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Publication numberUS4272675 A
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 06/043,971
Publication dateJun 9, 1981
Filing dateMay 30, 1979
Priority dateMay 30, 1979
Also published asDE3068586D1, EP0029455A1, EP0029455A4, EP0029455B1, WO1980002758A1
Publication number043971, 06043971, US 4272675 A, US 4272675A, US-A-4272675, US4272675 A, US4272675A
InventorsDenis M. Blanford, Syed Naseem
Original AssigneeNcr Corporation
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Symbol processing system
US 4272675 A
Abstract
A symbol processing system incorporated in an NMOS/LSI chip separates valid data from invalid data all generated by scanning a bar-coded symbol. The signals representing the bars and spaces of the symbol are decoded by a pattern recognition array, and the decoded data is clocked into a storage unit. When valid data is discovered, such data is captured within the storage unit. The valid data is then clocked out of the storage unit to a utilization device for further processing.
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Claims(19)
What is claimed is:
1. A system for processing a continuous string of data generated by a pattern recognition array during scanning of a bar-coded symbol, where said string of data contains valid data intermingled with invalid data, comprising:
means receiving said data from said pattern recognition array;
means coupled to said receiving means for storing said data from said pattern recognition array;
timing means for clocking said data from said receiving means to said storage means;
and logic means, coupled to said timing means and said storage means, for distinguishing valid data from invalid data and causing the valid data to be captured in said storage means while the invalid data is clocked out of said storage means by said timing means.
2. The system of claim 1, wherein said receiving means includes means for generating a plurality of first control signals which are used by said timing means for clocking said data into said storage means.
3. The system of claim 2, wherein said receiving means further includes means for generating a plurality of second control signals which are used by said logic means in distinguishing said valid and invalid data and causing the capture of said valid data in said storage means.
4. The system of claim 1, which further includes means for processing said valid data which has been captured in said storage means.
5. The system of claim 4, which further includes means for indicating to said processing means that said valid data has been captured in said storage means.
6. the system of claim 5, which further includes means coupled to said processing means and storage means for generating a command signal for transferring said valid data from said storage means to said processing means.
7. The system of claim 6, wherein said storage means comprises a plurality of shift registers coupled in parallel to said receiving means.
8. The system of claim 7, wherein said plurality of shift registers are coupled in parallel to said processing means.
9. The system of claim 8, wherein said timing means comprises a plurality of counters coupled in parallel to said receiving means.
10. A system for processing a continuous string of data generated by a pattern recognition array during the scanning of a bar-coded symbol, said string of data including parity data, where said data contains valid data intermingled with invalid data, comprising:
means for receiving said data from said pattern recognition array;
first means, coupled to said receiving means, for storing said data from said pattern recognition array;
timing means for clocking said data from said receiving means to said first storage means;
logic means, coupled to said receiving means and said first storage means, for distinguishing said valid data and invalid data and causing said valid data to be captured in said first storage means while said invalid data is clocked out of said first storage means by said timing means;
second storage means, coupled to said first storage means, for storing valid parity data;
and means for generating a first command signal for transferring said valid parity data from said first storage to said second storage means.
11. the system of claim 10, wherein said receiving means includes means for generating a plurality of first control signals which are used by said timing means for clocking said data into said first storage means.
12. The system of claim 11, wherein said receiving means further includes means for generating a plurality of second control signals which are used by said logic means in distinguishing said valid and invalid data and causing the capture of said valid data in said first storage means.
13. The system of claim 10, which further includes means for processing said valid data which has been captured in said first storage means.
14. The system of claim 13, which further includes means for indicating to said processing means that said valid data has been captured in said first storage means.
15. The system of claim 14, wherein said first storage means comprises a plurality of shift registers coupled in parallel to said receiving means.
16. The system of claim 15, wherein said timing means comprises a plurality of counters coupled in parallel to said receiving means.
17. The system of claim 16, wherein said second storage means comprises a read-only memory device.
18. A system for processing a continuous string of data received from a pattern recognition array and generated by scanning a bar-coded multi-symbol, where said string of data contains valid data intermingled with invalid data, comprising:
means for receiving said data from said pattern recognition array;
means coupled to said receiving means for storing said data from said pattern recognition array;
timing means, coupled to said receiving means and said storage means, for clocking said data from said receiving means to said storage means;
and logic means, coupled to said timing means and said storage means, for distinguishing valid data from invalid data and causing the valid data to be captured in said storage means while the invalid data is clocked out of said storage means by said timing means.
19. A method for processing a continuous string of data received from a pattern recognition array and generated by scanning a bar-coded symbol, where said string of data contains valid data intermingled with invalid data, comprising the steps of:
clocking the data into a plurality of storage means;
generating a first signal distinguishing valid data from invalid data and causing the valid data to be captured in one of said storage means while the invalid data is clocked out of said storage means;
generating a second signal indicating that valid data has been captured by said storage means;
and generating a plurality of third signals to clock the captured valid data from said storage means into a utilization device.
Description
CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

The present invention is related to the following U.S. Pat. Applications, all of which have been filed on even date herewith, and assigned to NCR Corporation:

SYMBOL DECODING SYSTEM, co-pending application Ser. No. 043,933, filed May 30 1979, by Amacher et al., now U.S. Pat. No. 4,253,018;

SLOT SCANNING SYSTEM, co-pending application Ser. No. 043,928, by Naseem et al.;

TOPOGRAPHY FOR I.C. PATTERN RECOGNITION ARRAY, co-pending application Ser. No. 043,929, by James et al.;

TOPOGRAPHY FOR I.C. FRAME CONTROL CHIP, co-pending application Ser. No. 043,930, by Gardner et al.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to a novel method and means for decoding a high density multiple bar code from a record medium at a high rate of speed and more particularly, relates to an NMOS/LSI chip which receives both valid and invalid data from a pattern recognition chip and extracts only the data which is valid. This valid data is then transmitted to a microprocessor for assembling into a readable form.

The use of bar coded symbols or labels intended to be read by optical scanning equipment as a means for identifying new data useful in processing items sold in the retail industry has been widely accepted to the point that a particular bar code known as the Universal Product Code (UPC) has been established as the industry standard for the grocery and other related retail industries. In the multiple bar code, such as the UPC, each decimal number or character is represented by two pairs of vertical bars and spaces within a 7-bit pattern wherein a binary 1 bit represents a dark module or bar of a predetermined width and a binary 0 represents a light module or space. Thus, the decimal or character 1 may be represented in the UPC code by the 7-bit pattern 0011001. In keeping with the format, the decimal 1 would be comprised of an initial space of a 2-bit width, followed by a 2-bit wide bar, another 2-bit space and a 1-bit wide bar. For each character or decimal of the system there are two bars and two spaced which have a total width of seven modules or bits. The width of each of the bars or spaces which comprise a character may be 1, 2, 3 or 4 modules wide as long as the sum of the bars and spaces is seven bits or modules wide.

A multiple bar code, such as the UPC, is normally read by an optical scanner whih may take the form of a hand-held wand or a scanner mechanism located in a check-out counter. The optical scanner will scan the bar code pattern and generate signals representing the bafs and space for transmission to the processing apparatus which determines the character represented by the bar code pattern.

Prior optical readers generally store the electrical signals generated as a result of scanning the bar code pattern until the accumulated signals stored are sufficient to allow the processing apparatus to initiate a recognition operation to determine the character represented by the scanned bar code pattern. Because of the speed in which the scanning operation is performed, the cost of the prior optical readers in processing the electrical signals has been unduly expensive, which in many instances has prevented the readers from reaching the marketplace. It is therefore the principal object of this invention to provide a low-cost optical character reader. It is another object of this invention to provide a low-cost optical character reader system which operates at a relatively high rate of speed without a loss of recognition efficiency. It is a further object of this invention to provide a system for filtering out invalid data embodied in an NMOS/LSI chip.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In order to carry out these objects, there is provided a high speed optical character reader system which includes a slot scanner mechanism for scanning the bar pattern of a symbol or coded tag which bar pattern includes a plurality of bars and spaces. The data obtained by scanning the tag is decoded by a pattern recognition array incorporated in an NMOS/LSI chip, and then transmitted to a second NMOS/LSI chip which includes a plurality of buffers, flip-flops, shift registers, and discrete logic elements. This chip receives the data, much of which is invalid, and separates it into four groups. When the data stored in one of the groups is determined to be valid, it is sent to a microprocessor chip. From this valid data, the microprocessor can determine: in which direction the tag was scanned; the type of tag being scanned; wheter the segment read is a left half or right half of a tag; and if a valid read operation has occurred. Other features and advantages of the present invention will be apparent from the preferred embodiment hereinafter set forth and illustrated in the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a graphical representation of a symbol or coded label such as a UPC coded symbol;

FIG. 2 is a graphical representation of the character structure of the UPC symbol;

FIG. 3 is a table showing the code structure of the UPC symbol character;

FIGS. 4A and 4B are graphical representations of the bar pattern and the transformed binary symmetrical signal;

FIG. 5 is a graphical representation of a bar code illustrating the dimensional relationships utilized in the present recognition system; and

FIG. 6 is a block diagram of the various arrays which comprise the pattern recognition and scanning system.

