Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS4233626 A
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 06/002,725
Publication dateNov 11, 1980
Filing dateJan 11, 1979
Priority dateJan 11, 1979
Publication number002725, 06002725, US 4233626 A, US 4233626A, US-A-4233626, US4233626 A, US4233626A
InventorsAlan E. Bell
Original AssigneeRca Corporation
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Playback information record using phase cancellation for reading
US 4233626 A
Abstract
A flat major surface of a disc-shaped substrate (e.g., of glass) is coated with a first light reflective layer (e.g., Rhodium) which is coated with a layer of a dielectric material (e.g., silicon dioxide) highly transparent of light of a frequency supplied by a playback laser, which transparent layer is coated with a second light reflective layer (e.g., Rhodium). The light output of a recording laser, which is intensity modulated in accordance with a signal to be recorded, is focused upon the coated surface of the disc as the disc is rotated. With the peak intensity of the focused light sufficient to at least cause melting of the second reflective layer, an information track is formed as a succession of spaced pits in which the first reflective layer is effectively exposed through the layer of dielectric material. For playback, light of a constant intensity is focused on the information track and the adjacent land areas as the disc is rotated. The focused light is of insufficient intensity to effect melting of the remaining portions of the second reflective layer, but is of a frequency at which the thickness of the dielectric layer exposed through the pits introduces a phase change of approximately (2K+1) π radians between reflected portions of the focused light which fall on the pits and reflected portions of the focused light which fall on the undisturbed areas of the disc, where k is zero or any integer. A photodetector, positioned to receive light reflected from the information track as the pits pass through the path of the focused light, develops a signal representative of the recorded information.
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(6)
What is claimed is:
1. An information record, for use in playback apparatus employing a playback beam of light of a given frequency; said record comprising:
a substrate having a light reflective surface;
a layer of light transparent material overlying said reflective surface; and
a layer of light reflective material, having an information track formed therein, overlying said light transparent layer;
wherein said information track comprises a succession of spaced pits and intervening land areas with variations in the spacing between successive pit edges representative of recorded information; and
wherein the thickness of said layer of light transparent material in those layer regions occupied by said pits is such as to introduce a phase change of approximately (2K+1) π radians between portions of said beam which respectively fall on said pits and said intervening land areas at said given frequency, where k is zero or any integer.
2. An information record in accordance with claim 1 wherein said substrate is in the form of a disc and wherein said light reflective surface comprises a metal layer deposited on a major surface of said disc.
3. An information record in accordance with claim 2 wherein said light transparent layer comprises a dielectric material; and wherein said light reflective layer is formed by a metal coating.
4. An information record in accordance with claim 3 wherein the reflectance of said light reflective surface is greater than the reflectance of said light reflective light at said given frequency.
5. An information record in accordance with claim 3 wherein said light reflective surface comprises aluminum, and wherein said light reflective layer comprises rhodium.
6. An information record, for use in playback apparatus employing a playback beam of light of a given frequency, said record comprising:
a substrate having a light reflective surface;
a layer of light transparent material overlying said reflective surface; and
a substantially opaque layer of light reflective material, overlying said dielectric material with an information track formed in said opaque layer;
wherein said information track comprises a succession of spaced pits, with variations in the spacing between successive pit edges representative of recorded information;
wherein the thickness of said light reflective layer in those layer regions occupied by said pits is less than the thickness required to render said light reflective layer opaque; and
wherein the thickness of said light transparent layer is chosen to establish a phase-cancellation condition between reflected portions of light at said given frequency; falling respectively on said pits and undistributed regions of said light reflective layer surrounding said pits.
Description

This is a division of application Ser. No. 782,035, filed Mar. 28, 1977, now abandoned.

The present invention relates to a novel high-density information record structure suitable for use with optical recording and playback apparatus and methods.

It has been proposed in the prior art (e.g., "Phillips' Technical Review" 33, No. 7, pgs. 178-180) to effect video information storage in a "phase structure" record (i.e., a record structure which modifies the phase of an incident beam of radiation). Such a phase structure record, usually in the shape of a disc, comprises a plurality of pits which have been pressed into the surface of the disc and successively arranged along a spiral track in an information coded pattern. The distance between the plane of the land areas adjacent to the pits and that of the pit bottoms is chosen such that incident radiation from a playback beam which is reflected at a pit bottom traverses an optical path length which is approximately (2n+1) λ/2 (where λ is the wavelength of the beam and n is an integer) shorter or longer than the optical path length covered by incident radiation which is reflected from the land areas. Through such a choice of distance, the phase structure exhibits high reflectivity when a read beam, which is focused on the spiral track and the adjacent land areas, falls on an area intermediate of the pits, while exhibiting low reflectivity when the read beam falls on both a pit and the surrounding land area (due to destructive interference "phase cancellation" between the radiation respectively reflected from the bottom of the pit and the adjacent land area). In this way, as the disc record is rotated, the intensity of the radiation reflected from the track is modulated by the coded pattern of pits and the recorded information may, therefore, be recovered from the reflected radiation through appropriate means (e.g., photo detector and related decoding circuitry).

