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Publication numberUS401687 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 16, 1889
Filing dateJul 13, 1888
Publication numberUS 401687 A, US 401687A, US-A-401687, US401687 A, US401687A
InventorsEdward E. Claussen
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Paper bag
US 401687 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

t e e MW e N E S S U A L O H B PAPER BAG.

Patented Apr. 16, 1889.

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Inventor:

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E. E. OLAUSSEN.

PAPER BAG.

N0.- 401,687. Patented Apr. 16, 1889.

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4 N E S S U A L O H H PAPER BAG.

No. 401,687; PatentedApr. 16, 1889*.

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N. PETERS, Vhalc-Lhhcgrapher. Washington, n.c.

4 Sheets-Sheet 4.

(Model.)

B. E. GLAUSSEN.

I PAPER BAG. No. 401,687. Patented Apr. 16, 1889.

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UNITED Starts EDVARD E. CLAUSSEN, OF HARTFORD, CONNECTICUT.

PAPER BAG.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 401,687, dated April 16, 1889. Application filed July 13, 1888. Serial No. 279,829. (Model) To all whom, it may concern.-

Be it known that I, EDWARD E. CLAUssnN, of Hartford, Connecticut, have invented a new and useful Improvement in Paper Bags, of which the following description and claim constitute the specification, and which is illustrated by the accompanying foursheets of drawings. V

