Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS414748 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 12, 1889
Publication numberUS 414748 A, US 414748A, US-A-414748, US414748 A, US414748A
InventorsUiarlfs K. Mkntlkv
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
mkntlkv
US 414748 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

. BENTLEY. SOALLOPED BALL SUSHION.

(No Model.)

. Patented Nov. 12, 1889.

WITNESSES UNI'IED STATES PATENT ()rrtcn.

SCALLOPED BALL. CUSHION.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 414,748, dated riovnn'oy; 12, 1889.

Application iilctl llpiil 19, 1889. filn'ial No. 30?,648. lNu models llo it known that. l, (innnnns l llnn'rnnr, residing althe oil-y of New York, counlyand Stale of New York, have invented an lniproved Scalloped llall (ushiom of which the following is a full, clear, and exact descriplion.

My invention relates to a cushion of transversely-sealloped general form and designed more especially for use as an ornament or as a pillow for a sofa, folding chair, or other piece of furniture; and the inve-ntioi'i has for its object to provide such a cushion made in a manner to retain or resume its scalloped melon-like form however it may be pressed or roughly handled in use, the article being easily made, inexpensive, and durable.

Reference is to be had to theaccompanying drawings, forming a pnrtiof this specification, and in which similar letters of rcfercnccindirate corresponding parts in all the views.

Fignre1 is a plan View of two pieces of fabric forming the casing of one exterior segmental section of the cushion, one fabric being partly broken away. Fig. 2 shows how these two fabrics are folded and stretched into crescent form. Fig. 3 shows how the inner fabric is reduced in area and its center cut to make an opening to admit a stuffing material. Fig. 4 shows all the double-walled segmental sections of the cushion connected together in a bag or sack. Fig. 5 shows the finished cushion with a draw-cord applied to round its e..ds into the preferred melon-like form; and Fig. 3 shows how four pieces of fabric of elliptical form may be stitched together at one edge to make adjacent connected edges of the covers or walls of two segmental sections of the cushion.

I will describe one of my improved cushions as made with walls of muslin, silk, or other suitable woven fabric; but I am not restricted as to material; neither am I limitcd to the form of scalloped cushion shown, as it may be made in practically round general shape, or may be more or less elongated or elliptical and have either sharp or rounded ends, as may be preferred.

The cushion may be made with any preferred number of segmental sections, which, when joined, givca general scalloped rounded form to the article. I show it made with six exterior segmental sections, giving n nonl. altracblvoappearance. Hut-hol'iIii-sosognlontn| sections A is madowith uvnsingi-ousisl ingol' two pieces (t (1?, of suitable fabric, and prol erably cut on a true bias, and when the eusln ion is llohavoqnilean elongatedgeneral form these two fabrics will have I he elliptical shape shown in Fig. l of the drawings. 'lhesc fabrics (1 (.1 are sewed together at n. entirely around their margins, and then are folded once, which gives them the form indicated by dotted lines in Fig. 2 of the drawings, whereupon they are stretched each way from the center into the crescent or curved form shown in full lines in said figure, the bias cutof the fabrics allowing them to lake and keep this shape. The fabrics are stretched by press ing one hand onto them at the doubled edge and then drawing them around by the other hand into the longitudimtlly conrexcd or crescent form shown, the strel ching bei n g don o from the lengthwise center of the folded fabrics toward each end of them by a stcp-bystep holding by one hand and drawing or pulling around by the otherhand. The area of the inner side wall or fabric a is then recluccd. This may be done by pasting lapped parts of it together; but I accomplish this, preferably, by drawing the inner fabric a? from the enter one a and folding it to its transverse center from end to end, and then stitching it at a a" toward the center from both ends, and as shown in Fi 3 of the drawings, whereupon the doubled edge of this fabric (L2, outside of the place a left unstitched at the lengthwise center of the fabric, is slit or clipped off to produce an opening ll, through which the exterior wall sections or segments of the cushion may afterward be filled with feathers, hair, oranyother suitable stufling material.

Either before or after the segmental ens ings of the cushion-sections have been reduced in area and prepared for filling by opening them at. ll the casings are connected to each other along the first marginal lines of stitching a, and preferably by sewing, and so as to form a double walled bag or sack C of the ovoid or globular general form shown in Fig. l of the drawings, and which will be left open at D at the last seam to provide for afterward filling the interior of the cushion with a stul'tingz; material, as presently explained. All l the segmental casings are next tilled through their slits or openings It with stul'ling material, and these openings will then preferably be closed by sewing or otherwise. Alter all the segmental sections are tilled the bag is turncd inside out, which brings the larger l'accd t'abries o. ol the sections A outside and their reduced side walls d" inside, and conceals the marginal seam edges left by the original stitching-s at u. and n,and also bythe sewing connecting the several sections. The interiorchamber of the bag is next lillcd through the opening I) with some suitable stul'ling material, and this opening or scam is sewed up by bliml-stitehing it necessary, and the cushion is now complete it it is to have pointed ends, as indicated by the dotted lines in l ig. 5 of the drawings. I prefer, however, to run a dmW-cord E through the longitudi nal center of the cushion and draw in its up posite pointed ends, which will be held in by hnotting the cord or otherwise, and thereby producing a cushion of melon-like l'orm having rounded ends, as shown in full lines in Fig. 5, and made up of separate segmental sections, each of which is individually filled or stult'ed, while they all collectively form the walls of a cushion bag or sack, the interior of which is separately filled or stutt'ed. It is obvious that by this construction the down, feathers, or other material filling the exterior segmental sections of the bag is prevented from shifting from part to part of it; hence I the peculiar scalloped. form of the cushion is retained or resumed however roughly it may be pressed or knocked about in use.