FIGS. 7A and 7B taken together show a block diagram of the frame control array, including the terminal and microprocessor interfaces;

FIG. 8 is a diagram showing the data latch section of the input interface logic;

FIG. 9 is a diagram showing the frame decode section of the input interface logic;

FIG. 10 is a diagram showing the function decode section of the input interface logic;

FIG. 11 is a diagram showing the frame φ state counter logic;

FIG. 12 is a diagram showing the INCBφ delay buffer logic;

FIG. 13 is a diagram showing the frame φ capture logic;

FIG. 14 is a diagram showing the frame 1 state counter logic;

FIG. 15 is a diagram showing the INMARG1 delay buffer logic;

FIG. 16 is a diagram showing the frame 1 capture logic;

FIGS. 17A and 17B taken together show the FφA shift register logic;

FIG. 18 is a diagram showing the logic circuit for alerting the microprocessor that a segment has been captured;

FIG. 19 is a diagram showing the logic circuit for controlling the SR6 and SR7 data lines of the SR data bus;

FIG. 20 is a diagram showing the logic circuit for the ROM which interprets the parity data of a segment;

FIG. 21 is a diagram showing the periodical symbol capture logic;

FIG. 22 is a diagram showing the logic circuitry associated with clocking the periodical data;

FIGS. 23A and 23B taken together show the FφC shift register logic;

FIGS. 24A-24C inclusive taken together show the microprocessor command decode logic;

FIG. 25 is a diagram showing the logic circuits for generating the shift register used, frame reset, parity read, chip reset, and terminal read and write commands.

FIG. 26 is a diagram showing the logic circuits for generating the read parity and set nomarg commands.

FIG. 27 is a diagram showing the logic circuitry for sending data from microprocessor to the terminal;

FIG. 28 is a diagram showing the logic circuitry for sending data from the terminal to the microprocessor;

FIG. 29 is a diagram showing the microprocessor and its associated logic circuitry;

FIG. 30 is a graphical representation of a bar-coded multi-symbol, such as is found on periodicals.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PRESENT EMBODIMENT

Referring now to FIG. 1, there is shown a graphical representation of a UPC symbol or coded label. The UPC symbol is made up of a series of light and dark parallel bars which comprise twelve characters. Among the twelve characters, two characters are the industry code and a modulo check character, the remaining ten characters are the main code representing data associated with a merchandise item. As shown in FIG. 1, included is a readable number printed in OCR-B font. In addition to the series of light and dark parallel bars, the UPC symbol includes spaces on both sides which are referred to as the left and right margins. Other characteristics of the UPC symbol include the following:

(1) The overall shape of the symbol is rectangular;

(2) Each character of a UPC code is represented by two dark bars and two light spaces;

(3) Each character is comprised of seven equal data elements called modules;

(4) Each module can be light or dark;

(5) Each bar may be composed of 1, 2, 3, or 4 dark modules. Light spaces may also be composed of 1, 2, 3, or 4 modules;

(6) Each character is independent;

(7) The right-most character of the symbol is a modulo check character while the left-most digit of the symbol indicates a system in which this symbol is encoded;

(8) The size of the UPC symbol is variable, that is, it may be large or small without affecting its readability. The UPC symbol may consist of only six characters having the same arrangement as shown in FIG. 1;

(9) The series of light and dark parallel bars are separated from the margins on each side by left and right guard bar patterns and includes a center band pattern located at the center of the UPC symbol.

Referring now to FIG. 2 there is shown a graphical representation of the character structure of the UPC symbol. As shown, each encoded UPC character is made up of two dark bars and two light spaces each composed of a differing number of modules. By assigning a 1 which corresponds to the black module and a 0 to a white module, the lefthand character represents (0101111) which denotes the character 6 and the right hand character represents (0001101) which denotes the character 0. The structure of the character code is not uniquely determined by each character, but is different according to which side of the center band pattern the character is located on. It is thus arranged that the light modules and the black modules are reversed as the character is located on the right or left sides, and as a result an odd number of black modules is included in each character code on the left hand side and an even number of black modules is included in each character code on the right hand side as indicated in FIG. 3. This parity relation provides information for determining the read-out direction of the codes. With this arrangement, the left-hand characters always start with light bars and the right-hand characters always start with dark bars (reading left to right). The whole structure of the character codes is as shown in the Table in FIG. 3. It should be noted that the number of dark modules in the left side digit is always 3 or 5 while the number is always 2 or 4 for the right hand digit. These characteristics are used as a parity check. The left side digits have odd parity while the right side digits have even parity.

After a character is scanned, each module is assigned a binary value. Thus, as shown in FIGS. 4A and 4B, scanning of the modules in the direction as noted, a binary 1 signal is generated upon the sensing of a black bar, while a binary 0 signal is generated upon the sensing of a light bar or space. Because of problems in printing, it is uncommon for the width of the light bar and the black bar to be of the ideal value. Therefore, in decoding the UPC symbol, this condition must be taken into consideration.

In addition, the tolerances for a UPC symbol or tag are larger for the space that starts or ends a character. Because of the print condition of the bar and space alluded to above, it has been found that the dimension tolerances between similar edges are better than between dissimilar edges, that is measuring the distance between trailing edges of adjacent bars and spaces or measuring the distance between the leading edges of adjacent bars and spaces produces data which gives high recognition efficiency to the system.

Referring now to FIG. 5, there is illustrated the present method for recognizing the characters represented by the pattern of the UPC bar code as shown in FIG. 1. As previously described, each character comprises two dark bars and two white bars or spaces. Representing each bar and space as an interval, it will be seen that each character is composed of four intervals, where each interval is composed of the same background, either dark or white. To represent the most recent interval that has been sensed by the scanner, the designation IN is used with the designation VN representing the bar for that interval. The designation IN is an 11 bit binary number generated in a manner to be described hereinafter. To designate the interval preceding the current interval, the notation IN-1 and VN-1 is used. For the interval before that, the notation IN-2 and VN-2 is used and so on. The sum of the four consecutive intervals scanned by the scanner is shown in FIG. 5 by the notation SN where SN equals IN plus IN-1 plus IN-2 and IN-3. For each interval scanned, the system examines the three preceding scanned intervals together with the current scanned interval and assignal a hexadecimal value. Each interval that is scanned is then classified as a bar (binary 1) or a space (binary 0). If VN is a binary 1 (bar), then IN +IN-1 and IN-1 +IN-2 are compared to one half SN, 23/64 SN and 41/64 SN. From this comparison two sets of weights can be found. Each of these weights will be either 2, 3, 4 or 5. From these weights the system will determine if a character is odd or even parity. Further utilizing these weights, the system will establish the characters 0, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 9. However, two sets of ambiguous characters are found. The characters 1 and 7 are ambiguous, that is, both have the same apparent configuration, and also the characters 2 and 8. To distinguish between the characters 2 and 8 requires finding if the interval IN-1 of each character is greater than the interval IN-2 . If it is greater, the character is 2. Odd parity 1 and 7 can be separated by determining if intervals IN is greater than the interval IN-1. If in this case it is greater, the character is a 1. Even parity 1 and 7 requires that the term 21/32 IN-2 is greater than IN-1 . In this latter case, if the term is greater, the character is a 1. In all of these cases, the single intervals were all used to determine the ambiguous characters.

