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Publication numberUS433549 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 5, 1890
Filing dateDec 17, 1889
Publication numberUS 433549 A, US 433549A, US-A-433549, US433549 A, US433549A
InventorsJames B. Soule
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Safety-alarm for elevator or other belts
US 433549 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

(No Model.) 4 Sheets-Sheet 1.

J.B.SOULE.

SAFETY ALARM FOR ELEVATOR OR OTHER BELTS. No. 433,549. Patented Aug. 5, 1890.

(No Model.) 4 Sheets-Sheet 2.

, J. B. .SOULE. SAFETY ALARM FOR ELEVATOR OR OTHER BELTS. No. 433,549. Patented Aug. 5, 1890.

Wflgesscs 1190013161 W JJrwU-B S ouk WWW I 32 4;, Wm f (M (No Model.) 4 Sheets-Sheet 3. J. B. SOULE.

SAFETY ALARM POE ELEVATOR OR OTHER BELTS.

Patented Aug. 5, 1890..

2 I I I z B q u a 9 9 Y x g \f L 0.. U k mo 2 s L w 5% S s E S 0 s R 1982 1316? James B SBuZe av -o (No Model.) 4 Sheets-Sheet 4.

J. B. SOULE.

SAFETY ALARM EOE ELEVATOR OR OTHER BELTS. No. 433,549. Patented Aug. 5, 1890.

THE NORRIS FETEnE c UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE,

JAMES B. SOULE, OF MINNEAPOLIS, ASSIGNOR OF ONE-FOURTH TO ROLLIN R. SMITH AND GUSSIE B. SMITH, BOTH OF DULUTH, MINNESOTA.

SAFETY-ALARM FO R ELEVATQ R OR QTH ER BELTS.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 433,549, dated August 5, 1890.

Application filed December 17,1889- Serial No. 334,039. (No model.)

To aZZ whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, JAMES B. SOULE, of Minneapolis, in the county of Hennepin and State of Minnesota, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Safety-Alarms for Elevator or other Belts; and I do hereby de 'clare that the following is a full, clear, and exact description thereof, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, and to the let ters of reference marked thereon, which form a part of this specification.

This invention relates to a novel safety device in the nature of an indicator or signaling apparatus for the purpose of indicating an accidental stoppage of elevator-belts, or belts used for transmitting, power.

The prompt indication of an accidental stoppage of a belt is highly important, especially in the case of elevator-belts, for the reason that the continued rotation of the drivingpulley in contact with the belt when the latter is held immovable is likely to create so much friction as to produce combustion, it being a fact well known to those familiar with grain -elevators, for example, that fires in such structures very often occur from this cause. It often happens that such an elevator-belt becomes choked by accumulation of grain therein, in which case the belt is likely to be stopped, when fire is soon produced by the friction of the drivingpnlley against the belt. By the use of an indicating device for calling attention of the operator to the stoppage of the belt at the instant the same occurs the machinery may be stopped, or other precaution taken, so as to avoid the disastrous results likely to arise from the stoppage of the belt. The same results are likely to ensue from the stoppage of belts other than those employed in elevators, and the use of a signaling device or indicator showing instantly the stoppage of any belt which rests in contact with a live or driving pulley maybe fully as advantageous as the use of a similar apparatus in connection with an elevator-belt. The invention consists, in its main or essential features, of an indicator or signaling device which is actuated by means independent of the parts driven by the belt or the belt itself,

and controlled by the movement of the belt and which is adapted to show, by giving an audible alarm or otherwise, when the belt ceases to move. In an apparatus embodying the main features of my invention the signaling device may be made in any one of a 5 5 great variety of different forn1sas, for instance, it may consist of a stea1n-whistle or bell, which Wi ll be sounded to give an audible alarm, or itmay be in the nature of an indicator, showing to the eye the stoppage of the belt. In cases where anumber of belts are under the control of one person the signaling device may have the form of an annunciator provided with a call-bell and arranged to indicate which of the several belts have stopped. The signaling device, furthermore, may be located adjacent to the belt for the observation of a person working near the same, or it may be located at a distant point in the same building or elsewhere. Furthermore, the alarm may betransmitted from thebelt to the signaling device ,eitherby mechanical means or by the use of an electric circuit. The spe= cific mechanism, through the medium of which the control of the indicating device by the movement of the belt is effected, may be constructed in a variety of forms. One device for the purpose, which I have employed in practice, and which for some reasons I prefer to any other herein suggested, consists of a revolving weight or weights arranged like those of the common steam-engine governor and driven by the belt, and connected with the signaling device in such manner as to hold said signaling device out of operation or inactive during the time that said weight is thrown or held outward by centrifugal action. Other devices may, however, be employed with the same general effectas, for instance, a blast of air created by a fan driven 9c from the moving belt may be employed tohold the signaling mechanism out of action,

or a shoe or block in frictional engagement with a pulley driven by the belt may be employed for the same purpose.

The invention consists in the matters hereinafter described, and pointed out in the appended claims.

In the accompanyingdrawings, illustrating my invention, Figure 1 is a face View of one too desirable form thereof. Fig, 2 is a sectional view taken upon line 2 2 of Fig. 1. Fig. 3 is a plan section of the same taken on line 3 3 of Fig. 1. Fig. 3 is a section taken on the lines 3 3 of Fig. 1. Fig. 4 is aview in front elevation of another form of apparatus embodying my invention. Figs. 5 and 6 are side and front elevations of an elevator casin g and belt provided with signaling apparatus embodying another form of my invention. Figs. 7 and 8 are diagrams illustrating other ways of carrying out the main features of the invention.

