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Publication numberUS403659 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 21, 1889
Publication numberUS 403659 A, US 403659A, US-A-403659, US403659 A, US403659A
InventorsWilliam Good
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Axle-lubricator
US 403659 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

{No Model.)

W. GOOD.

AXLE LUBRIGATOR.

No. 403,659. Patented May 21, 1889.

UNITED STATES ATENT OFFICE.

\VILLIAM GOOD, OF HOUSTON, TEXAS.

AXLE-LUBRICATOR.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 403,659, dated May 21, 1889.

Application filed November 6,1888. Serial No. 290,058. (No model.)

T 0 all whom it may concern/.-

Be it known that I, ILLIAM GOOD, a citizen of the United States, residing at Houston, in the county of Harris and State of Texas, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Axle or Journal Lubricators; and I do hereby declare that the followingis a full, clear, and exact description of the invention, which will enable others skilled in the art to which it appertains to make and use the same, referencebei n g had to the accompanying drawings, which form a part of this specification.

This invention relates to axle or journal lubricators. The object is to produce an axle or journal lubricator which shall be of such construction that it will keep the bearings of an axle or journal or shaft thoroughly lubricated at all times, thereby preventing the same becoming heated and swelling; furthermore, to produce an axle-lubricator which shall be simple of construction, efficient and durable in use, and which may be made and applied to any axle or shaft at but a slight expense.

WVith these objects in view the invention resides in an axle or journal lubricator consisting of a box provided with bearings in which the axle works, and with a cellar below the saidbearings for the reception of the waste for containing the lubricant furthermore, in the combination, with the said box, of a frame in which the box fits, the same being provided with screws for elevating or depressing the box, whereby it may be kept always in contact with the axle or journal, and, finally, in the various novel details of construction, as will be hereinafter fully described in the specification, illustrated in the drawings, and pointed out in the claim.

In the accompanying drawings, forming part of this specification, and in which like letters of reference indicate corresponding parts, Figure 1 is a perspective view of the box, showing the cellar for containing the waste, the bearings in which the axles revolve, and the portion of the cellar designed to fit in the frame. Fig. 2 is a perspective view of the frame in which the box fits, showing the same provided with cross-pieces on its bottom for carrying the set-screws for forcing the box up against the axle or journal.

Fig. 3 is a longitudinal sectional view of the same, showing its peculiar construction.

Referring to the drawings, A designates the box, which may be 'constructedof any suitable metal, but preferably of brass or castiron. This box is made hollow in order to form the cellar 1, in which the waste for containing oil or other lubricant is placed, and the ends are cut out, as shown at 3, to form bearings for the axle 4 to work in. The lower portion of this box is made smaller than the upper portion, as shown at 5, in order that when it is placed within the frame B the walls of the frame and box will be on the same plane, thereby presenting the appearance of a solid box.

The frame B,in which the box is placed,is designed to be secured upon the engine or cartruck in any suitable manner immediately beneath the axle. To the lower side of this frame are secured two or more cross-pieces, 6, provided with suitable openings for the reception of set-screws 7, carrying jam-nuts 8. These set-screws extend through the crosspieces and bear against the bottom 9 of the box, so that by turning them the box will be moved up as far as desired and held in position by forcing the jam-nuts up against the cross-pieces. The bottom portion of the box is made to lit snugly within the frame, so that when the set-screws are turned up to force the box against the axle it will be prevented from rocking upon the ends of the same.

Having now described the different parts of my device, I will proceed to show its method of operation and also the advantages it has over those in common use.

I11 order to understand thoroughly the advantage this axle-lubricator possesses over those in ordinary use, it will be necessary to describe he former briefly. The cellars or boxes which are usually employed upon engine or car trucks are made in a solid piece, and as the brass in the upperbox wears away the lower box is proportionately removed therefrom, thereby removing the waste in the cellar from contact with the axle, thus preventing the axle being supplied with a proper amount of oil and resulting in what is known as hotboxes and hot journals. This obstacle can only be obviated either by bushing the boxes or by placing liners under the same to raise them to the proper height; but it will be seen readily that this invention overcomes all these difficulties, for when the upper box becomes worn away by turning the set-screws the box can be forced up against the axle, thereby keeping the waste in constant contact'with the same.

It will thus be seen that by constructing an axle-lubricator in the manner describedin this specification an exceedingly simple and effective device will be produced, that all danger of hot boxes or swelling of the axle will be obviated, and that it maybe applied to any engine or car axle at but a small cost.

Having thus fully described my'invention,

What '1 claim as new, and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is

In an axle-lubricator, the combination of a frame, cross-pieces secured therein, abox having its lower portion reduced, to fit in the frame and its upper portion provided with a cellar and bearings above the cellar, and set- ,screws in the cross-pieces to elevate or depress the box, substantially as described.

WILLIAM GOOD.

Witnesses:

HENRY F. F snnn, O. E. KINDINGSFELDER'.

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Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationB61F15/04