Upon the scanning of each interval, the system will sum the three previus intervals together with the current scanned interval and then compare the sum of those four intervals SN (FIG. 5) with the previous sum SN generated to determine if they are equal within a predetermined limit. Thus, a signal EQUAL indicating equality will be generated if 27/32 SN is less than SN-4 and SN is greater than 27/32 SN-4 and no error is detected. An error condition exists where the width of an inerval exceeds the predetermined count.

Referring to FIG. 1, it will be seen that the bar code symbol has left and right margins and the center band portion of the code. When scanning from left to right as viewed in FIG. 1, the left margin will be characterized as the in margin while the right margin will be characterized as the out margin. Similarly, the left portion of the center band will be characterized as the in center band and the right portion of the center band will be characterized as the out center band. These characteristics are reversed where the scanning takes place from a right to left direction. In order to identify this condition, the hexadecimal number being generated as a result of scanning each interval will indicate whether the interval scanned is a part of the in or out margin or the in or out center band is generated. The in margin is detected if there is a wide space interval adjacent to a guard bar. Thus, if (IN-6 +IN-7) 5/16 is greater than IN-4 +IN-5 and SN is less than 27/32 SN-4 and VN-4 and VN-5, the interval is part of the in margin and a bit in the hexadecimal output number will indicate such a condition. With respect to the out margin, if (IN +IN-1) 5/16 is greater than IN-1 +IN-2 and SN-4 is less than 27/32 SN and VN-3 and VN-2, the interval is part of the out margin and the hexadecimal number generated by the system will indicate such a condition. The out center band will be detected if an ambiguous character (1, 7, 2 or 8) is detected and if SN is less than 27/32 SN-4 and VN of the current inteval together with the VN-1 together with the next interval scanned being any ambiguous character and the in margin is not detected, the hexadecimal number being outputted by the system will indicate the interval is part of the out center band. The in center band will be detected if any ambiguous character is detected and SN-4 is less than 27/32 SN and VN -5 and VN-4 together with the finding of the previous interval is an ambiguous character and if the out margin had not been detected, the hexadecimal output number will indicate that the inverval is a portion of the in center band. It will thus be seen that upon the scanning of each interval, the system will apply in parallel the above-cited logic test to determine the characteristics of the scanned interval, which characteristics are embodied as part of the binary hexadecimal number together with the additional binary bits generated for use in recognizing the character contained in the hexadecimal number being outputted at that time. As pointed out previously, each interval scanned will result in the outputting of a hexadecimal number which contains four binary-coded decimal (BCD) bits with only a portion of the hexadecimal numbers outputted being valid.

Referring now to FIG. 6 there is shown a block diagram of the character recognition system in which the present embodiment is utilized including a slot scanner 20 which causes a laser beam to be reflected to produce a scanned pattern above and in front of a slot or opening adjacent the laser. If a UPC symbol or tag is placed such that the laser beam crosses the tag thereby reflecting the light from the bars and spaces which compose the UPC tag, a photodetector receiving the reflected light will transform the reflected light into an electrical signal. A video amplifier (not shown) located in the scanning unit generates, in response to the generated electrical signals, digital pulses STV (Set Video) indicating a space-to-bar transition and RTV (Reset Video) indicating a bar-to-space transition. The time interval between these pulses is a function of the width of the bar or space. The pulse width of the signals STV and RTV can be from 25 ns. to 2 us sec. Valid signals alternate are never closer together than 350 ns. This means that following a valid STV or RTV, multiple pulses may occur during this 350 ms. time period.

These time intervals are transmitted to a counter control chip 22 (FIG. 6) in which the inervals are converted to a binary number by an interval counter (not shown) and then transmitted to a FIFO (First-In, First-Out) IC array (not shown). The FIFO time averages the time between intervals to an acceptable period. Either of the signals STV and RTV will stop the interval counter and cause that interval count along with the state of a VIDEO flip-flop (not shown) to be stored in a FIFO shift register (not shown). The VIDEO flip-flop will be true for a bar. The interval counter at this point is reset and the next interval count is started. If the output of the interval counter is greater than 1280 counts (32us.), an overflow condition is created. In the overflow state, ever 800 ns. of the count of 1280 and the last state of the VIDEO flip-flop will be loaded into the FIFO shift register. The occurence of the next STV or RTV signal will result in the loading of an additional 1280 count into the FIFO shift register. This condition will cause an error signal to be generated which, as will be described more fully hereinafter, will be sensed by the system at this time. Using this error signal, the system will disregard the data that is being generated by the slot scanner unit 20 and the counter control chip 22. The data contained in the FIFO shift registers located in the counter control chip 22 will be outputted to a decoder chip 24 under the control of clock pulses generated by a 40 Mhz. oscillator 26. The FIFO shift registers will output 11 bits of binary data representing the width of the interval being scanned over bus 23 (FIG. 6) together with a VIDEO signal indicating whether the interval is a bar or a space. Also outputted from the counter control chip 22 to the decoder chip 24 are clock pulses CLK.

The decoder chip 24 (FIG. 6) contains a number of binary adders, comparators, shift registers and discrete logic elements which are used to decode the data being scanned by the slot scanner unit 20. The decoder chip 24 will output a hexadecimal number which includes four BCD bits representing a decimal character in addition to indicating margins, center bands and error. Three additional binary bits are outputted by the decoder chip 24 which represent the signal MARK to indicate the interval is a bar or a space, the signal EQUAL indicating that the current interval taken together with the three previous intervals are either equal or not equal in width to the previous four intervals and the signal PARITY indicating that the interval is odd parity if true or even parity if false, thereby locating the interval on the left or right side of the center band.

The output signals from the decoder chip 24 are transmitted to a frame control chip 28 (FIG. 6) which is the subject of the present invention and which separates the valid data from the invalid data being outputted by the decoder chip 24. The frame control chip 28 filters out this valid data by checking for framing character, that is , in and out margins, in and out center bands, and character equality to identify the valid characters being decoded by the decoder chip 24. A good segment of valid data is then transmitted over bus 29 to a microprocessor chip 30 for further processing. The frame control chip 28 functions also as a communication adapter for transmitting data to be sent from the microprocessor through an interface adapter 32 to a host terminal 34 over bus 33. The microprocessor chip 30 monitors photodetectors in the slot scanner unit 20 to determine when an item is in position to be read by the slot scanner. This data is transmitted to the microprocessor 30 over a bus 36 coupled to a scanner control unit 38. Upon receiving the required control signals, the microprocessor will then start monitoring the frame control chip 28 for information. The microprocessor does correlation analysis and modulo ten check to determine if it has a valid tag. Once a valid tag is assembled, the data is transmitted to the host terminal through the interface adapter 32. Reference should be made to the previously cited co-pending applications of Amacher et al., Ser. No. 043,933, filed May 30, 1979, now U.S. Pat. No. 4,253,018 and Janes et al., Ser. No. 043,929, filed May 30, 1979, for a full disclosure of the decoder chip 24, Gardner et al., Ser. No. 043,930, filed May 30, l979, for a full disclosure of the frame control chip 28, and Naseem et al., Ser. No. 043,928, filed May 30, 1979, for a full disclosure of the microprocessor chip 30, each assigned to the assignee of the present application, which disclosures are fully incorporated into this application by reference.

The basic circuit configuration of the present invention is illustrated in FIGS. 7A and 7B. The input logic interface 80 receives data from the pattern recognition array located in the decoder chip 24 (FIG. 6). The input interface logic 80 includes an input latch, a BCD function decoder, a frame decoder, and a shift register data latch.

Four binary coded hexadecimal data bits plus a parity bit which are received from the decoder chip 24 (FIG. 6) are outputted from the input logic interface 80 to each of a group of twelve shift registers 81a-c, 82a-c, 83a-c and 84a-c, (FIG. 7A) which are used to capture valid data. The capture of the data by the shift registers is controlled by four frame state counters 85a-d. These four counters use the data generated by the BCD function and frame decoders transmitted from the input interface logic 80 to decide which segments of data are valid and should be captured. The shift register in which the valid data is contained notifies the mcroporcessor 30 (FIG. 7B) when a valid segment is captured.

The valid data is transmitted over the SR data bus 88 (FIG. 7A and 7B) to the command decode logic 90 (FIG. 7B), which also contains bus drivers. This interface sends the valid data to the microprocessor 30 over the microprocessor data bus DB 29.

