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Publication numberUS4158000 A
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 05/906,565
Publication dateJun 12, 1979
Filing dateMay 16, 1978
Priority dateMay 25, 1977
Also published asCA1104742A1, DE2822722A1, DE2822722C2
Publication number05906565, 906565, US 4158000 A, US 4158000A, US-A-4158000, US4158000 A, US4158000A
InventorsHideo Nagasaki, Takashi Kojima, Yoshinori Shiro
Original AssigneeSumitomo Chemical Company, Limited
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
2,2,4-trimethyldihydroquinoline and its homopolymer
US 4158000 A
Abstract
Antidegradants for rubber comprising a mixture consisting essentially of 2,2,4-trimethyl-1,2-dihydroquinoline monomer, dimer thereof and more highly polymerized products than the said dimer, the contents of the said quinoline monomer and the said quinoline dimer being less than 5% by weight and 25% by weight or more, respectively. The antidegradants for rubber are very useful for preventing both heat ageing and flex cracking of rubber.
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Claims(3)
What is claimed is:
1. A method for preventing heat ageing and flex cracking of rubber at the same time, which comprises incorporating the antidegradant for rubber comprising a mixture consisting essentially of 2,2,4-trimethyl-1,2-dihydroquinoline monomer, dimer thereof and more highly polymerized products than the said dimer, the contents of the said quinoline monomer and the said quinoline dimer being less than 5% by weight and 25% by weight or more, respectively into said rubber.
2. A method according to claim 1, wherein the amount of the antidegradant incorporated is 0.1 to 7 parts by weight based on 100 parts by weight of rubber.
3. A method according to claim 1, wherein the said rubber includes natural rubbers, styrene/butadiene copolymer rubbers, acrylonitrile/butadiene copolymer rubbers, polybutadiene rubbers and polyisoprene rubbers.
Description

The present invention relates to antidegradants for rubber, and more particularly it relates to antidegradants for rubber having excellent effects to prevent natural or synthetic rubbers from flex cracking and heat ageing.

In general, natural or synthetic rubber products have such properties that they produce cracks by repeated flexing and finally they become unsuitable for use owing to the growth of the cracks, or degradation by heat.

Hitherto, various attempts have been made to prevent such flex cracking and heat ageing, and many of them have proposed to use phenyl-β-naphthylamine or diphenylamine derivatives as antidegradants effective against flex cracking and heat ageing of rubber.

With these antidegradants, however, satisfactory performance has not yet been obtained. In recent years, particularly, there have been increasing demands for improvement in the flex cracking resistance and heat ageing resistance of rubber compounds with increasing tendencies towards the production of radial tire and belt for a high-speed belt conveyer. For this reason, there have also been strong demands for development of antidegradants having excellent performance in prevention of flex cracking and heat ageing.

On the other hand, 2,2,4-trimethyl-1,2-dihydroquinoline polymer mixture, which are a so-called dihydroquinoline polymer, produced by reaction between aniline and acetones, are widely used for heat ageing resistance, since they are not only very superior in preventing heat ageing but are also economical and have stable availability. As to the composition of antidegradants now on the market as the so-called dihydroquinoline polymer, the following are known by gas-chromatography (internal standard method); the main component is a mixture of 2,2,4-trimethyl-1,2-dihydroquinoline trimer and more highly polymerized products than the trimer, and in addition thereto, large amounts of impurities having no dihydroquinoline structure are contained. Since, however, the commercial antidegradant, the dihydroquinoline polymer, has little or no effect to prevent flex cracking, it is at present necessary to use another flex cracking inhibitor in combination in order to prevent both flex cracking and heat ageing. Besides, the antidegradant causes various practical problems, for example they are so much poor in compatibility with rubbers that troubles are caused in rubber processing.

In order to overcome these problems, the inventors extensively studied to develop antidegradants having excellent effect to prevent both flex cracking and heat ageing which are now most strongly demanded in the rubber industry.

As a result, it was found that, of various polymers resulting from 2,2,4-trimethyl-1,2-dihydroquinoline, the dimer alone shows a remarkably superior ability to prevent flex cracking, particularly at high temperatures, and improves resistance to heat ageing, and moreover that the dimer has excellent compatibility with rubbers. As a result of further investigation, the inventors found that, to say nothing of the excellent performance of the dimer itself, even mixtures comprising the said dimer, the said dihydroquinoline monomer and more highly polymerized products than the said dimer display excellent ability, as antidegradants for rubber, to prevent both heat ageing and flex cracking, when the dimer content of the mixtures is 25% by weight or more.

