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Publication numberUS401528 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 16, 1889
Filing dateMay 25, 1888
Publication numberUS 401528 A, US 401528A, US-A-401528, US401528 A, US401528A
InventorsMax A. Zurcher
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Railway-car
US 401528 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

(No Model.)

Patented Apr. 16, 1889.

4 m Hm Gnu mu ZW m AA R N PETERS. mmiumg pw. Wflahinglon. n. c.

(No Model.)

4 Sheets-Sheet 2. M. A. ZURGHER.

RAILWAY UAR.

W m m V m .I Q L\ b a w M m (No Model.) 4 Sheets-Sheet 3. M. A. ZURCHER.

RAILWAY GAR.

No. 401,528.. Patented Apr. ,16, 1889.

awvewbo z, 71M 11% @5131; a oha @043 (No Model.)

4 Sheets-Sheet 4. M. A. ZUROHER.

RAILWAY GAR. No. 401,528. Patented Apr. 16, 1889.

UNITED STATES ATENT VFFIFCE,

MAX A. ZURCHER, OF PIIGENIXVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA.

RAILWAY-CAR.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 401,528, dated April 16, 1889.

' Application filed May 25, 1888. Serial No. 275,121. (No model.)

To all whom it may concern.-

Be it known that I, MAX A. ZUROHER, a citizen of the United States, residing at Phoenixville, in the county of Chester and State of Pennsylvania, have invented a new and useful Improvement in Railway- Cars, of which the following is a specification.

My invention relates to improvements in the fioor frame-work of various kinds of railway-cars, and is to a certain extent an improvement upon the invention disclosed in my prior patent granted to me by the United States on the 5th day of June, 1888, No. 384,225that is to say, thein vention disclosed in said patent was directed solely to railwaycar frames of prismatic form, and embodied trussed frames of the peculiar construction therein disclosed and claimed, while the present application is directed solely to trussed floor-frames, and its objects are, first, to devise a skeleton floor-frame for a railway-car which shall be possessed of maximum strength under stress of strains in all directions and be at the same time of minimum lightness, the construction being such that it will sustain loads to be carried under varying conditions and possess rigidity of structure against all strains, whether due to a load, collisions, derailment, or any and all accidents to which cars of this naturcare subject; second, to devise a car-floor frame-work of such strength that it will divide the strains due to the load as nearly possible between the two sets of trucks, and this particularly when the load is concentrated upon the car; third, to provide such a fioor frame-work as will adapt a car for carrying the loads in the nature of long pieces of n'iaterial, which ordinarily require two or more coupled ears; fourth, to provide a car-floor of such a shape and construction properly supported and trussed that it will constitute in itself a receptacle for grain and other material in bulk which by its peculiar inherent coi'istruction in the nature of an inclined or curved floor will materially aid in the unloadingof such material when so shipped in bulk. I accomplish these objects by the statically-constructed car-floor frame hereinafter described, but particularly pointed out in the claims which follow this specification.

My invention will be fully understood by referring to the accompanying drawings, in which like letters of reference wheresoever used represent like part Figures 1 and 2 are side elevations of half of a trussed frame supporting a car-floor. Figs. 3 and 4 are plan views of half the trussing of the lower faces of Figs. 1 and 2. Figs. 5 and (i are plan views of half of the trussing of the upper faces of Figs. 1 and 2. Figs. 7 to ll, inclusive, are side elevations of moditied forms of half of the interior longitudinal trusses which are located between the side trusses shown in Figs. 1 and 2. Figs. 15 to 25, inclusive, are cross-sectional views taken through the several views shown in Figs. 1. to

1. inclusive, and showing several modified forms of lateral or transverse tie-trusses and struts. Figs. 20 and 27 are end views of modified forms of the ends cf the floor-frame body. Fig. 28 is a side elevational view of a modified form of trussed car-floor frame having downwardlyextending body and ends.

Referring now to the drawings in detail, A represents an improved car-floor frame of metal or any analogous material which possesses the required strength.