Figure l of the drawings is a view of the upper side of a flat paper tube suitable for making the sides of asatchel-bottom bag, an d Fig. 2 is a view of the lower end of the same. Fig. 3is aview of arectangular piece of paper, which is larger in all its dimensions than the bottom of the bag when the bag is opened out, and which is provided with paste upon its presented borders outside of the limits of the size of the bottom of the bag to be made. Fig. 4 is a view of the blank of Figs. 1 and 2 after the diamond fold, which is the first fold in the process of making the bag from the tube of Fig. 1, has been properly produced, and after the rectangular piece of Fig. 3 has been pasted at one of its longer borders to the outer side of the lower end of the blank thus folded. Fig. 5 is aviewof what is shown in Fig. at after the rectangular piece has been folded over and down upon the bottom of the diamond fold. Fig. 6 is a fragmentary view of what is shown in Fig. 5 after the upper half of the diamond fold and the upper half of the rectangular piece have been folded over and down upon the lower halves thereof. Fig.7 is a central longitudinal section of what is shown in Fig. 6. Fig. 8 is a view of what is shown in Fig. 6 after the pasted border of the upper half of the rectangular piece has been folded over the edge of the upper half of the diamond fold and down upon the border thereof. Fig. 9 is a view of what is shown in Fig. 8 after the four corners of the rectangular piece have been folded over upon the ad 3' acent surfaces of the two halves of the diamond fold, respectively, and the pasting of the rectangular piece of Fig. 3 to the tubular blank of Fig. 1 is thus completed. Fig. 10 is a View of what is shown in Fig. 9 after the upper half of the satchel-bottom of the bag has been turned back, as upon a hinge, on the crease which unites it to the lower half of the satchel-bottom, so as to present the entire outside of that bottomto view, and the completed bag has thus been put into proper form for being made with other such bags into a package for shipment and sale. Fig. 11 is a View of the reverse side of the bag of Fig. 10, and Fig.- 12 opened out into a rectangular form. Fig. 13 is a View of the upper side, and Fig. 14; is a view of the lower end, and Fig. 15 is a view of the right-hand edge, of a tucked paper tube suitable for making the sides of a square bottom paper bag. Fig. 16 is a view of a rectangular piece of paper larger in all its dimensions than the bottom of the bag to be made and having its presented borders outside the limits of the size of the bottom of that bag provided with paste. Fig. 17 is a View of a rectangular piece of paper identical with that of Fig. 16, except that its end borders are narrower than its side borders, instead of being wider than they are. Fig. 18 is a view of the blank of Fig. 13 after the rectangular piece of Fig. 16 has been attached by the paste on its upper border to the outer border of the lower end of the lower thickness of the blank of Fig. 13. Fig. 19 is a 'view of what is shown in Fig. 18 after the lower half of the rectangular piece has been folded over on a central longitudinal crease therein and its lower border has been pasted down to the outer border of the lower end of the upper thickness of theblank of Fig. 13, and after the compound blank thus produced has been clasped between the two members of a pair of clamps the workin -surfaces of which correspond in width with the distance between the inner bends of the tucks of the blank of Fig. 13 and extend lengthwise of that blank along its lower portion, and extend also across the doubled rectangular piece. Fig. 20 is a view of the lower end of what is shown in Fig. 1.). Fig. 21 is a view of what is shown in Fig. 19 when the tucks in the edges of the blank are being separated like the leaves of a book, and the ends of the folded rectangular piece are thereby being opened out. Fig. 22 is a view of the lower end of What is shown in Fig. 21. Fig. is a view of what is shown in Fig. 21 after the tucks in the edges of the tubular blank have been entirely separated, so that the two halves of each of them occupy the same plane and are pressed against the is a view of that bag sides of the clamps, and after the ends of the rectangular piece have been folded into triangular forms and the pasted end borders thereof pressed against the flat outer border of the lower ends of the thus opened-out tucks, respectively. Fig. 24 is a view of the lower end, and Fig. 25 is a view of the righthand side, of what is shown in Fig. 23. Fig. 26 is a View of the blank of Figs. 23, 24, and 25 after the opened-out tucks thereof have been returned to the position shown in Fig. 19 and have carried with them, when shutting together along their central longitudinal creases, the triangular folds in the ends of the rectangular piece. Fig. 27 is identical with Fig. 26, except that it presupposes the use of the rectangular blank of Fig. 17 instead of the rectangular blank of Fig. 16, and shows the difference resulting from that use. Fig. 28 is a view of what is shown in Fig. 26 after the corners of the rectangular piece of Fig. 16 have been folded over upon the sides of the tubular part of the blank of Fig. 26 and the bag has thus been completed. Fig. 30 is a cross-section, just above the bottom, of the bag of Fig. 32; and Fig. 32 is a view of the bag opened out into a rectangular form. Figs. 29, 31, and 33 bear the samerelations toeFig. 27 that Figs. 28',- 30, and 32 bear to Fig. 26. Fig. 34 is a tucked tubular blank with a rectangular piece pasted thereto, and it corresponds in all respects with what is shown in Fig. 19, except that no clamp is yet applied thereto, and except that it shows a lateral and two diagonal broken lines, along which certain folds are to be made in producing the completed bag of Figs. 47 and 48, which are not made in producing the completed bag of Fig. 28 orthat of Fig. 29. Fig. 35 is aview of what is shown in Fig. 34 after that portion of the upper ply of the tubular part of that figure which is below the lateral broken line therein has been turned back upon that line, .as upon a hinge, and folded down upon that portion of that ply which is immediately above that line, and has carried with it those portions of the rectangular piece which in Fig. 34 are below the lower edges of the tucked tubular piece, and has transformed those portions from the folded position of Fig. 34 to the flatposition of Fig. 35. The changes from Fig. 34 to Fig. 35 also include the making of a right-angled triangular fold from the lower end of .each of the two inwardly-inclined tucks of the blank of Fig. 34. Fig. 36 is a View of the right-hand edge of what is shown in Fig. 35. Fig. 37 is a view of what is shown in Fig. 35 after the upper half of the rectangular bottom of the blank shown in that figure has been folded back along a longitudinal central crease and down upon the lower half thereof. Fig. 38 is a view of the blank of Fig. 37 after it has been clasped between the two members of the pair of clamps heretofore described, and when the side tucks of the blank of Fig. 37 are being opened out. Fig. 39 is a view of the lower end of what is shown in Fig. 38.