The SR data bus 88 also connects the command decode logic 90 with a host communication interface 94. This interface is necessary to couple the microprocessor with a peripheral device, such as a terminal 34. The terminal is linked to the communication interface 94 via an optically coupled interface adapter (OCIA) 32 over bus 33. When the microprocessor 30 wishes to send data to the terminal 34, the data travels over the DB bus 29 to the host communication interface 94, which in turn signals the terminal 34.

The terminal 34 sends data to the microprocessor 30 in a similar manner. The terminal 34 clocks the data via the OCIA 32 to the host communication interface 94, which notifies the microprocessor 30 that there is data waiting. The microprocessor 30 then transmits a signal to the interface 94 which loads the data onto the SR data bus 88 for transmission to the command decode interface 90. The interface 90 transfers the data from the SR bus 88 to the DB bus 29 and sends the data to the microprocessor 30.

The parity bit of the valid data segment appearing on the SR bus 88 is detected by a parity decode ROM 99. The ROM 99 receives the parity data from the SR bus 88 and sends the decoded information to the command decode logic 90, which sends the information to the processor 30 via the DB bus 29.

The data outputted from the pattern recognition array in the decoder chip 24 (FIG. 6) consists of seven bits: four bits define a hexadecimal number, one bit detects parity, one bit detects equality, and one bit, called a MARK bit, tells whether the data represented is a space or a bar. As shown in FIG. 8, the four hexadecimal data bits (20 -23) plus the PARITY bit P and the EQUAL bit EQ are transmitted through a line driver 100 and are clocked into a flip-flop 102 by CLK1. CLK1 is generated by transmitting a clocking signal CLK through a gate 104 and a line driver 106. The four hexadecimal data bits (20 -23) are inputted to a NAND gate 108 whose output signal NEXTERR is inverted by a gate 110. The signal NEXT ERR, outputted from gate 110, is present when all four data bits are present, and it indicates that an error has been detected by the pattern recognition array.

The MARK bit M (FIG. 89 is transmitted through a driver 106 and is coupled with a signal NEXTERR outputted from NAND gate 108 via a NAND gate 112. The output of gate 112 is connected to the inverted input of an OR gate 114. The output of gate 114 enables a flip-flop 116, which, together with a flip-flop 118, comprise a two binary counter 119. As each interval of data is received from the pattern recognition array, the counter increments once, generating a total of four states. The output signals ML and ML (Mark Latch) of flip-flop 16, and the output signals IDF and IDF (ID flip-flop) of flip-flop 18, are decode by gates 120-126 (FIG. 9) whose output decoded signals are latched into flip-flop 140. The four output signals of the flip-flop 140 indicated in FIG. 9 are the decoded reference frames FRφ, FR1, FR2, and FR3, which clock the input data from the pattern recognition array into the proper shift registers.

Any time the input data being read corresponds to a bar or space located in the symbol (FIG. 1) between the in margin and the center band, there will always be either a frame 1 or a frame 3 capture. When the bar of space is between the center band and the out margin, there will always be either a frame φ or a frame 2 capture. As shown in FIG. 8, the signal ML which appears on the Q output of flip-flop 116 is coupled with the signal NEXTERR appearing on the output of the inverter 110 (FIG. 8) by a NAND gate 142, whose output is connected to the second inverted input of an OR gate 114 which gate enables the counter 119 to advance one count upon the occurrence of the signal NEXTERR going low when the signal ML is high.

As shown in FIG. 8, the 20, 21, and 22 bits of the BCD data being outputted from flip-flop 102 are inverted by gates 144-148. The EQUAL bit EQ appearing on the Q5 output of flip-flop 102 is transmitted to a flip-flop 149. The 20, 21, and 22 bits from flip-flop 102, the 20, 21, and 22 bits, appearing on the output of the inverters 144-148 inclusive, and the 23 bit are decoded by AND gates 150-158 (FIG. 10) whose output signals are latched into a flip-flop 164. The output signals of flip-flop 164 indicate whether a segment of data transmitted from the pattern recognition array represents an out margin (OUTMARG), in margin (INMARG), out center band (OUTCB), in center band (INCB), or error (ERR).

Each of the output signals FRφ, FR1, FR2, and FR3 from the flip-flop 140 (FIG. 9) is applied to one of the frame state counters 85a--d (FIG. 7A). The operation of the FRφ counter 85(a) and the FR1 counter 85 (b) will be described here, with the understanding that the FR2 counter 85(c) operates in a similar manner to FRφ, and the FR3 counter 858(d) similar to FR1.

As shown in FIG. 11, the output signal FRφ is applied to one input of a NAND gate 166. The signals INCB, from flip-flop 164 (FIG. 10), and EQL, from flip-flop 149 (FIG. 8), are applied to the inverted inputs of an OR gate 168, whose output is connected to the second input of gate 166. The output of gate 166 is coupled to the inverted input of an OR gate 169, as are the signals ERR and OUTMARG, from flip-flop 164 (FIG. 10). The output signal FRφ is also coupled with a signal CLK SR, a system clock, via a NAND gate 170 (FIG. 12). The output of gate 170 is a clock for a flip-flop 172. The input to flip-flop 172 is the signal INCB, which is generated by transmitting the signal INCB from flip-flop 164 (FIG. 10) through an inverter 174 (FIG. 12). The purpose of flip-flop 172 is to generate a four interval buffer of the INCB signal. The flip-flop 172 is cleared by the signals OUTMARG and ERR, both transmitted from flip-flop 164 (FIG. 10). These two signals are applied to the inverted inputs of an OR gate 176 whose output is coupled with the signal DVAL, a system clock, via an AND gate 178. The output signal φ MARGERR of gate 178 is connected to the master reset of flip-flop 172.

Referring again to FIG. 11, the output of OR gate 169 is coupled with the system clock signal CLK SR via a NAND gate 180, whose output signal is transmitted to an inverted input of AND gates 182 and 184. The signal INCBφ transmitted from flip-flop 172 (FIG. 12) is applied to the second inverted input of AND gate 182, while the inverted signal output INCBφ of flip-flop 172 is applied to the second inverted input of gate 184. The output of gate 182 is connected to the master reset of flip-flop 188, and is used to clear flip-flop 188. The output of gate 184 is connected to the master set of flip-flop 188 for setting the flip-flop in a manner that will now be described.

When the data from the pattern recognition array in the decoder chip 24 (FIG. 6) indicates that in center band is being scanned, the signal INCBφ will go low four clock pulses later, and the output of gate 184 will cause an eight bit binary counter 193, comprised of flip-flops 188, 190, and 192, to be set to 1. When flip-flop 188 is set to 1, flip-flops 190 and 192 are set to zero, since the output of gate 180 is inverted by a gate 194, and the output of gate 194 is connected to the master reset of flip-flops 190 and 192. Flip-flop 188, which is the least significant bit of the counter, is clocked by a four input NAND gate 195. Three of the inputs to gate 195 are signals EQL, from flip-flop 149 (FIG. 8), FRφ, from flip-flop 140 (FIG. 9), and CLK SR. The fourth input is connected to the output of an OR gate 196. The three inverted inputs of gate 196 are taken from the inverted outputs of flip-flops 188 (Qφ1), 190 (Qφ2), and 192 (Qφ3).

The signal appearing on the inverted output of flip-flop 188 is fed back to its input and is also connected to the clock input of flip-flop 190. The signal appearing on the inverted output of 190 is fed back to its input, and is also connected to the clock input of flip-flop 192. The signal appearing on the inverted output of flip-flop 192 is fed back to its input, allowing the flip-flops 188-192 inclusive to function as an eight bit binary counter.

In operation, the frame state counter FRφ 85(a) (FIG. 7A and 11) is initially set to 1 by the output signal of gate 184 (FIG. 11) and is clocked by the system clock signal CLK SR via gate 195, each time the EQL and FRφ signals are present and the counter is not a zero. When the counter is counted up to 6, indicating that six characters have been stored in the FRφ shift registers 81a-81c inclusive (FIG. 7A), (or when the counter has counted to four in the case of a four character symbol), the frame state counter 85a signals the shift registers that a segment has been captured in a manner that will now be described.