In accordance with the principles of the present invention, the aforesaid phase structure record is advantageously realized by a recording medium which allows for direct "real time" information recording thereon and which further allows for immediate playback of the recorded information without the need for any intermediate processing or developing steps.

In further accordance with the principles of the present invention, an illustrative recording medium is advantageously realized in the form of a substrate having a surface which is reflective (at least at the frequency of a light forming a playback beam), with a layer of material, transparent at the playback beam light frequency, overlying the reflective surface, and a second layer of material, reflective at the playback beam light frequency, overlying the transparent layer. With the thickness of the dielectric layer being chosen, with respect to the frequency of the playback radiation beam, to provide, in the plane of the surface of the record, a one-half wavelength phase difference between light reflected from the substrate surface ("bottom" reflective layer) and light reflected from the second "top" reflective layer, the ability to accurately effect phase cancellation is enhanced.

In accordance with one aspect of the present invention, the top reflective layer is desirably chosen of a material having high absorption at the frequency of a light forming a recording beam so as to reduce the thickness of the top reflective layer while allowing for the absorption of a maximum fraction of the recording light incident thereon. The heat absorbed in the top reflective layer from the recording beam is effective in melting portions of the top reflective layer leading to the formation of a pit. Rapid heat diffusion in the dielectric layer and the bottom reflective layer assures that these layers will remain unaffected by the recording beam.

Pursuant to another aspect of the present invention, the aforesaid tri-layer construction of the recording medium advantageously provides for a lessened sensitivity of the record medium to fluctuations in the high intensity level of the recording beam. This results from the fact that the phase cancellation effect is a product of the thickness of the transparent layer and the reflectivity of the bottom reflective layer, both of which are independent of the recording process.

In accordance with yet another aspect of the present invention, the tri-layer construction of the recording medium allows for the use of different reflective material respectively for the top and bottom reflective layers. Compensation for the reduced reflectivity of the bottom reflective layer, due to the presence of the dielectric layer, may therefore be easily achieved by forming the bottom reflective layer of a material having higher reflectivity than the reflectivity of the material chosen for the top reflective layer. The difference in reflectivity is desirably made to correspond to the reduced reflectivity of the bottom reflective layer to thereby enhance the phase cancellation effect.

In accordance with a first illustrative embodiment of the present invention, a surface of a glass substrate of disc form is processed so as to form a polished flat surface, which is then coated with a first layer of reflective material (e.g., Rhodium). A layer of material (e.g., a dielectric material, such as silicon dioxide) which is transparent at the light frequency of a monochromatic light source available for recording use (e.g., an argon laser, providing an output at a wavelength of 4880 angstrom units) is deposited over the reflective layer. Finally, a second opaque layer of a material reflective at the light frequency of the recording light source (e.g., Rhodium) is coated over the transparent layer.

In accordance with a second illustrative embodiment of the present invention, an information record formed in accordance with the principles of the present invention is provided with a first reflective layer which is formed of a material (e.g., Aluminum) having a higher reflectivity than the material utilized in forming the top reflective layer (e.g., Rhodium). The information record of the second illustrative embodiment conforming in all other respects to the first illustrative embodiment of the invention.

In an illustrative recording system (e.g., of a type described in copending U.S. Application Ser. No. 668,495 to F. W. Spong) a record blank of the above-described disc form embodying the principles of the present invention is subjected to rotation at a constant rotational speed while a beam of light from a light source (e.g., a laser, providing light at a frequency at which the top reflective layer is absorptive) is focused on the coated surface of the disc. The intensity of the light beam is controlled in accordance with information to be recorded. Illustratively, the control is effected in accordance with carrier waves modulated in frequency by picture-representative video signals, with the light beam intensity varying as a result between a high level sufficient to effect melting of the absorptive material and a low level insufficient to effect such malting, the frequency of the level alternations varying as the video signal amplitude changes. An information track comprising a succession of spaced pits is thus formed in the coated surface of the disc, the pits appearing in those surface regions exposed to the high level beam, due to melting of the top reflective layer material in response to the high level beam exposure with variations in the length and separation of the pits being representative of the recorded information. Where a continuous sequence of pictures is to be recorded, a spiral information track may be formed by providing relative motion, in a radial direction and at a constant rate during the recording between the recording beam and the rotating disc. Alternatively, in the absence of such relative motion during the recording, a circular information track may be formed, appropriate for "slide" recording purposes.