Fig. 40 is a view of what is shown in Fig. 38 after the side tucks thereof have been entirely opened out, so as to occupy the same plane and be pressed against the sides of the clamps. Fig. 41 is a view of the lower end of what is shown in Fig. 40. Fig. 42 is a view of what is shown in Fig. 40 after the outer ends of the rectangular piece have been pressed and pasted back upon the outer borders of the lower ends of the two opened-out tucks, respectively. Fig. 43 is a view of the lower end of what is shown in Fig. 42, and Fig. 44 is a view of the right-hand side thereof. Fig. 45 is a view of the blank of Fig. 42 after the clamps have been removed therefrom and the side tucks thereof have been folded together again. Fig. 46 is a view of the blank of Fig. 45 after the corners of the rectangular piece have been folded over and pasted down upon the four outer corners, respectively, of the body of the bag. Fig. 47 is a view of the bag shown in Fig. 46 after that part of the upper ply of the tubular portion of that bag which is below the lateral broken line of that figure has been turned back upon that line, as upon a hinge, and folded down upon that portion of that ply which is immediately above that broken line, and has carried with it that portion of the rectangular piece which in Fig. 46 is folded inward between the upper and the lower ply of the tubular part of the blank, and has also carried the right-angled triangular folds at the bottoms of the side tucks from folded positions between those two plies to flat positions under the rectangular bottom of the bag of Fig. 47, and the bag of that figure has been thus completed. Fig. 48 is a view of the reverse side of the bag of Fig. 47, and Fig. 49 is a View of that bag opened out into a rectangular form.

The method of making the bottom of the bag of Fig. 10 is as follows: The lower end of the flat tube 1 is folded into the diamond form 2 by means already well known in the art of making satchel-bottom paper bags, and the rectangular piece 3, having been supplied with paste upon its presented borders, as indicated in Fig. 3, is attached by the paste on one of those borders to the under border of the lower side of that diamond fold, as shown in Fig. 4, and is then turned over the lower edge of the diamond fold and down upon its presented side, as shown in Fig. 5-. Thereupon the upper half of the diamond fold 2 and the upper half of the rectangular piece 3 are turned back upon a central longitudinal crease and folded down upon the lower halves thereof, as shown in Figs. 6 and 7. Then the lower border of the rectangular piece 3 isfolded over the edge of the upper half of the diamond fold and pasted down upon the outer border thereof, as shown in Fig.8. The corners 4 and 5 of the upper half of the rectangular piece and correspond ing corners, 6 and-7, of the lower half of that piece are then folded over upon the outsides of the two halves of the diamond fold, re-

spectively, and pasted down thereon, as indi cated in Fig. 9, and, lastly, the upper one of the two halves of the satchel-bottom is turned from the place it occupies over the half thereof in Fig. 9 to the position it occupies over the lower part of the body of the bag in Fig. 10, and the satchel-botton1 bag of that figure is thus completed.

The method of making the bottom of the bag of Fig. 28 is as follows: The tube 8,which is provided with the tucks 9 and 10, has a rectangular piece, 11, attached to the outer border of the lower end of its under ply, as shown in Fig. 18. Then that rectangular piece is folded upward upon a central longitudinal line, and that one of its borders which is lowest in Fig. 18 is pressed and pasted down upon the outer border of the lower end of the upper ply of the tucked tube 8. The compound blank thus produced isthen clasped between the members 13 and 14. of the abovedescribed clamp, as shown in Figs. 19 and 20. Then the tucks 9 and 10 are opened out through the position shown in Figs. 21 and 22 to that indicated in Figs. 23 and 24, and the right-angled triangular folds 15 and 16 are made of the ends of the rectangular piece 11, and the longer sides of those triangular folds, which were theretofore the ends of the rectangular piece 11 are pasted down upon the outer borders of the lower ends of the opened-out tucks 9 and 10, respectively, as indicated inFig. 25. The two parts of the tucks 9 and 10, respectively, are then closed together into their former positions, carrying with them the corresponding two halves of the triangular folds 15 and 16, respectively, thus tucking those triangular folds inward to constitute downward eontinuations of the tucks 9 and 10, and, lastly, the corners 17 and 18 and the corresponding corners, 19 and 20, of the triangular folds 15 and 16 are folded over the four outer bends of the tucked tube 8, and pasted down upon the outsides of that tube, as indicated in Figs. 28, 30, and 32. The difference between the bag of Fig. 29 and the bag of Fig. 28 consists in the use of the rectangular piece 12 instead of the rectangular piece 11. That substitution results in making the longer sides of the rectangular piece extend upward upon the upper and lower plies of the tucked tube 8 farther than its shorter sides extend upward upon the opened-out tucks 9 and 10 of that tube, re spectively, and necessitates the turning of the corners 17, 18, 19, and 20 inwardly upon the surfaces of the tucks of the bag of Fig. 27, instead of outwardly upon the outsides of the upper and lower ply, respectively, of the tucked tube 8, as shown in Fig. 28. There are no folds in the bag of Fig. 28 or in that of Fig. 29, except continuous longitudinal tucks in the edges thereof and the single lat eral bend which unites the upper and the lower ply of each of those bags at the extreme lower end thereof. When the bag of Fig. 28

or that of Fig. 29 is opened out into a rectangular form, the edges of its rectangular bot tom are defined for the first time by the consequent bending of the paper which originally composed therectangular piece over the lower edges of the piece which originally composed the tucked tube, the lower borders of the latter having been stiffened to promote that defining by the pasting of the borders of the rectangular piece thereon.