The present invention provides an antidegradant for rubber comprising a mixture consisting essentially of 2,2,4-trimethyl-1,2-dihydroquinoline monomer (referred to as "quinoline monomer" hereinafter), dimer thereof (referred to as "quinoline dimer" hereinafter) and more highly polymerized products than the said dimer (referred to as "quinoline polymer" hereinafter), the contents of the said quinoline monomer and the said quinoline dimer being less than 5% by weight and 25% by weight or more, respectively, and also provides a method for preventing heat ageing and flex cracking of rubber at the same time by incorporating said antidegradant into rubber.

The method for production of the antidegradant of the present invention is not particularly limited. For example, they may be produced by reacting aniline and acetones (e.g. acetone, diacetone alcohol, mesityl oxide) in the presence of an acidic catalyst by usual methods [for example, D. Craig; J.A.C.S., 60, 1458 (1938)], under reaction conditions such as catalyst amount and reaction temperature adjusted so as to produce the said mixture containing at least 25% by weight of the quinoline dimer. Alternatively, they may be produced by properly mixing the quinoline dimer, the quinoline monomer and the quinoline polymer which are separately produced by usual methods in advance.

In the antidegradants of the present invention, the content of the quinoline dimer is at least 25% by weight, preferably at least 35% by weight, more preferably at least 50% by weight. Further, the quinoline dimer produced by removing the quinoline monomer and quinoline polymer from the reaction product described above is of course included in the present invention.

The antidegradants of the present invention are incorporated not only in natural rubbers but also in synthetic rubbers such as styrene/butadiene copolymer rubbers, acrylonitrile/butadiene copolymer rubbers, polybutadiene rubbers and polyisoprene rubbers by usual methods, for example using mixers such as mixing rolls and Banbury mixers. The amount of antidegradant incorporated is generally 0.1 to 7 parts by weight, preferably 0.2 to 4 parts by weight, based on 100 parts by weight of rubber.

In using the antidegradants for rubber of the present invention, other additives and antidegradants such as N-phenyl-N'-alkyl-p-phenylenediamines and N,N'-diaryl-p-phenylenediamines may be added.

As described above, the antidegradants for rubber of the present invention are superior not only in ability to prevent flex cracking but also in ability to prevent degradation by heat or oxidation. Particularly, they display very superior advantages by themselves, in usages requiring flex resistance and heat resistance at the same time, while two or more different kinds of antidegradants each having effects to prevent either flex cracking or heat ageing are conventionally used together for such usages. Further, the antidegradants of the present invention are so superior in compatibility with rubbers that they are very practical and suitable for multipurpose as antidegradants for rubber.

The present invention will be illustrated in detail with reference to the following examples, which are not however to be interpreted as limiting the present invention thereto. Parts are by weight.

EXAMPLE 1

A rubber compound comprising 100 parts of natural rubber, 45 parts of HAF carbon, 5 parts of zinc oxide, 2.5 parts of sulfur, 1 part of stearic acid, 5 parts of a process oil, 0.5 part of N-cyclohexylbenzothiazylsulfene amide (vulcanization accelerator) and 1 part of an antidegradant shown in Table 1 was milled as usual on a 6 inches φ mixing roll. The rubber sheet thus prepared was tested for tackiness. The same rubber compound was vulcanized at 140 C. for 30 minutes and the vulcanized rubber product was subjected to a heat ageing test and a flex cracking test.

Tackiness between rubbers was measured on a Tel-Tak meter (produced by Monsant Co.) using the test pieces which had been prepared by cutting the above mentioned rubber sheet in 5 mm. in width and ageing at 25 C. for 10 days. The heat ageing test was carried out according to JIS K 6301, i.e. by heat-ageing the test pieces at 100 C. for 24 hours in a test tube heat ageing tester, and then measuring physical properties of the resulting test pieces.

The flex cracking test was carried out as follows according to JIS K 6301: A hole of 2 mm. in length is vertically made through the test piece, and, after the required number of times of flexing, the length of crack is measured.