The result of the above-described recording process is the formation of an information record of a form which facilitates recovery of the recorded information by optical playback processes. The information track of such an information record will comprise (1) undisturbed surface regions alternating with (2) pits formed by the melting process that introduce at an appropriate light beam frequency, a phase change of approximately (2K+1)π radians between portions of the light beam which respectively fall on the pits and the undisturbed regions, where k is zero or any integer. With such a record structure, a high readout contrast ratio between the reflectance of a region comprising approximately equal pit and surrounding land areas and the reflectance of the intervening (undisturbed surface) regions is readily obtained.

The playback beam has a constant intensity at a level insufficient to effect melting of the disc coatings, and is of a frequency substantially corresponding to that at which the dielectric material layer is transparent. A photodetector, positioned to receive light reflected from the successive regions of the information track as they pass through the path of the focused light, develops a signal representative of the recorded information.

In the accompanying drawings:

FIG. 1 provides a cross-sectional view of a portion of a recording medium, exhibiting a construction in accordance with principles of the present invention;

FIG. 2 illustrates a cross-sectional view of a portion of the information track of an information record formed from a recording medium of the type shown in FIG. 1 pursuant to principles of the present invention;

FIG. 3 provides a graph of the relationship between dielectric layer thickness and reflectance for the various reflective layers of an illustrative form of the recording medium of FIGS. 1 and 2; and

FIG. 4 provides a graph of the relationship between dielectric layer thickness and the phase angle of the playback light beam reflected from the various reflective layers of an illustrative form of the recording medium of FIGS. 1 and 2.

In FIG. 1, a cross-sectional view of a portion of a record blank 11, formed for use in an optical recording system, shows the construction of a recording medium pursuant to an illustrative embodiment of the present invention. The record blank 11 includes a substrate 13, which is illustratively formed in the shape of a disc, a major surface (s) of which is processed to be polished and flat. Desirably, the substrate 13 is formed of a material, such as glass, for example, which may be conveniently processed to achieve such surface.

Overlying the surface "s" of the substrate 13 is a thin layer 15 of a material exhibiting reflectivity (over at least a given portion of the light spectrum). Illustratively, the reflecting layer 15 is formed of a 1,000 A thick layer of a metal, such as Rhodium, for example, deposited on the surface "s" by an evaporation process.

Overlying the reflective layer 15 is a layer 17 of material which is light transparent (at least over the aforementioned given portion of the light spectrum). Illustratively, the absorptive layer 17 is formed of a dielectric material, such as silicon dioxide, for example, deposited on the reflecting layer 15 by an evaporation process.

Finally, overlying the transparent layer 17 is an opaque layer 19 of a reflective material which is also light absorptive at least over the aforementioned given portion of the light spectrum. Illustratively, the top reflective layer 19 is formed of a 300 A thick layer of rhodium, deposited on the transparent layer 17 by an evaporation process.

In the illustrated construction of the recording medium, information recording is effected when a light beam L (of a frequency in the aforementioned given portion of the spectrum) is directed along an axis (x) normal to the surface "s", and focused at or near the surface of the top reflective layer 19. When the intensity of the focused light beam L is of sufficient magnitude, material of the top reflective layer 19 is elevated to a melting temperature, and melting of the material occurs, forming a pit in the surface of the record blank 11. With suitable modulation of the intensity of the beam L in accordance with a recording signal, as successive regions of the record blank 11 pass through the beam path, an information track may be formed comprising spaced pits in regions of the top reflective layer subject to the high intensity beam exposure, separated by undisturbed regions of the top reflective layer (that were not subject to such high intensity beam exposure).