Referring now to FIG. 13, the frame capture signal FRφCAP is generated by a four input NAND gate 198 whose output is inverted by a gate 200. The FRφ output signal of flip-flop 140 (FIG. 9) is connected to one input of gate 198, while the system clock signal DVAL, is connected to another input. A third input is connected to the output of an AND gate 202, on whose inverted inputs appear the signals Qφ1 from flip-flop 188 (FIG. 11), and Qφ3 from flip-flop 192 (FIG. 11). The fourth input to gate 198 is a signal OUTMARGφ, which is generated by a combination of several gates in the following manner. The signal OUTMARGφ appears on the output of an OR gate 204 which as applied to one of its inputs the signal OUTMARG, appearing on the output of an inverter 206, whose input signal OUTMARG is generated by flip-flop 164 (FIG. 10). The second input to gate 204 is connected to the output of a two input OR gate 208.

One input of gate 208 is enabled when a four character segment is read by the scanner, and the other input is enabled by a six character segment in a manner that will now be described. A two input AND gate 210 has inputs of EQ, which is generated by the signal EQL from flip-flop 149 (FIG. 8) transmitted through an inverter 212, and the signal NOMARG, a microprocessor command. When a four character segment is scanned, EQ and NOMARG are both high, enabling AND gate 210. The output of AND gate 210 enables gates 208 and 204, causing the signal OUTMARGφ to go high.

An AND gate 214 has appearing on its inputs the signals NOMARG, a microprocessor command, Qφ2 from flip-flop 190 (FIG. 11), and Qφ3 from flip-flop 192 (FIG. 11). When a six character segment is read, all three of these signals go high, enabling gates 214 (FIG. 13), 208, and 204, thereby causing OUTMARGφ to go high. The NOMARG command is used to capture data from a symbol which does not have margins. When the symbol being read contains margins, the data capture is controlled by the signal OUTMARG at gate 204. This signal goes low, causing OUTMARGφ, from gate 204, to go high. When the eight bit binary counter 193 shown in FIG. 11 is counted to either 4 or 6, the output signals Qφ1 and Qφ3 are both low, enabling gate 202 (FIG. 13). Since the OUTMARGφ signal goes high and FRφ is also high, the system clock signal DVAL toggles gate 198, causing FRφCAP to go high. This signal is used by the shift registers 81a-81c inclusive (FIG. 7A) to capture the valid data.

Referring now to FIG. 14, there is shown the logic associated with the frame 1 state counter 85(b) (FIG. 7A) in which the signal FR1 from the flip-flop 140 (FIG. 9) is applied to the frame state counter at an input to a NAND gate 166a. The signals INMARG, transmitted from flip-flop 164 (FIG. 10), and EQL, transmitted from flip-flop 149 (FIG. 8), are applied to the inverted inputs of an OR gate 168a, whose output is connected to the second input of gate 166a. The output of 166a is connected to an inverted input of an OR gate 169a, as do the signals ERR and OUTMARG, from flip-flop 164 (FIG. 10). The signal FR1 is also coupled with the system clock CLK SR via a NAND gate 170a (FIG. 15). The output of gate 170a is a clock input for a flip-flop 172a, whose data input is the signal IN MARG, which is generated by transmitting signals INAMARG and NOMARG to the inverted inputs of an OR gate 174a. The purpose of flip-flop 172a is to generate a four interval buffer of the INMARG signal. Flip-flop 172a is cleared by the signal φMARGERR from AND gate 178a via an OR gate 176a.

Referring to FIG. 14, the output of OR gate 169a is coupled with the system clock signal CLKSR via a NAND gate 180a, whoe output signal is transmitted to an inverted input of AND gates 182a and 184a. The signal INMARG1 transmitted from flip-flop 172a (FIG. 15) is applied to the second inverted input of gate 182a, together with the signal INMARG1 (FIG. 15) being applied to the second inverted input of gate 184a. the output of gate 182a is connected to the master reset of the flip-flop 188a, and is used to clear the flip-flop 188a. The output of gate 184a is connected to the master set of flip-flop 188a. When the data from the pattern recognition array in the decoder chip 24 indicates that an in margin is being scanned, the signal IMMARG1 will go low four clock pulses late, and the output of 184a will cause an eight bit binary counter 193a comprised of flip-flops 188a, 190a, and 192a, to be set to 1. When flip-flop 188a is set to 1, flip-flops 190a and 192a are set to zero, since the output of gate 180a is inverted by a gate 194a, and the output of 194a is connected to the master reset of flip-flops 190a and 192a.

Flip-flop 188a, which is the least significant bit of the counter, is clocked by a four input NAND gate 195a. Appearing on three of the inputs to gate 195a are the signals EQL from flip-flop 149 (FIG. 8), FR1, from flip-flop 40 (FIG. 9), and the system clock CLK SR. The fourth input is connected to the output of an OR gate 169a. The three inverted inputs of gates 196a are taken from the inverted outputs of flip-flops 188a (Q11), 190a, (Q12), and 192a (Q13). As shown in FIG. 14, the signal appearing on the inverted output of flip-flop 188a is fed back to the input and is also connected to the clock input of flip-flop 190a. The signal appearing on the inverted output of 190a is fed back to the input, and is also connected to the clock input of flip-flop 192a. The signal appearing on the inverted output of flip-flop 192a is fed back to its input.

In operation, the frame state counter FR1 85(b) (FIG. 7A) is initially set to 1 and is clocked by the CLK SR signal via gate 195a each time the EQL and FR1 signals are present and the counter is not at zero. When the counter has counted up to 6, indicating that six characters have been stored in the FR1 shift registers 82a-82c (FIG. 7A) (or when the counter has counted to 4 in the case of a four character symbol) the frame state counter 85(b) signals the shift registers that a segment has been caputred.

Referring now to FIG. 16, the frame capture signal FR1CAP is generated by a four input NAND gate 198a whose output is inverted by an inverter 200a. The FR1 signal is connected to one input of gate 198a, and the system clock signal DVAL is connected to another input. A third input to the gate 198a is connected to the output of an AND gate 202a, whose inverted inputs are connected to Q11 tramsmitted from flip-flop 188a (FIG. 14), and to Q13 from flip-flop 192a (FIG. 14). The fourth input to gate 198a is the signal OUTCB, which is the output of an inverter 204a, whose input OUTCB is generated by flip-flop 164 (FIG. 10). When the eight bit binary counter 193a (FIG. 14) is counted to either 4 or 6, the output signals Q11 and Q13 are both low, enabling gate 202a (FIG. 16). When an OUTCB signal is present along with signal FR1, the system clock signal DVAL toggles gate 198a, causig the signal FR1CAP to go high. This signal is used by the shift registers 82a-82c (FIG. 7A) to capture the valid data.

Referring now to FIG. 7A, there will be descirbed the operation of the shift register in capturing the valid data being outputted from the pattern recognition array located in the decoder chip 24 (FIG. 6). As shown in FIG. 8, the outputs of flip-flop 102 which comprise the hexadecimal bits 20 -23, and the parity bit P transmitted through a line driver 220 to flip-flop 149. The outputs of flip-flop 149 are connected to the input of each of the twelve shift registers 81a-c, 82a-c, 83a-c, and 84a-c (FIG. 7A). The twelve shift registers are divided into four groups, with three shift registers associated with each frame state counter 85a-85d. For ease of explanation, the operation of only one shift register will be discussed, it being understood that such operation is similar in the other shift registers.

The circuit configuration of shift register 81a is shown in FIG. 17A and 17B. Each shift register is a 56 bit shift register composed of five 16 flip-flops 222-230. Each hexadecimal bit of the data plus the PARITY bit is inputted into one of the flip-flops. The data is clocked into the flip-flops via a NAND gate 232. The inputs to gate 232 are the signal FRφ, from flip-flop 140 (FIG. 9), which is high during frame φ, the signal FφA, which is initially high, and the system clock signal CLK SR. The data is clocked into the PARITY shift register 222 as the signal CLK SR toggles, while the hexadecimal data is clocked into the flip-flops 224-230 via a NOR gate 234. The NAND gate 232 also clocks a shift register 236 (FIG. 17A). The output of shift register 236 is connected to the input of a flip-flop 238 which is clocked by the signal FRφCAP transmitted from gate 200 (FIG. 13). In operation, when the sixth character is clocked into the flip-flops 222-230, the output of shift register 236 goes high. This output is transmitted to the input of flip-flop 238, and is clocked into the flip-flop, since the signal FRφCAP goes high when a segment is captured. The Q output signal FφA of flip-flop 238 goes high, while the Q output, FφA, goes low, thereby disabling gate 232, and removing the clocking signal from flip-flops 222-230.