The method of making the bottom of the bag of Fig. 457 follows the method of making the bag of Fig. 32 as far as uniting the rectangular piece to the tucked tube, as shown in Fig. 19 and also in Fig. 34. Thereupon the method of making the bottom of the bag of Fig. 47 proceeds as follows: That part of the upper ply of the tucked tube 8 which is below the broken line a b of Fig. 34: is turned back upon that line,'as upon a hinge, and folded down upon that portion of that ply which is immediately above that line, and carries with it the upper half of that portion of the rectangular piece 11 which in Fig. 4.6 is folded inward between the upper and the lower ply of the tucked tube 8. This operation is performed by placing any fiat implement across the tucked tube 8, so that its lower edge shall coincide with the broken line a b, and so that such implement shall press the tucked tube down upon any fiat surface beneath it, and by holding the lower ply of the tucked tube 8 and the lower, thicknesses of the tucks 9 and 10 at the place where that ply and those thick nesses join, near the lower ends thereof, firmly down upon that flat surface, and by clasping the upper ply of the tucked tube 8 and the upper thicknesses of the tucks 9 and 10, respectively, where that ply and those thicknesses join, near the lower ends thereof, together with the upper pasted border of the rectangular piece 11, and carrying the points thus clasped upward through a semicircular arc of which the broken line a b is the center. The operation described in the last sentence also produces the inwardly-extending triangular folds 21 and 22, which triangular folds are formed of paper of the lower ends of the tucks 9 and 10, respectively, and which lie immediately under the rectangular piece 11, as shown in Fig. 35. Then the part which was lately folded upward on the line a b is returned to its former position, carrying with it the upper half of that portion of the triangular piece 11 which is presented to View in Fig. 35, and carrying with it, also, the upper halves of the triangular folds 21 and 22, so that those triangular folds and that portion of the rectangular piece 11 are tucked upwardly as far as they will extend between the upper and the lower ply of the tucked tube 8, as shown in Fig. 37. Then the blank of Fig. 37 is clasped between the members 13 and 14 of the clamp, as shown in Figs. 19 and 20 and also in Figs. 38 and 39. Thereupon the tucks 9 and 10 are opened out to theirfullest extent and pressed against the sides of that clamp in Figs. 38 and through the positions shown IIO 39 to the positions shown in Figs. 40 and 41. That operation also opens out in opposite directions and into triangular forms the opposite portions of the tucked-in rectangular piece 11, and also opens out the two halves of the triangular folds 21 and 22, so as to make the paper which composed them occupy a continuous plane in common with the paper which composed the tucks 9 and 10, respectively. The extreme ends of the rectangular piece 11 are thus made to constitute the temporary projections 23 and 24, and those projections are then folded upward and pressed and pasted against the outer borders of the lower ends of those narrower sides of the blank, which were made by opening out the tucks 9 and 10 and the triangular folds 21 and 22, respectively. Then the tucks 9 and 10 are returned to their former closed position, carrying with them the two halves of the triangular folds 21 and 22 and the two halves of the now pasted-down projections 23 and 24 into the position indicated in Fig. 45. Then the corners 25 and 26 and the corresponding corners, 27 and 28, of the rectangular piece 11, which constitute, also, the still unpasted extremities of the projections 23 and 24, are folded outward across the lower ends of the four outer bends of the tucks 9 and 10, and pasted upon the outsides of the upper and lower plys of the tucked tube 8, as indicated in Fig. 46. The bag of Fig. 46 has inwardlyinclined side tucks similar to those of the bag of Fig. 28, and it also has an inwardly-inclined bottom tuck, which the bag of Fig. 28 does not have. The bag of Fig. 47 is completed by opening out that inwardly-inclined bottom tuck, and that opening out is accomplished by placing a flat implement across the bag of Fig. 46 immediately above the broken line a b and pressing that implement down upon any fiat surface beneath the bag, and then pressing the under ply of the bag, together with the under thicknesses of the two side tucks therein, near the lower ends thereof, down upon that surface, and then clasping the upper ply of the bag, together with the upper thicknesses of the side tucks therein, and carrying the points thus clasped upward in the semicircular arc of which the line a b is the center. Thus the bag of Figs. 47 and 48 of that improvement, and also to show the public how to apply it to a variety of paper ba s.