B B represent the side or exterior longitudinal trusses of the ear-floor frame statically constructed, each composed of a top chord, s, and a bottom chord, s, with vertical web posts or struts .9 which also generally serve as connections for the transverse vibration or tie-trusses 'r. I also provide diagonal web members s" throughout the whole length of the truss, their intersections, if any, being connected either with or without the plates s.

In some cases it might be deemed advisable to omit any or all of the vertical web-posts or any of the web members may form any angle with a horizontal line.

In Fig. 1 I have shown the truss B with a straightlower chord, s,and a curved top chord, s, the greatest girder depth at or near the center of the car, while in Fig. 2 I have shown these chords reversed; but both chords may be curved or expanded, or both may be parallel or equidistant. lhe contour of any of these specially-shaped chords may be that of any single or compound curve, or a substitution thereof of straight lines connected together at various angles to give any required horizontal beam work.

contour or any combination of curves or lines into any one chord. Any of these above-specified chords may be used and combined in any of the various girders of the'car-body. Instead of the open skeleton web, a plate-web may be substituted throughout the entire length of any of the girders or through any fractional portion of said length, as clearly shown at to, Figs. 7 to 14-, inclusive.

To still further increase the rigidity of the two trusses B, I increase their depth at the body-bolsters by extending them downward, as shown in Figs. 1 and 2, and placing them far enough apart that each is outside of the clear workings of the trucks.

Figs. 7 to 14, inclusive, represent the interior longitudinal girders, r, and they are similar in construction to girders B. Any of these girders 1" may be substituted wholly or partly for the girders B, or vice versa, or may onlyextend back from each end part of the way, or may be wholly omitted.

In Figs. 3 to 6, inclusive, I have shown these longitudinal interior trusses, 9", one or more in number, in connection with the exterior longitudinal trusses, B, all rigidly con- 11 ected together by one or more interior transverse-vibration girders and struts, r, similarly constructed, they being of the greatest possible permissible uniform or variable depth at the various points where they are located. When forming the body, bolsters '1' may be of increased strength, or may be a twin or box girder. The end trusses, E, are also statically constructed the same as B, r, and 1* above, and the same modifications may also be used. I have shown these end trusses in Fig. 26 as having a curved top chord, c, and horizontal bottom chord, c, and in Fig. 27 both chords are curved.

Any. or all of the top chords of the various trusses may extend above the floor-level Figs. 1 and 2; but they may be level with it, Figs. '7 to 14, inclusive, or below the same for the whole length or any part of the car-body length. The inclined floors of cars now ordinarily constructed are blocked up with extra materials to proper inclinations on a I avoid this and shape or construct my girders both longitudinally and transversely to support the inclined floors, which are directly laid on the trusses, thereby increasing the strength and at the same time diminishing the weight of the structure.

To increase the strength of the various girders B, r, r, and E, all rigidly and integrally connected together, I use a longitudinal statically-constructed floor truss or trusses, C, Figs. 5 and G, in or at the floor-level, having the girders 'r as web-posts, and web diagonals r or r, or both, all rigidly connected to the girders B, the latter forming the chords thereof, and they may also be connected with any or all of the girders 1'. One or more of the several web constructions shown in both Figs. 5 and 6 maybe used either singly or combined. This floor-trussing 0 may also consist of two or more statical trusses all rigidly and integrally connected together to serve as one truss, wherein the side trusses, B, and girders 0 form their chords, the girders 0' their web-posts, and 0 their web diagonals. (See Fig. 5.) Should its central space not be trussed with diagonal members, which may be the case, 7' must act as a girder in a longitudinal direction to take up the web shear. These trusses G, which are transverse to the car-body, may lie in one plane, and they are shown as situated horizontal in Figs. 15 to 21, inclusive, or they may lie in two or more connecting-planes placed at various angles, or they may be curved convex or concave instead. (See Figs. 22 to 25, inclusive.)