FIG. 2 illustrates a portion of an information record formed when the record blank 11 of FIG. 1 is subjected to such controlled beam exposure. As shown in cross-section in FIG. 2, the information track comprises a succession of spaced pits p1, p2, p3, p4, separated by regions (u1, u2, u3, u4) in which the surfaces of the top reflective layer 19 is undisturbed. For illustrative purposes, the depth of each pit is shown as being equal to the thickness of the top reflective layer 19, whereby the bottom reflective layer 15 is wholly uncovered through the transparent layer 17 in the pit regions. As will be discussed subsequently, while such a depth of melting may desirably result in maximization of the readout contrast ratio, it is not essential for good playback results. Thus, in an acceptable alternative to the illustrated form of information record, a residual portion of the absorptive material (with a thickness, of course, less than the original layer thickness) may overlie the transparent layer 17 in the pit bottoms.

When the light frequency of a playback beam provided by a laser falls in the given spectrum portion for which the top and bottom layers 15 and 19 are reflective and at or close to the frequency at which the pit regions of the system 19-17-15-13 exhibit the phase cancellation effect, a high readout contrast ratio is realized, permitting video signal recovery with a high signal-to-noise ratio.

FIG. 3 illustrates the relationship between the dielectric layer thickness and reflectance, at the surface of the recording medium of FIG. 1, computed for the various reflective layers of an illustrative form of the recording medium. Curve a of the graph represents the reflectance of a top layer 19 of the record medium of FIG. 1 which is formed of a 300 A thick layer of rhodium. Curves b and c represent the reflectance, through a 300 A thick air layer and the dielectric layer, of bottom layers 15 formed respectively of rhodium (1,000 A thick), and aluminum (200 A thick).

With reference now to FIG. 4, there is illustrated the relationship between the dielectric layer thickness and the phase angle, at the surface of the recording medium of FIG. 1, computed for a playback beam (of 4,880 A wavelength) reflected from the various reflective layers of the recording medium. Curve a represents the phase angle of light reflected off the top reflective layer 19 of the recording medium of FIG. 1. Since the top layer 19 overlies the dielectric layer 17, the phase angle of the light reflected therefrom will be unaffected by variations in the thickness of the dielectric layer. Curves b' and c' on the other hand, are respectively representative of the phase angle of light reflected off the rhodium and aluminum bottom reflective layers and passing through the dielectric layer and a 300 A thick air layer.

It will be noted from FIG. 4 that a phase angle difference of 180 between curves a' and b' occurs at a dielectric layer thickness of 570 A. Similarly, the dielectric layer thickness for a phase angle difference of 180 between curves a' and c' may be found to be 615 A.

When a recording medium, in accordance with the present invention, is formed with a rhodium-silicon dioxide rhodium structure following the aforementioned parameters (i.e., top layer thickness 300 A, dielectric layer thickness 570 A, bottom layer thickness 1,000 A and playback light wavelength of 4880 A), the reflectance R for the surface area covered by a light beam, of the aforementioned appropriate frequency, which falls on approximately equal pit and surrounding land areas, may be calculated using the following equation: ##EQU1## where R1 is the reflectance of the undisturbed surface regions and R2 is the reflectance of the bottom layer. Therefore for R1 =0.74 and R2 =0.61 (from FIG. 3) R will equal 0.01 and the contrast ratio for a recorded disc blank of the rhodium-silicon dioxide-rhodium structure will approximate 74:1.

Better results are achievable with a rhodium-silicon dioxide-aluminum structure following the aforementioned parameters (i.e., top layer thickness 300 A, dielectric layer thickness 615 A, bottom layer thickness 200 A and playback light wavelength of 4880 A). Utilizing the aforementioned equation with R1 =0.74 and R2 =0.725 (from FIG. 3), the reflectance R may be calculated to equal to 810-5, which reflectance is smaller by a factor of 100 than the reflectance obtained above by utilizing a rhodium bottom layer.