This invention differs from that shown in Letters Patent of the United States No.

242,664, for a paper bag, granted to O. A. S. Lockwood June 7, 1881, in that Lockwoods rectangular flap is much smaller than the bottom of the bag and is placed Within all four of the folds of that bottom, whereas my rectangular piece is much larger than the bottom of my bag and constitutes the whole of that bottom, and also re-enforces the lower borders of all four sides of my bag.

This invention differs also from that shown in Letters Patent of the United States No. 333,523, granted to William H. Honiss January 5, 1886, in that Honisss rectangular piece is substantially identical in size with the bottom of his bag and is placed between two pairs of folds made in the lower end of the paper tube which constitutes the body of that bag, whereas my rectangular piece is much larger than the bottom of my bag and constitutes the whole of that bottom, and also re-enforces the lower borders of all four of the sides of my bag.

These new features of my improvement admit of giving the bottom a self-defining edge all around to facilitate the filling of the bag in such a way that when being filled it will stand alone, and likewise my improvement closes all pockets which might otherwise exist for the reception and consequent waste of the substance placed in the bag, and in these respects it is equal to the bag of Honiss and superior to that of Lockwood; and my invention constitutes an improvement over both Lockwoods and Honisss, and over all other paper bags known to me, in that all forms of paper bags to which it is applied are provided with perfectly plain unfolded flat bottoms and are re-enforced all around the lower borders of their sides. The first of these peculiar merits much diminishes the danger of the bottom of a filled bag being torn open by catching upon any projection from the surface of a bench or other place upon which it may be standing or along which it may be moved, and the second of these merits gives additional strength to the bag where additional strength is wanted and has heretofore been wanting.

I claim as my invention.

A paper bag the bottom of which consists of a separate rectangular piece of paper larger in all its dimensions than the cross-section of the bag, and the borders of which rectangular piece of paper are pasted to unequal extents to the lower borders of the sides of the bag, and the corners of which rectangular piece of paper are folded over and pasted to sides of the body of the bag, substantially as described in the foregoing specification, and shown in Figs. 9, 12, 28, 32, 48, and 49 of the accompanying drawings.

Hartford, Connecticut, July 10, 1888.

EDWARD E. CLAUSSEN.

Witnesses:

ALBERT H. WALKER, JOHN H. KIRKHAM.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2621757 *Nov 28, 1947Dec 16, 1952Electrolux CorpExtendible and collapsible filter bag
US3195801 *Apr 16, 1962Jul 20, 1965St Regis Cons Packaging LtdBlock bottom bag
US4284229 *Sep 6, 1979Aug 18, 1981Windmoller & HolscherReclosable cross-bottom sack
US7217032 *Mar 18, 2003May 15, 2007Nestec S.A.Container for housing product and method for making same
DE1014829B *Jun 5, 1953Aug 29, 1957Herkules Papiersackfabriken BrVorrichtung und Verfahren zum Bekleben der Boeden von Papiersaecken mit Deckblaettern
DE1142100B *Sep 25, 1959Jan 3, 1963Behn Verpackung ErwinKreuzbodensack aus Papier oder Kunststoff mit einem Bodenverschlussblatt und Verfahren zu seiner Herstellung
DE1214076B *Feb 1, 1962Apr 7, 1966Hans LissnerVerfahren zum Herstellen von im befuellten Zustand etwa prismatische Form aufweisenden Saecken
DE1270787B *Nov 7, 1962Jun 20, 1968Windmoeller & HoelscherKunststoffsack mit mindestens einem durch zwei Seitenumschlaege gebildeten Boden sowie Verfahren und Vorrichtung zu seiner Herstellung
DE202009007915U1Jun 5, 2009Aug 20, 2009Worff, Herwig, Dipl.-Ing.Sack
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationB65D31/00