The same test was also applied to the test pieces which had been heat-aged at 100 C. for 24 hours in a Geer oven.

The results obtained are shown in Table 2. It is apparent from the table that the antidegradants of the present invention have a high tackiness and good compatibility with rubbers and further that they are very superior in heat ageing resistance and flex cracking resistance.

              Table 1______________________________________      Composition (weight %)*Experiment   Quinoline Quinoline Other reactionNo.          dimer     monomer   products______________________________________    1       96        1       3    2       76        2       22Present  3       52        4       44example  4       42        2       56    5       36        3       61    6       28        4       68    7       18        1       81Compara- 8       13        2       85tiveexample  9       Phenyl-β-naphthylamine    10      Condensation product of diphenylamine            and acetone______________________________________ *The composition was measured under the following conditions according to the internal standard method of gas-chromatography: Apparatus : GC-163 (produced by Hitachi Seisakusho Co.) Column : Silicone OV-1 (Chromosorb W, AW, DMCS) 3mm φ  1m Temperature : Constant temperature vessel 110-300 C. (10 C./min.) Inlet 300 C. Detector 300 C. Detector : FID Carrier gas : N2 (0.6 kg./cm2) Internal standard substance : Di-n-butyl phthalate

In this case, the retention time ratio of the quinoline dimer to di-n-butyl phthalate was 1.9 to 2.1 and that of the quinoline monomer to di-n-butyl phthalate was 0.2 to 0.3. The structures of the quinoline dimer and quinoline monomer were identified using a mass analysis apparatus and nuclear magnetic resonance absorption apparatus.

                                  Table 2__________________________________________________________________________                                 Comparative               Present example No.                                 example No.Characteristics      1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10__________________________________________________________________________Tackiness  After 1 day  70<                  70<                     70<                        70<                           70<                              70<                                 70<                                    70<                                       70<                                          70<(ounce/  After 3 days  "  "  "  "  "  " 45 41  "  "5  5 mm2)  After 10 days                "  "  "  " 64 58 22 17  "  "  (Before heat ageing)Heat   Tensile strength (kg/cm2)               265                  268                     265                        265                           264                              263                                 264                                    263                                       260                                          261ageing Elongation (%)               540                  540                     540                        540                           540                              540                                 530                                    540                                       530                                          530test   (After heat ageing)  Tensile strength (kg/cm2)               199                  197                     198                        196                           194                              194                                 193                                    193                                       172                                          187  Elongation (%)               430                  420                     420                        420                           410                              410                                 400                                    400                                       380                                          390  (Before heat ageing)  Length of crack after  5000 bendings (mm)               3.8                  4.1                     4.1                        4.2                           4.3                              4.3                                 5.2                                    6.1                                       4.4                                          4.3Flex   Length of crack aftercracking  10000 bendings (mm)               4.4                  4.7                     4.8                        4.8                           4.9                              5.0                                 6.3                                    7.1                                       5.1                                          5.3test   (After heat ageing)  Length of crack after  5000 bendings (mm)               4.3                  4.7                     4.7                        4.8                           4.9                              5.0                                 7.0                                    7.5                                       5.0                                          5.4  Length of crack after               5.2                  6.0                     6.1                        6.2                           6.2                              6.3                                 9.3                                    9.8                                       6.4                                          7.0  10000 bendings (mm)__________________________________________________________________________
EXAMPLE 2

A rubber compound comprising 100 parts of styrene/butadiene rubber, 50 parts of HAF carbon, 5 parts of a process oil, 5 parts of zinc oxide, 3 parts of stearic acid, 2.5 parts of sulfur, 1 part of N-cyclohexylbenzothiazylsulfene amide (vulcanization accelerator) and 1 part of an antidegradant shown in Table 1 was milled as usual on a 6 inches φ mixing roll and vulcanized at 145 C. for 30 minutes. Using the test pieces thus obtained, a flex cracking test was carried out in the same manner as in Example 1. The results obtained are shown in Table 3.

