arm D is preferably and approximately one-half of a revolution. In one extreme position it is thrust against and coincides with the arm C, as shown in Figs. 1 and 2, whereas in the other extreme position it is turned outwardly diametrically away therefrom, as shown in Figs. 4 and 5.

The arms C and D are each made halfround, and arranged with their flat faces in the same plane, so that when folded together these faces coincide, and the two arms become apparently a single round arm, of approximately the same diameter as the stem B, and which joins the latter preferably at an obtuse angle and with a rounded bond, as shown in Fig. 1, so that the fastening device constitutes apparently a simple slender elbow of round Wire, which may be readily inserted through the usual hole in the lobe of a ladys ear or through the eyelet-hole in a gentlemans shirt-front or into any analogous perforation. In inserting it the stud or other article is turned so that the arms C D are directed in line with the perforation into which they are to be inserted, and when inserted therein the article is straightened as the stem B is inserted, thereby bringing the arms against the opposite side of the ear or garment, as the case may be. This done, the arms are separated and turned relatively to one another to the positions shown in Figs. 4 and 5, so that they constitute a fastening for retaining the jewelry in place.

The fastening device is so constructed by means of wedging inclines applied to the respective moving parts that when the arms are thus separated and spread apart they are held frictionally in position with sufficient force to prevent their being turned back by any tension ordinarily occurring in use, but not so firmly as to interfere with being folded together by a distinct and intentional manipulation of the fingers. The device is also provided with stops for holding the two arms in coincidence with one another when they are folded together. These results may be accomplished in several different ways, of which I have illustrated a few modifications.

According to my preferred construction the arm C is made thicker at its end a than elsewhere, and this thickened end projects beyond the end of the arm D and has a tangential face or shoulder, 0, formed on it, which when the two arms are folded together coincides with the end (Z of the arm D, which is likewise tangential, so that when the two arms are folded together the abutting of the tangential end cl of the one against the tangential shoulder c on the other not only serves to stop the further relative movement of the two arms, but also, by reason of the tangential position of the faces a and (7, so thatthey wedge tightly together, serves to generate sufficient friction to prevent easy separation of the two.arms. The end a is arranged so that in inserting the arms 0 (1 through the lobe of the car it serves as a guard to keep the comparatively sharp end of the arm D out of contact, with the ear.

The arm D is formed integrally on the rear end of a screw, E, (shown in Fig. 5,) which screws into the threaded interior of the hollow sleeve or stem B. 111 the construction shown in Figs. 1 to 5 this screw is a righthand screw, being relatively unscrewed when,

. the two arms are incoincidence, and screwing in as the arm D is turned outwardly to the position shown in Figs. 4- and 5. When this position is reached, a shoulder, 9, formed at the base of the arm'D, abuts against the larger end or shoulder b of the stem B, as shown in Fig. 5. The adjustment of the parts is such thatwhen the arm D reaches the position shown in Figs. 4 and 5 the shoulderse and b will be in such tight contact as to generate between them sufficient friction to hold the two arms firmly in their relative extended positions. As the arm D is turned back into coincidence with the arm 0 this friction is relieved by the unscrewing of the screw E, so that the shoulders e and b are brought slightly out of contact, as shown. in Fig. 1, where, however, the interstice between them is shown of exaggerated width, it being, in fact, only half the width of the pitch of the screw.

In ear-rings, so called, or, more correctly, ear-studs or solitaires, it is desirable that the arms 0 D after being turned outwardly to T shape be capable of adjustment toward the base A in order that the lobe of the ear may be clamped somewhat firmly between them and the base, so that the solitaire shall not move too freely in the ear. To this end I connect the stem B to the base A adjustably, preferably by externally screw-threading the forward portion of the same and screwing it into a threaded hole in the center of the base, as best shown in Fig. 5. The stem has a head, f, on its front end to limit its movement when screwed outwardly.

After the arms 0 and D have been opened out they are to be held behind the'lobe of the ear with one hand, while with the other hand the wearer will turn the solitaire setting or head, thereby screwing the base A toward the arms 0 D until the ear is confined between them with the desired firmness.

In Fig. (3 is shown a modification wherein this last-described feature is omitted, and wherein the screw E, to which the arm D is fixed, extends entirely through the sleeve B and is fastened at its front end to the base A. Thus the arm D becomes the fixed arm relatively to the base, while the arm 0 turns and screws out or in. In other respects the operation is the same as already described.