The output signal FφA of flip-flop 238 is also used to clock a flip-flop 239 (FIG. 17B). When the segment captured by the shift register is a four character segment, the input signal Qφ2 to flip-flop 239 goes high. When the other input signal FφA to the flip-flop 239 goes high, the output signal 4φA of flip-flop 239 also goes high. This output signal is used to tell the microprocessor that the segment captured is a four character segment.

The output signal FφA is also inputted to a four input NAND gate 240 (FIG. 17A). Another input to gate 240 is the signal SYMCAP, which comprises the load signals from all twelve shift registers and goes to a low level if data is captured in any one of the shift registers. The third input signal, FRφ, is high during frame φ , and the fourth input signal, CLK SR, is the system clock signal. When a segment is captured in the shift register, the output of gate 240 will enable the inverted input of an OR gate 242 (FIG. 17A) which, together with OR gate 244, forms a latch 241.

The output signal LDFφA of gate 242, when going high, enables a NOR gate 246 (FIG. 18), and also a NOR gate 247 with inverted inputs, causing the output signal SYMCAP of gate 247 to go low. Signals similar to LDFφA transmitted from shift register 81b nd 81c (FIG. 7A) are also inputted to gate 246. Similar signals from shift registers 82a-c, 83a-c, and 84a-c are transmitted to gate 247 via NOR gates 248 and 249. The output signal SYMCAP is transmitted through a gate 250 directly to the microprocessor 30 (FIG. 6) as an interrupt, alerting it that a valid data segment has been captured.

The output signals of gates 246 and 249 are also transmitted to the input of a NAND gate 251, as shown in FIG. 19. The output of gate 251 is connected to an inverted input of an OR gate 252. The other input to gate 252 is normally high, and goes low only during the caputure of periodical data. The output of gate 252 is connected to an input of a tri-state buffer 253. When the load signal of one of the shift registers, such as LDFφA, goes high, the output of gate 251 goes high, causing the input to buffer 253 to go low. When the microprocessor 30 (FIG. 6) is ready to read the shift register, it generates a clocking signal SR RD (the generation of the microprocessor command signals is described later). The signal SR RD goes low, enabling buffer 253 and causing the output line SR6 of the SR data bus to go low. This signal aids the microprocessor in determining the type of segment which is captured in the shift register.

Referring again to FIG. 17A, the signal SR RD generated by the microprocessor 30 (FIG. 6) is transmitted to one input of a NAND gate 254. Appearing on the other input to gate 254 is the signal LDFφA, transmitted from gate 242. Appearing on the output of gate 254 is the signal LDφA, which enables a tri-state buffer 255 to load the data from flip-flops 244-230 onto the SR data bus. The signal SR RD toggles gates 254 and 234 until it has clocked out the stored characters in parallel from flip-flops 244-230 over the SR bus and through the level converters 256 and 257 and the tri-state driver 258 (FIG. 24B) to the microprocessor. The signal SR RD from the microprocessor is used to clock data into a flip-flop 259 (FIG. 20) from the data lines SR4 and SR5, this data being used by the microprocessor in interpreting the type of symbol read.

The parity bits P of the segment captured in the flip-flop 222 can be read by the microprocessor at this time. At this time, the flip-flop 222 has outputted all six bits in parallel to a tri-state buffer 260. The buffere 260 is controlled by a NAND gate 261, which is enabled by the signals LDFφA and PARTY transmitted from the OR gate 242 (FIG. 17A) and the microprocessor 30 (FIG. 6) respectively. Since the signal LDFφA is already high, PARTY, which is a microprocessor controlled signal, must go high to transmit the data, over lines SRφ-5, onto the SR bus. When the microprocessor 30 is ready to read the parity data, it sends a command which is decoded by the command decode array 90 (FIG. 7B), transmitting the PARTY signal to gate 261 and also to an inverting gate 263, which is shown in FIG. 20.

Referring to FIG. 20, the data appearing on lines SRφ-SR5 inclusive is latched into a flip-flop 264 and the signals converted by a level converter 265, enabling the signals to address a ROM 99. The signal PARDEC, which is another microprocessor based command, controls the chip select input to the ROM. When it is activated, it causes the address corresponding to the parity data to read out from the ROM 99 data to the microprocessor which indicates whether the segment read from the symbol is a left or a right half, whether it is rom one of a number of different type symbols or a symbol located on a periodical, and whether it was read forward or backward. This method of decoding saves approximately 200-300 bytes of ROM in the microprocessor, in addition to saving time.

Referring again to FIG. 17A, after the six characters and the parity data have been read into the microprocessor, a frame reset occurs in the following manner. A signal FR RST is generated by the microprocessor 30 (FIG. 6) and sent to a NAND gate 268, which receives the signal LDFφA from the OR gate 242 at another input. When the signal LDFφA is high, the signal FR RST enables gate 268 and also an inverted input to an OR gate 270. The output signal FφARST of gate 270, is connected to the master reset of flip-flop 238 and 239, causing the output signal FφA to go low, and also enabling the output signal LDFφA of gate 244 to go high. This, in turn, allows the signal SYMCAP to return to its high state, via gates 246 and 247 (FIG. 18). With the signal SYMCAP high, the microprocessor is now able to read another shift register which has captured a valid segment. The signal FφARST is also connected to the parallel load input to shift register 236, allowing it to begin a new count.

The reading of a UPC multi-symbol, such as occurs on a periodical, is accomplished in a similar manner to the reading of the other symbols. A UPC multi-symbol such as the type found on periodicals is shown in FIG. 30. The first symbol 296 can be of the type shown in FIG. 1. Following the first symbol is a six module wide blank space. The second symbol 298, smaller than the first, follows the blank area. This symbol begins with a bar one module wide, then a space one module wide, and next a bar two modules wide. Following this, there may be either two or five characters. The multi-symbol or periodical symbol is scanned in the same manner as a regular UPC symbol.

The capture of a periodical symbol is done only the FφC shift register 81(c) (FIG. 7A). The periodical latch, as will be described more fully hereinafter, is set by a command from the microprocessor. The output signal, PERIOD, generated by the latch is transmitted to a NAND gate 300 (FIG. 17B). The signal FRφCAP (FIG. 13) is also transmitted to gate 300. The third input to gate 300 is connected to the output of an AND gate 302. The six bits of data from flip-flop 222 (FIG. 17B) and the signal GOφB (FIG. 17A) from an OR gate 304 are all transmitted to the inverted inputs of gate 302. When the scanner is scanning the area between the two symbols on a periodical, the output of gate 302 will go high. The signals PERIOD and FRφCAP are also high, causing the output of gate 300 to go low. This output signal L2Rφ, is connected to a latch, 305, formed by OR gated 306 and 308 (FIG. 17B). When the signal L2Rφ goes low, latch 305 sets, and the output signal L2R of gate 306, goes high.

Another input to gate 306 of the latch 305 is the signal L2R2. This signal is the equivalent of L2Rφ, except that it is generated at frame 2 rather then frame φ. L2R2 is generated by a NAND gate 310. One input to the gate 310 is the signal PERIOD, and the other input is generated by an OR gate 312 via a NAND gate 314, using signals generated by frame 2 (not shown).

Referring to FIG. 21, there is shown the signals L2R and PERIOD being transmitted to a NAND gate 320. The signal START P, transmitted from the inverted output of a flip-flop 322, is also inputted to gate 320. When the scanner is in the area between the two tags during the scanning of a periodical label, all of these signals are high, enabling the system clock signal, CLK1, to toggle gate 320 thereby clocking the flip-flop 322. The data input to flip-flop 322 is the signal FφC, which is high when no data is captured in the FφC shift register 81c (FIG. 7). When the flip-flop 322 is clocked by gate 320, the output signal START P, goes high, and START P, the inverted output goes low, disabling gate 320. The signal START P is transmitted to the data input of a shift register 324 which is clocked into the shift register 324 by the system clock signal CLK1. After six CLK1 clock pulses, the Q5 output of shift register 324 goes high, which signal is transmitted to the master set input of a flip-flop 326, causing the output signal LOAD P of flip-flop 326 to go high. The high signal LOAD P is then transmitted to a NAND gate 328, where it is combined with the system clock signal DVAL. The output of gate 328 is connected to an inverted input of an OR gate 330 on whose other input will appear a signal FφCRST, which is the reset signal for the FφC shift register 81c. The signal FφCRST is similar to the reset signal FφARST (shown in FIG. 17A). The output signal of gate 330 is inverted by a gate 332, and then transmitted to the master reset input of shift register 324.