It is manifest that the interior chamber of the cushion need not be filled when the tinished article is to be more forornament than use; but when it is designed for a sofa or chair cushion or pillow it is desirable for the comfort of the person using itthat this inner chamber be filled as a re-enforce to the exterior separately filled segmental sections, which, however, would keep the cushion in scalloped general form without this interior chamber being filled when pressure on the cushion was relaxed.

I am not limited to stitching two pieces a together at one edge, as I may stitch together at one edge four pieces of fabric a of elliptical form, and thus make adjacent connected edges of two segment-a1 sections, the other edge of each of which being afterward formed by sewing the free edges of two of the fabrics together, as will readily be understood from Fig. (l of the drawings.

llaying' thus fully described my invention, I claim as new and desire to secure by la-ts ters latcnt l. scalloped ball cushion made with an exterior wall, consisting ol a series of secmental longitudinally-cilnvexcd and separatel \lilled sectionsarranged about. a common axis, the longitudinal lateral cdgesol' each sec tion being connected to the abutting lateral edges of the adjoining sect ions, substantially as herein set forth.

2. A scalloped ball cushion made with an exterior wall, consisting of a series of segmental longitudinally-ctnn'exedandseparately-tilled sections arranged about a common axis and each having an inner wall or face of reduced or smaller area than its outer wall or face, the longitudinal lateral edges of each section being connected to the abutting latcral edges of the adjoining sect ions,substantially as herein set forth.

3. A scalloped ball cushion made with an exterior wall, consisting of a series of seg mental longitud inally-eonvcxed and separately-filled sections arranged about a common axis. the longitudinal lateral edges of each section being connected to the abutting lat,- eral edges of the adjoining sections, and an interior filling placed in the chamber formed within the connected segmental sections, substantially as herein set forth.

4. A scalloped ball cushion made with an exterior wall, consisting of a series of segmental longitudinally-convexed and separat ely-filled sections arranged about a common axis and each having an inner wall or face of reduced or smaller area than its outer wall or face, the longitudinal lateral edges of each section being connected to the abutting lateral edges of the adjoining sections, and an interior tilling placed in the chamber formed within the connected segmental sections,substal'itially as herein set forth.

5. A scalloped ball cushion made with an exterior wall, consisting of a series of segmental longitudi nally-eonvexed and separately-filled sections arranged about a common axis, the longitudinal lateral edges of each section being connected to the abutting latcral edges of the adjoining sections, and a loi'igitudinal stay drawing the ends of the cushion into rounded forln, substantially as herein set forth.

CHARLES F. BENTLEY.

Witnesses:

J'As. C. CoUcLn, FRANK HOLLAND.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5148564 *Dec 19, 1991Sep 22, 1992Reder Larry MMiniature portable support construction
US5755647 *May 16, 1995May 26, 1998Lawrence I. WechslerExercise appliance for abdominal muscles and method of using same
US8182379Jun 27, 2008May 22, 2012Nike, Inc.Sport balls and methods of manufacturing the sport balls
US8192311Jun 27, 2008Jun 5, 2012Nike, Inc.Sport ball with a textile restriction structure
US8210973Jun 27, 2008Jul 3, 2012Nike, Inc.Sport ball bladder
US8262519May 26, 2011Sep 11, 2012Nike, Inc.Sport ball casing and methods of manufacturing the casing
US8579743Jan 5, 2010Nov 12, 2013Nike, Inc.Sport balls and methods of manufacturing the sport balls
US8597144Jun 28, 2011Dec 3, 2013Nike, Inc.Sport ball casing with thermoplastic reinforcing material
US8597450May 29, 2012Dec 3, 2013Nike, Inc.Method of manufacturing a sport ball
US8608599Mar 20, 2009Dec 17, 2013Nike, Inc.Sport ball casing and methods of manufacturing the casing
US8617011Dec 3, 2010Dec 31, 2013Nike, Inc.Sport ball with indented casing
US8672784May 4, 2011Mar 18, 2014Nike, Inc.Sport ball with an inflation-retention bladder
US8708847Jun 28, 2011Apr 29, 2014Nike, Inc.Sport ball casing and methods of manufacturing the casing
US8771115May 4, 2011Jul 8, 2014Nike, Inc.Sport ball with an inflation-retention bladder
US8777787Apr 19, 2012Jul 15, 2014Nike, Inc.Sport ball
US8852039Mar 30, 2012Oct 7, 2014Nike, Inc.Sport ball casing with integrated bladder material
US8926459Mar 30, 2012Jan 6, 2015Nike, Inc.Sport balls and methods of manufacturing the sport balls
US8974330Mar 30, 2012Mar 10, 2015Nike, Inc.Sport ball casing and methods of manufacturing the casing
US20130191998 *Jan 31, 2013Aug 1, 2013Homtex, Inc.Universal pillow
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA47G9/10