\Vhile it is preferable to mount one or other of the arms C or 1) upon a screw which turns in or on the part carrying the other arm,it isnevertheless to be understood that this feais riveted fast to the base A, and the arm 0 is fixed to the rear end of a sleeve, B, which is freely mounted to turn on the stud E. \Vhen the two arms are folded together, they are stopped by the wedging upon one another of their inclined fiat surfaces 0 d, and when turned outwardly, as shown, they are held frictionally in position by the wedging-of an incline, g, on the front end of the sleeve .B against an incline, h, formed in the rear side of the base A, as clearly shown, whereby the shoulders e and b are forced intimately together. The inclines gand h constitute the equivalent of the screw-thread in the preceeding figures in that they approximate to. one face of half a screw-thread. Fig. 8: shows a similar construction, the inclines g and h, however, being at the rear end of the sleeve B in the position occupied by the shoulders e and h in the preceding figures. The stop 0 is the same in this construction as in Figs. 1 to 5.

Fig. 9 shows an ear-pendant, the construe tion being the same as shown in Fig. 6, except that the base A is of different shape.

I am aware that sleeve-buttons and the like have been made wherein the fastening device consists of two arms projecting radially from the stem or shank which passes through the button-hole, one of them being fixed rigidly to the button, and the other one rotating thereon and capable of being folded upon the fixed arm or of being turned diametrically away therefrom; but in all such devices, so far as I am aware, the moving arm has been provided with some sort of spring catch, which, when it reaches its fastening p0 sition, snaps in and retains it there. Such a construction, in addition to being complicated and liable to get out of order, is unsuited for the fastening of ear-rings, studs, and other articles wherein the fastening device is necessarily made very small and slender, in order that it may pass through the small hole in the lobe of the ear or the small eyelet-hole in a shirt-front or other similar reduced opening.

My invention is adapted to supersede the method now most common for fastening carsolitaires, which consists of a screw-shank on the solitaire passing through the ear, and on which is screwed a nut-a fastening which, while it affords a secure hold, is very inconvenient for ladies to use.

As applied to shirt-studs, my invention is adapted to take the place of the screw-studs now commonly used.

I- claim as my invention the improved fastening for studs, ear-rings, solitaires, or other analogous articles of jewelry, defined as follows, substantially as hereinbefore specified, Viz:

1. The combination, with the base, a stem projecting therefrom, and two radial fastening-arms, the one rigid with said stem and the other mounted to turn on the axis of said stem and adapted to fold against the rigid arm or to be turned outwardly therefrom, of stops on the relatively-moving parts to hold the turning arm in coincidence with the rigid one, and inclines on the moving parts, re-.

spectively, to hold said turning arm frictionally in place when turned away from the rigid arm.

2. The combination, with the base and the stem projecting therefrom, of two radial fastening-arms, the one rigid with said. stem and the other mounted to turn on the axis of said stem and adapted to fold against the rigid arm or to turn outwardly therefrom, and the said arms formed with stops to hold them in coincidence, and inclines on the moving parts,

respectively, to hold the turning arm frictionally in place when turned away from the rigid arm.

The combil'lation, with the base and a stem projecting therefrom, of two radial fastening-arms, the one rigid with said stem and the other mounted on a screw engaging said stem and adapted to fold against the rigid arm or be turned outwardly therefrom.

4. The combination, with the base, of the stem projecting therefrom and two fastening arms projecting radially from said stem, the one rigid with said stem and the other mounted to turn relatively thereto, and both being half-round in cross-section and constructed to fit together, whereby when in coincidence they form a lateral continuation of such stem, and their insertion is facilitated.

5. The combination, with the base, of the stem projecting therefrom and two radial fastening-arms projecting from the rear of said stem at an obtuse angle, the one rigid with said stem and the other mounted to turn relatively thereto, and the two adapted to fold together, and constructed when thus coinciding to appear as a continuation of such stem.

6. The combination, with the base and a stem projecting therefrom, of two radial fastening-arms, the one rigid with said stem and the other mounted to turn relatively thereto, the one arm having its end extended beyond tbe other and thickened and formed with a shoulder abutting against the end of the other arm when the two arms are in coincidence.

7. The combination, with the base, of a tubular stem projecting therefrom and engaged therewith, a radial fastening-arm proj eeting rigidly from the rear endof such stem, a screwshank screwing into said stem, and a radial fastening-arm fixed on said shank and adapted to turn therewith and to fold against the rigid arm.

8. The combination, with the base, of a stem projecting therefrom and screwing into the threaded socket therein, whereby it is adj ustable relativelythereto, and two radial fastening-arms, the one rigid with said stem and the other mounted to turn on the axis thereof and to fold against the rigid arm.

ADOLPH LUTl-IY.

\Vitnesses:

J NO. E. GAVIN, ARTHUR (I. FRASER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5020338 *Aug 31, 1989Jun 4, 1991Payne Susan MEarring post for pierced ears
US5076072 *Jul 9, 1990Dec 31, 1991Payne Susan MEarring post for pierced ears
US5201197 *Jun 1, 1992Apr 13, 1993Bakker Johann GPierced earring mount locking member
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA44B1/34