In operation, as long as signal START P is present, the flip-flop 324 will produce an output at Q5 after six pulses of CLK1, generating the signal LOAD P from flip-flop 326, which clears flip-flop 324 via gated 328, 330 and 332. This operation will cycle continuously until flip-flop 322, which generates START P, is cleared by a signal transmitted through an OR gate 334 and a NAND gate 336. The input signals to gate 336 are PER, a signal generated by the flip-flop 338, and the logic voltage supply VDD. The output of gate 336 is connected to an inverted input to gate 334. The other input to gate 334 is FφCRST. The output of gate 334 is connected to the master reset input to flip-flop 322.

The Q1 output of flip-flop 324 is connected to a NAND gate 340, while the Q2 output is connected to an inverted input of an AND gate 342. The other inverted input to gate 342 is connected to the Q0 output of flip-flop 338. In operation, after receiving the second clock pulse CLK1, the Q1 output from flip-flop 324 will be high, and the Q2 output low. The Q0 output from flip-flop 338 is also low at this time, enabling gate 342, whose output signal enables gate 340, since Q1 of flip-flop 324 is also high at this time. The output signal of gate 340 is inverted by the inverter 343 to generate a signal 1ST which is high for only one clock pulse of CLK1, since the next clock pulse causes Q2 of flip-flop 324 to go high, disabling gates 342 and 340.

The signal 1ST is transmitted to the input of a NOR gate 334 (FIG. 22). The other input to gate 344 is LOAD P transmitted from flip-flop 326 (FIG. 21). The output of gate 344 is connected to an inverted input of a four input OR gate 346, on whose other three inputs appear the signals ERR, OUTMARG, and INMARG, from flip-flop 164 (FIG. 10). The output of gate 346 is connected to one input of a NAND gate 348 on whose other inputs appear the signals START P, from flip-flop 322 (FIG. 21), and the system clock signal CLK SR. The output of gate 348 is the signal CLK P, which is used to clock the shift register 338 (FIG. 21). When the signal 1ST pulses, it enables gates 344 and 346, which allows the signal CLK SR to toggle gate 348, thereby generating the CLK P signal which in turn causes the shift register 338 to activate. After the 1ST signal is removed, CLK P can be generated by the LOAD P signal, or by the ERR, OUTMARG, or INMARG signals.

Referring again to FIG. 21, it will be seen that when the signal CLK P has pulsed six times, the Q5 output signal PER of shift register 338, goes high. The signal PER is transmitted to gate 336 (FIG. 21), which causes the flip-flop 322 to clear, disabling CLK P (FIG. 22) in the manner described previously.

The signal CLK P is transmitted to an inverted input of a NOR gate 350 (FIG. 22), the output of which is the signal CPφC, used to clock the periodical data into the flip-flop 352-358 (FIG. 23A) via an inverter 360. The signal CPφC can also be clocked for normal operation by a NAND gate 362, the operation of which is similar to gate 240 of FIG. 17A. The signal CLK P is also transmitted to an OR gate 364 (FIG. 22), the output of which is the signal CPφ, used to clock the parity data from the periodical symbol into a shift register 366 (FIG. 23B). The signal CPφis also used to clock shift register 368 (FIG. 23A) in normal operation, the operation of which is similar to shift register 236 of FIG. 17A. The signal CLK P (FIG. 22) can also be generated by the output of gate 362, which operation is similar to gate 232 of FIG. 17A.

Referring to FIG. 23A and 23B, the signal PER is also transmitted to the master set input of a flip-flop 370 (FIG. 23A). When the signal PER goes high, the output signal FφC of flip-flop 370, also goes high. The AND gates 372 and 374 are used to set flip-flop 370 during normal operation while the signal FφC is connected to a flip-flop 376 (FIG. 23B), used to designate a four character capture in normal operation, and which operates in a similar manner to flip-flop 239 of FIG. 17B. The gate 378 is an inverter which is used to reset flip-flop 376. The signal FφC is also transmitted to an AND gate 377 (FIG. 23A) whose other input is taken from the output of an AND gate 377, which has signals FφA and FφB appearing at its inputs. When the FφC register 81(c) (FIG. 7A) has captured some data, the output signal of gate 377 goes high which is transmitted to a NAND gate 380 on whose other inputs include the signal FRφ and SYMCAP which when high allow the input clock signal CLK SR to toggle gate 380, causing a latch 381 formed by OR gates 382 and 384 to be set. The output signal LDFφC of gate 382, also goes high, which causes the SYMCAP signal to go low via gates 246 and 247 (FIG. 18), signalling the microprocessor that a segment has been captured.

The signal LDFφC (FIG. 23A) is also transmitted to a NAND gate 385 (FIG. 19), where it is combined with the PER signal (FIG. 21) to generate the signal PERRD which enables gate 252, and causes the SR6 line to go high when buffer 253 is clocked by the microprocessor generated signal SR RD, and thus aids the microprocessor in interpreting the type of symbol being read. The signal PERRD is also transmitted to an OR gate 386 (FIG. 20). Since the signal PERRD is low at this time, it causes the D1 input of flip-flop 259 to go low, and it is clocked into flip-flop 259 by SR RD, also helping the microprocessor in interpreting the type of symbol being read.

Referring now to FIG. 22, the microprocessor 30 (FIG. 6) will generate the SR RD signal when it is ready to receive the data segment, sending that signal to a NAND gate 387. The load output signal LDφC of gate 387, going low, enables a tri-state buffer 388 (FIG. 23B) to load the data onto the SR data bus, and also causes CPφC to clock the data from flip-flops 352-358 to buffer 388. The microprocessor then clocks the parity data onto the SR data bus by generating the PARTY signal, which is combined with the signal LDFφC (FIG. 23A) at an AND gate 390 whose output signal enables a tri-state buffer 392 (FIG. 23B) to load the parity data onto the SR bus comprising the bus lines SR0-SR5 inclusive.

The FφC register 81(c) (FIG. 7A) is reset when the microprocessor generates the FR RST signal, causing flip-flop 370 (FIG. 23A) to clear via an AND gate 394 and an OR gate 396. The clearing of flip-flop 370 causes the LDFφC latch 381 to clear, allowing SYMCAP to return to the high state (FIG. 18), and allowing the shift register FφC to capture more data.

Referring now to FIG. 24A-24C inclusive, the microprocessor DB data bus 29 (FIG. 7B) contains eleven bus lines: data lines DB0-DB7, ALE (Address Latch Enable), WR (Write), and RD (Read). The bus lines are connected to buffers 400 and 402. The data lines DB2 through DB7 are connected to the inverted inputs of an AND gate 404 whose output signal COMND, is used to decode the microprocessor read (RD) and write (WR) memory commands into special chip commands. The DBφ and DB1 data lines from buffer 402 are inverted by gates 406 and 408, and the four signals DB1, DB1, DB0, DBφtogether with the COMND signal are decoded by NAND gates 410-416 (FIG. 24C) to generate the command signals PAR, SRD, COM, and RES which are clocked into a flip-flop 418 by the signal ALE from buffer 400, which is inverted by a gate 420 (FIG. 24A). The bus lines DBφ, DB1, and DB3 through DB7 are combined with the bus line DB2 outputted from an inverter gate 422, by an AND gate 424 and an inverter 426 to generate the signal CMNDφ4, which is also stored in flip-flop 418. The command signal CMNDφ4, PAR, SRD, COM, and RES are combined with the WR and RD signals from the microprocessor to generate the command functions for the frame control chip.