While the principles of the present invention have been demonstrated with particular regard to the illustrative structures of FIGS. 1 and 2, it will be recognized that various departures from such illustrative structures may be undertaken in practice of the invention. For example, the substrate itself may be formed of material having high reflectivity, eliminating the need for employing a separate reflecting layer in forming a reflective surface underlying the absorptive layer. For another example, since wideband reflection is not required of the reflecting layer, the metal coating may be supplanted by a multilayer (or even a single layer) dielectric reflector. It should also be appreciated that other forms of optical recording (such as pulsed holographic recording) may use the advantageous record blank structure described herein.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3474457 *Nov 13, 1967Oct 21, 1969Precision Instr CoLaser recording apparatus
US3665483 *Jun 6, 1969May 23, 1972Chase Manhattan Capital CorpLaser recording medium
US3747117 *Mar 31, 1971Jul 17, 1973Teletype CorpLaser writing
US3838401 *Jun 21, 1971Sep 24, 1974Siemens AgStorage medium,method for recording information thereon,and apparatus for retrieving the information therefrom
US3983317 *Dec 9, 1974Sep 28, 1976Teletype CorporationAstigmatizer for laser recording and reproducing system
US4023185 *Mar 19, 1976May 10, 1977Rca CorporationAblative optical recording medium
US4041530 *Sep 30, 1975Aug 9, 1977U.S. Philips CorporationVideo disc with phase structure
US4069487 *Dec 22, 1975Jan 17, 1978Canon Kabushiki KaishaRecording member and process for recording
US4097895 *Mar 19, 1976Jun 27, 1978Rca CorporationMultilayer optical record
US4130898 *Aug 29, 1977Dec 19, 1978Xerox CorporationMotion blur compensation for moving media optical data recording system
Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *Bouwhuis, et al. "The Optical Scanning System of the Philips `VLP` Record Player, Philips Tech. Rev." 33, No. 7, 1973 pp. 186-189.
2 *Broadbent, "A Review of the MCA Discl-Vision System" presented 4/26/74 at the 115th SMPTE Tech. Conference at Los Angeles Calif.
3 *Greenblott "High-Density Information Recording by Vaporization of Film Areas" IBM Tech. Disc. Bulletin, vol. 14, No. 8 1/72, p. 2358.
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4330883 *Sep 18, 1979May 18, 1982Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd.System and method of optical information storage in a recording disc
US4345261 *Feb 21, 1979Aug 17, 1982Discovision AssociatesDielectric recording medium
US4385372 *May 1, 1981May 24, 1983Drexler Technology CorporationReflective optical data storage and laser recording media having grooved dielectric encoded prerecorded information
US4405706 *Jun 14, 1982Sep 20, 1983Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd.Optical information recording medium
US4410877 *Aug 18, 1980Oct 18, 1983U.S. Philips CorporationMethod of coding data bits on a recording medium, arrangement for putting the method into effect and recording medium having an information structure
US4578684 *Feb 28, 1985Mar 25, 1986Eastman Kodak CompanyCeramic coating
US5471648 *Nov 1, 1993Nov 28, 1995Societe Anonyme Dite Alcatel RadiotelephoneEquipment for two-way communication
US6149988 *Dec 10, 1998Nov 21, 2000Semiconductor Energy Laboratory Co., Ltd.Method and system of laser processing
US6261856Dec 10, 1998Jul 17, 2001Semiconductor Energy Laboratory Co., Ltd.Method and system of laser processing
EP0077623A1 *Oct 8, 1982Apr 27, 1983Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd.Optical recording and retrieving disc
EP0751006A1Jun 27, 1995Jan 2, 1997AGFA-GEVAERT naamloze vennootschapNew method for the formation of a heat mode image
EP0758103A1Aug 8, 1995Feb 12, 1997AGFA-GEVAERT naamloze vennootschapNew type of photo-sensitive element and a process of forming a metal image with it
EP0762214A1Sep 5, 1995Mar 12, 1997AGFA-GEVAERT naamloze vennootschapPhotosensitive element comprising an image forming layer and a photopolymerisable layer
EP0846571A1Dec 4, 1996Jun 10, 1998AGFA-GEVAERT naamloze vennootschapMethod for the formation of an improved heat mode image
EP0938409A1 *Jan 15, 1997Sep 1, 1999Flex Products, Inc.Laser imageable tuned optical cavity thin film and printing plate incorporating the same
Classifications
U.S. Classification369/275.4, G9B/7.14, G9B/7.039, 346/135.1, 369/275.1, 369/109.01
International ClassificationG11B7/013, G11B7/241
Cooperative ClassificationG11B7/24085, G11B2007/24306, G11B7/258, G11B7/241, G11B2007/2571, G11B2007/25715, G11B7/2585, G11B7/2531
European ClassificationG11B7/24085, G11B7/241
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Aug 12, 1999ASAssignment
Owner name: L-3 COMMUNICATIONS CORPORATION, NEW YORK
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:LOCKHEED MARTIN CORPORATION, A CORP. OF MD;REEL/FRAME:010180/0073
Effective date: 19970430
Jul 14, 1997ASAssignment
Owner name: LOCKHEED MARTIN CORPORATION, MARYLAND
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:MARTIN MARIETTA CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:008628/0518
Effective date: 19960128
Jul 13, 1994ASAssignment
Owner name: MARTIN MARIETTA CORPORATION, MARYLAND
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY;REEL/FRAME:007046/0736
Effective date: 19940322