                                  Table 3__________________________________________________________________________                          Comparative        Present example   exampleExperiment No.        1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10__________________________________________________________________________(Before heat ageing)Length of crack after 3000bendings (mm)        4.8           5.0              5.1                 5.2                    5.2                       5.3                          5.7                             6.8                                5.3                                   5.3Length of crack after 5000bendings (mm)        8.0           8.3              8.4                 8.5                    8.6                       8.6                          9.9                             10.2                                9.0                                   9.0(After heat ageing)Length of crack after 3000bendings (mm)        7.7           8.2              8.3                 8.4                    8.5                       8.5                          9.3                             10.0                                8.6                                   8.7Length of crack after 5000bendings (mm)        12.6           13.2              13.413.5         13.5           13.6              14.4                 15.3                    13.8                       14.0__________________________________________________________________________
Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2064752 *Mar 12, 1934Dec 15, 1936Monsanto ChemicalsPreservation of rubber
US2095126 *Aug 11, 1936Oct 5, 1937Goodrich Co B FMethod of making 2,4-dialkylquinolines and of decomposing amineketone reaction products
US2100998 *Mar 9, 1935Nov 30, 1937Monsanto ChemicalsPreservation of rubber
US2290561 *Aug 23, 1939Jul 21, 1942Monsanto ChemicalsProcess of vulcanizing rubber
US3083181 *Oct 3, 1960Mar 26, 1963Monsanto ChemicalsAminoaryl tetrahydroquinolines
US3244683 *Jan 17, 1963Apr 5, 1966Goodyear Tire & RubberPolymerization of 2, 2, 4-trimethyl-1, 2-dihydroquinoline
US3554959 *Jun 1, 1967Jan 12, 1971Monsanto ChemicalsRubber antioxidants
US3620824 *Jun 3, 1968Nov 16, 1971Monsanto CoWhite thermally stable polyether modified polyester fibers and method of production
US3842034 *Mar 12, 1973Oct 15, 1974Bridgestone Tire Co LtdRubber compositions
Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *Craig, J.A.C.S., vol, 60, No. 6, 1938, pp. 1458 and 1459.
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4326062 *Jul 22, 1980Apr 20, 1982Sumitomo Chemical Company, Ltd.Manufacture of polymerized 2,2,4-trimethyl-1,2-dihydroquinoline
US4624977 *May 23, 1985Nov 25, 1986Bridgestone CorporationNatural or synthetic rubber denatured nitrosoquinoline, carbon black
US4941968 *Jul 28, 1989Jul 17, 1990Betz Laboratories, Inc.Alkyl-1,2-hihydroquinoline compounds to inhibit gum formation
US4981495 *Jul 13, 1989Jan 1, 1991Betz Laboratories, Inc.Oxidation resistance, (poly)-1,2-dihydroquinoline
US5665799 *Sep 7, 1995Sep 9, 1997Sumitomo Chemical Company, LimitedRubber composition and a vulcanizing adhesion method using the same
US5684073 *May 1, 1995Nov 4, 1997The Yokohama Rubber Co., Ltd.Pneumatic tire having improved abrasion resistance
US6171517Feb 3, 1994Jan 9, 2001Uniroyal Chemical Company, Inc.Rubber compounding formulation and method
US6310144Jun 2, 1995Oct 30, 2001Sumitomo Chemical Company, LimitedBlending rubbers with diene rubber with 0.5 to 5 parts by weight of a 2,2,4-trimethyl-1,2-dihydroquinoline polymer having a primary amine
US6533859 *May 21, 2001Mar 18, 2003Flexsys America L.P.Surface treated carbon black having improved dispersability in rubber and compositions of rubber therefrom having improved processability, rheological and dynamic mechanical properties
US6726855Dec 2, 1998Apr 27, 2004Uniroyal Chemical Company, Inc.Lubricant compositions comprising multiple antioxidants
DE3028322A1 *Jul 25, 1980Feb 19, 1981Sumitomo Chemical CoVerfahren zur herstellung von polymerisiertem 2,2,4-trimethyl-1,2-dihydrochinolin
EP0147378A1 *Nov 30, 1984Jul 3, 1985Monsanto CompanyLiquid hydroquinoline-type antioxydants
Classifications
U.S. Classification524/87, 546/181, 546/165, 546/167, 526/259, 546/166, 524/925
International ClassificationC08K5/3437, C08L7/00, C08K5/34, C08L79/04, C08L21/00, C08G12/00, C08L79/00
Cooperative ClassificationY10S524/925, C08K5/3437
European ClassificationC08K5/3437