The floor and its trusses .O are horizontal in a longitudinal direction, (Figs. 7, 8, and S), while in Fig. 10 they are inclined toward the center of the car. The same is true for the part between the trucks of Figs. 11 and 12, while from each truckthey incline downward at the end (see Fig. 11) and are horizontal, as shown in Fig. 12.

In Figs. 10,11, and 12, II represents a horizontal line to show more clearly the inclinations of the trusses.

In Figs. 13 and 14 the floor is curved convex; but it may follow the shape of any of the herein-described top chords of the longitudinal trusses B and r, as well as those of the girders '1", under all conditions.

Along some or all of the bottom chords of the girders B, r, and r, I use similarly static ally-constructed longitudinal truss or trusses D, Figs. 3 and 4, they being transversely horizontahFigs. 16,17, 19, and 21 to 25, inclusive, and the same for the one-half of Fig. 18; but the latter has no direct connection with girder r. Fig. 20 shows two adjacent inclined longitudinal trusses, D, having in common the bottom chord of girder 1, While the outer chords also form the bottom chords of girders B. Fig. 15 and the one-half of Fig. 18 show three adjoining statically-constructed longitudinal trusses, D, with common coinciding chords for adjacent trusses. Any of the web constructions shown in Figs. 3 and 4t or Figs. 5 and (J, and as described for the trusses C, may be used singly or any or all combined.

The platforms G (shown in Figs. 1 to 6, inclusive) are extensions of the girders B and r, or a part of either of them, and additional girders, or, may be used, as shown, to give the platforms additional resistance, and any other additional parts, I, may be added, if desired, which will increase the strength of the structure. At the extreme ends of the platform I construct girders or beams g, which may be curved to allow for the movement of the cars around curves. To give these platforms additional strength and to enable the cars to resist the strains due to collision or derailment, I construct at their extreme ends a downwardly-projecting trussed body, 72, Figs. 7, S, and 20, of various designs, being IIO oness. 3

externally trussed and braced in a transverse and longitudinal direction, which may be also internally braced in either direction, singly or combined.

The floor-covering may be of wood, or it An examination of the various trussings,

bracings, counterbracings, and of the various forms of web members and girders shown in the several figures of the drawings will be obvious to any one skilled in the art of trussed devices, and it will be understood that I desire that the scope of the claims which follow this specification shall be broad enough in their nature to include all combinations of trusses which may be connected together so as to constitute a statically trussed floorframe for a railway-car, it being understood that I claim to be the first to devise such an arrangement of trussing for the purposes herein indicated.

I construct the individual members of the various girders in such a manner as to be absolutely rigid, and by this term rigid I desire it to be understood that said parts are so constructed as to resist nearly or equal intensity of compression and tensile strains as of such materials as posse: s great strength such as wrought-iron of great ductility, and of such steel or other metals as have similar characteristics or still greater strength and by making all of their connections and parts rigid and non-adjustable. I use for these various members of metal beams, channels, angles, ties, and other special shapes, as well as bars, plates, or any combination of shapes in the forming of any one individual member, as any one skilled in the art will understand. These various members are connected together rigidly in the same manner as is dis closed in my patent above referred to.

I am aware that it is old in bridge construc tion to combine vertical longitudinal side trusses which are adapted to carry a maximum vertical load with lateral and vibratory braces of such a nature as to resist side strains due to the wind solely; but I am not aware that any combination of such trusses has been devised for resisting strains in all directions, as there would be no necessity for such a construction in bridges. It is the especial function of my invention to be of such universal strength in the lateral top and bottom trusses and other parts as to withstand maximum strains when exerted in all possible directionssuch, for instance, as are due to the load carried by the frame itself during transportation, or such as would result in an actual destruction of the car on overturning, or a similar effect due to collisions, or as will give increased tensile and compressive strength to the car-frame as a whole, thereby permitting a greater number of cars, either loaded or empty, to be drawn without danger of accident.