Referring now to FIG. 25, the RD signal is transmitted along with the PAR signal from flip-flop 418 to the inverted inputs of an AND gate 428 to generate the signal PARTY (microprocessor command φφRD). This signal, which is the parity read command, causes a valid parity segment which is captured in a shift register to be sent to the parity decode ROM 99 (FIG. 7B) via the SR data bus 88. The RD signal is also transmitted along with the SRD signal from flip-flop 418 (FIG. 24C) to the inverted inputs of an AND gate 430 (FIG. 25) to generate the signal SR RD (φ1 RD). This signal, which is the shift register read command, causes a valid captured data segment from a currently active shift register to be clocked onto the SR data bus and sent to the microprocessor. The SR RD signal is then transmitted through an inverter gate 432 to generate SR RD. The RD signal is also transmitted along with CMNDφ4 from flip-flop 418 to the inverted inputs of an AND gate 434 (FIG. 26) to generate the signal PARDEC (φ4 RD), which is the parity decode command, and allows the microprocessor to read the parity bit information from the parity decode ROM 99 (FIG. 7B). This signal is also transmitted through an inverter 436 (FIG. 26) to generate the PARDEC signal.

The WR signal generated by the microprocessor 30 is transmitted along with the SRD signal to the inverted inputs of an AND gate 438 (FIG. 25) to generate the FR RST signal (φ1 WR). This signal, which is the frame reset command, allows a shift register that has previously stored data to start collecting new data. The WR signal is also transmitted along with the CMNDφ4 signal to the inverted inputs of an AND gate 440 (FIG. 26) whose output is connected to a latch 441 formed by gates 442 and 444 (FIG. 26). The output signal NOMARG (φ4 WR) of gate 444 allows segment captures by the shift registers without a margin requirement. The latch 441 is cleared by transmitting the signal RESET to an input to gate 444.

A pair of microprocessor command signals are used to control the reading of periodical symbols. These signals include the RD signal which is transmitted aong with the RES signal from flip-flop 418 (FIG. 24C) to the inverted inputs of an AND gate 446 (FIG. 25) whose output is connected to a latch 447 formed by NOR gates 448 and 450. The output of gate 448, the PERIOD signal (φ3 RD), is the set periodical command, which enables the FφC shift register 81c (FIG. 7A) to capture a periodical tag. The latch 447 is reset by receiving the WR signal along with the RES signal applied to the inverted inputs of an AND gate 452. The output of gate 452 (FIG. 25) is connected to one input of gate 448 of the latch 447, and is also connected to one input of a NOR gate 454. The output signal (RESET (φ3 WR)), is the chip reset command, which causes a general reset of the logic contained on the chip. The other input to gate 454 is connected to the output of an inverter 456 on whose input appears the PWRRST signal. This signal also causes a general reset of the chip logic via the RESET signal. The RESET signal is transmitted to an inverter 458 which outputs the signal RESET. The RESET signal sets the frame counter to FRφ, resets the data captures of all twelve shift registers, and clears the send and receive logic of the host communication/OCIA interface in the manner previously described.

A pair of memory command signals are used to enable the microprocessor 30 (FIG. 7B) to communicate with the terminal 34 via the OCIA 31 and host communication interface 94. THe RD signal is transmitted along with the COM signal from flip-flop 418 (FIG. 24C) to the inverted inputs of an AND gate 460 (FIG. 25). The output signal RD COM (φ2 RD) of gate 460, allows the microprocessor to read data from the terminal which has been stored in a register in the OCIA. The WR signal is transmitted over the bus along with the COM signal from flip-flop 418 to the inverted inputs of an AND gate 462 (FIG. 25) to generate the WR COM signal (φ2 WR). This signal allows the microprocessor to send data to the terminal via the OCIA.

The READ signal (FIG. 24B) which controls the tristate driver 258 that regulates the SR bus is generated by microprocessor memory command signals PAR and CMNDφ4 which are transmitted from the flip-flop 418 (FIG. 24C) to the inputs of a NAND gate 464. The output of gate 464 is inverted by an inverting gate 466 whose output is connected to an inverted input of an OR gate 468. The other signals which are transmitted to the inverted inputs of gate 468 from the flip-flop 418 are SRD and COM. The output of gate 468 is inverted by an inverting gate 470 whose output signal READ, is coupled to an inverted input of a NAND gate 472. The other input of gate 472 contains the signal RD. The output of gate 472 is connected to the enabling input of tri-state driver 258 enabling data to be transmitted to the microprocessor. Both RD and READ must be low in order for data to travel from the SR data bus to the microprocessor.

The terminal 34 (FIG. 7B) is able to communicate with the microprocessor 30 via the OCIA 32 and host communication interface 94. Data which is to be sent from the microprocessor 30 to the terminal 32 enters a shift register 500 (FIG. 27) from the DB data bus lines DB0-DB7 inclusive. The microprocessor outputs a signal WR COM to the parallel load input of shift register 500 to allow the data to be loaded from the lines DB0-DB7. The signal WR COM is also transmitted to the master set input of a flip-flop 502. The output of flip-flop 502 is connected to an inverted input of an AND gate 504, with the signal WR COM appearing on the other inverted input. The output signal R DATA of gate 504 notifies the terminal 34 that there is data at the hose communication interface 94. The signal WR COM is also transmitted to the master clear input of a flip-flop 506 whose Q output is inverted by a gate 508. The output signal SENT of inverter 508, notifies the microprocessor 30 (FIG. 29) when the data has been clocked out of the host communication interface 94 to the terminal. When the WR COM signal goes high, it causes the SENT signal to go high, indicating that the data is ready to be sent.

The signal WR COM is also transmitted to the parallel load input of a shift register 510 (FIG. 27). This shift register counts the clocking pulses CLKIN, which clock the data from the host communication interface to the terminal. When the terminal is ready to receive the data, it transmits a series of pulses on the CLKIN line to shift registers 500 and 510 and flip-flops 502 and 506, via an inverter 512. The first eight CLK IN pulses clock the data from the DB data lines DB0-DB7 inclusive (FIG. 27) through shift register 500, flip-flop 502, and gate 504, over the R DATA line and through the OCIA to the terminal. The ninth CLKIN pulse causes the output of flip-flop 506 to go high, forcing the SENT signal to go low, indicating that all the data has been sent to the terminal.

When the terminal has data to send to the microprocessor, it sends the data to the host communication interface serially via the SDATA line (FIG. 28). The data is transmitted to shift registers 514 and 516 via an inverter 512. The terminal clocks the data into the shift registers with a CLK 0 signal, which is inverted by a gate 518 and is transmitted to shift registers 514, 516, and 520. When a byte of data has been clocked into shift registers 514 and 516, the output of shift register 520, which counts the CLK 0 clock pulses, goes high. This output signal R COMM is transmitted to a NOR gate 522 (FIG. 18) whose output is connected to the inverted input of NOR gate 247. The output signal SYMCAP of gate 247 goes low when R COMM goes high, signalling the microprocessor to read the SR data bus.

The signal R COMM is also transmitted to the tri-state buffer 253 (FIG. 19). When the microprocessor reads the SR data bus, by generating the SR RD signal, the R COMM signal is transferred to the SR7 of the SR data bus line via buffer 253. Since the R COMM signal is high, the microprocessor, seeing that line SR7 is high, knows that there is data from the terminal waiting to be read. The microprocessor now generates a RD COM signal, which enables the tri-state buffers 526 and 528 (FIG. 28), sending the terminal data onto the SR data bus and over to the microprocessor. Signal RD COM is also transmitted to an OR gate 530 via an inverter 532. Gate 530 causes a reset of shift register 520.

As shown in FIG. 29, the microprocessor 30 has four output lines available for the slot scanner which include line 534 for tone, line 536 for good light, line 538 for bad light, and line 540 for laser on. The tone signal controls an audible signal which sounds whenever a label is read. The good light signal lights a light indicating the label read was valid. The bad light signal lights a light indicating the label read was invalid, while the LASER ON signal controls the window shutter, which allows the laser beam to come out.

While the invention has been described in detail and with reference to a specific embodiment thereof, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that various changes and modifications can be made therein without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. Therefore, it is to be understood that the present invention is not to be limited beyond that as required by the appended claims.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification235/462.07, 235/437
International ClassificationG06K7/016, G06K7/00, G06K7/10
Cooperative ClassificationG06K7/0166
European ClassificationG06K7/016D