I am aware that it is old to support a railway-car floor by supporting members each consisting of two or more longitudinal members placed one above the other, mainly or partly connected together by frictional clamping-pieces, and not having a properly-constructed web, while all my connect-ions are of the most positive kind, as is fully explained. Besides, this construction is often additionally hog-chained, as above described.

I am aware that a trussed structure has been devised for carrying heavy artillery, which structure was supported upon a great number of trucks and upon two parallel lines of rails; but such structure was not braced laterally between the vertical trusses of each track, nor was this structure trussed so as to form a statically-trussed body; nor would it in any sense perform the functions for which my improved car-floor frame is-devised.

I am also aware that it is old to support a railway car floor by trussed or hog-chained vertical beams having adjustable trussed rods solely designed to take up the tension, the beam itself having a solid or plate web and pa allel flanges, or said beam being composed of a lattiee-girder in general outline with parallel flanges; but. such construction does not possess the peculiarities claimed for my improved car-floor frame.

I am also aware that it is old to construct cars with false floors which are inclined lengthwise from the ends toward the center, or such as are inclined transversely and being lowest at the center, or both of such forms'combined. It is also old to construct cars having hipped floors formed of two planes, the highest portion being lengthwise of the cars.

Having thus d eseribed my invent-ion, what I claim, and desire to secure by letters Patent of the United States, is-

1. A statically constructed floor framework for a railway-car, consisting of two or more vertical longitudinal girders, all of the individual members and details of which are rigid and non-adjustable, each having a top and bottom chord and web members throughout, said parts being integrally connected together at or near their tops and bottoms by longitudinal lateral tie-trusses of similar constructions, substantially as described.

2. A statically constructed floor framework for a railway-car, consisting of two or more vertical longitudinal girders connected together at or near their tops and bottoms by longitudinal trusses adapted to resist lateral strains, in combination with one or more transversevibration or tie trusses, having its greatest permissible depth at each location,

ITO

and all of said trusses integrally connected together in such manner as to be rigid and non-adj ustable, substantially as described.

3. A staticallyconstructed railwaycar floor-frame consisting of the combination of the rigid non-adjustable side trusses, B, having top and bottom chords and Web members throughout, and one or more transverse tie or vibration trusses or girders, r, similarly constructed, both of said sets of girders having common struts and connecting members 5 substantially as described.

4. A statically-constructed car-floor frame consisting of side, top, and bottom girders, all of the members and details of which are continuous, rigid, and non-adjustable, the Whole being so arranged that the longitudinal top truss or trusses form the support of the car-floor, substantially as described.

5. A trussed floor-frame for a railway-car, consisting of substantially vertical longitudinal trusses having inclined top chords on which the floor rests, substantially as described.

6. A trussed floor-frame for a railway-car, consistin of substantially vertical longitudinal exterior and interior trusses having inclined top chords on which the floor rests, substantially as described.

7. A trussed floor-frame for a railway-car, consisting of substantially vertical longitudinal trusses the top chords of which are inclined to carry the floor, in combination with lateral transverse bracing trusses, the whole being integrally connected together, substantially-as described.

8. A railway-car floor-frame consisting of longitudinal girders or trusses united by a longitudinal top truss or girder and lateral transverse bracing or tie trusses or girders, all of said trusses being constructed and connected together to resist strains in all directions, substantially as described.

9. A railway-car floor-frame consisting of longitudinal girders or trusses united by a longitudinal bottom truss or girder and lateral transverse bracing or tie trusses or girders, all of said trusses being constructed and connected together to resist strains in all directions, substantially as described.

MAX A. ZURCIIER.

Witnesses:

(7. J. KINTNER, J. F. QUINN.

Referenced by
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US20040221764 *May 9, 2003Nov 11, 2004National Steel Car Ltd.Dropped deck center beam rail road car with shallow center sill
US20040234353 *Mar 23, 2004Nov 25, 2004National Steel Car LimitedCenter beam car with deep upper beam structure
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Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationB61D9/06