As shown in Figs. 1, 2, 3, and 3, A indicates one of the parts or legs of an elevatorcasing, and B a belt running therein and provided with a series of buckets B B. O is a smooth-faced wheel or pulley inserted through the hole or opening a in the casing A, and adapted to bear against the rear surface of the belt 13. Said pulley is attached to a shaft 0, which is mounted upon the elevator-casing or an adjacent stationary support in such manner that the said pulley O is movably sustained and is adapted to be held yieldingly against the belt.

The devices shown forsustainin g said shaft, as above described, are constructed as follows:

D is a metal frame or casting secured to the elevator-casing A adjacent to the hole a, and provided with ontwardly-projectin g parallel flanges cl (1, between which is pivoted a swinging frame D said frame being pivotally connected with the said casting at its outer end, or that remote from the pulley C, by means of pivots cl d. The shaft 0 has bearings d d at opposite ends of said frame D which frame is adapted to swing in and out between the flanges d d at its end nearest the pulley, thereby allowing the said pulley to be moved bodily toward and from the belt B.

D is a spring acting against the frame D and tending to thrust or hold the free end of said frame inwardly toward the elevator-casing, and to thereby press or hold the pulley C yieldingly against the elevator-belt. The said spring is shown as of leaf form, and secured at one end to the casing A, with its free end pressing against the frame D but a spring for the same purpose may be otherwise constructed or applied, as found convenient or desirable in practice. By the construction described the pulley is held with its periphery in contact with the belt, whereby continuous rotary motion is given to the pulley and its shaft during the time the belt is running, the pulley being held yieldingly'or by spring-pressure against the belt, in order to insure its contact with the same at all times. To the outerend of said shaft 0 are fixed two rigid arms a c, in the outer ends of which are pivoted two bell-crank levers E E,

j the outer and longer arms of which are pro- Vided with weights 6 e. The inner or shorter arms of said bell-crank levers are connected by means of links 6 c with a sliding sleeve or collar 6 mounted upon the shaft 0 and turning with the same. Said collar is provided with an annular groove 6 which is engaged by the forked end of a bell-crank lever F, which is pivotally supported upon the arm D of the casting D, hereinbefore described.

The upright or vertical arm of the bell crank lever F is engaged with the sleeve 6 and the horizontal arm thereof is provided with a weight F, which tends tomove the bell-crank lever in a direction to thrust the sleeves e outwardly upon the shaft, and to thereby throw the weights e e of the bellcrank levers inwardly or toward said shaft. The weight F is adjustable upon the arm of the bell-crank lever, and may be shifted to act with more or less leverage in accordance with the resistance to be overcome by the weight, or other considerations arising in practice. The said bell-crank lever F is connected by means of a wire f, or otherwise, with the indicator or signaling device of the apparatus. When the belt is running and the shaft 0 revolving, the weights 6 e are thrown outwardly by centrifugal force, thereby thrusting the sleeve 6 inwardly upon the shaft and moving the bell-crank lever F against the action of the weight thereon. As soon as the belt stops and the centrifugal action of the weights 6 e ceases, however, the weight F will depress the horizontal arm of the bellcrank lever F, and thereby throw the sleeve 6 outwardly and bring the said weights 0 6 toward the shaft. The signaling device employed in connection with a construction of this character is so arranged that it will remain inactive whenever the belt is running and the weight F is lifted; or it may be arranged to display at such time a signal indicating that the parts are operating properly. Such signaling device is so arranged, however, that as soon as the belt stops the weight F will act to move or permit the movement of the indicator or alarm device.

As shown in said Figs. 1, 2, 3, and 3, the signaling device is of the character of an alarm mechanism embracing a bell or gong, and said signaling device is actuated by a revolving shaft forming part of the mechanism which actuates the elevator-belt, so that the signaling device can come into operation only at times when the belt is moving. In other words, the signaling device is driven by one of the moving parts of the elevator mechanism, so that the customary stoppage of the elevator-belt at night, or when all of the other machinery in the elevator is stopped, will produce no alarm.

As shown in said Figs. 1, 2, 3, and 3, G is a revolving shaft forming part of the actuating mechanism by which the elevator-belt is operated. Attached to said shaft are two radial arms G G, having on their outer ends lugs or strikers g g, extending parallel with the shaft, and having straight transverse advance edges and beveled or inclined rear edges, as indicated at g g. II is an oscillating shaft arranged parallel with the shaft G and mounted in suitable stationary bearings 7b 7b. Attached to said shaft is a short rigid arm H, to which is pivoted a second arm H adapted to swing on a pivot h, arranged at right angles with the shaft H, so that said arm H is adapted to swing in a plane parallel with the axis of the shaft 11. The said arm I1 is so arranged that when swung upon its pivot 7L its outer or free end may be brought into the path of the strikers g g, or swung clear of the same. A spring H secured to the shaft II and to an adjacent stationary part, serves to throw said shaft in a direction opposite to that in which it will be turned or moved by the contact with the arm H of the strikers g g. \Vhen the said arm II is encountered by one of the strikers g, said arm is swung around against the action of the spring H until the striker passes the arm, when the arm is released and allowed to spring backward under the action of said spring. The backward movement of the arm H under the action of said spring H is limited by a suitable stationary stop 71, located in position to be encountered by the rigid arm H. It follows from this construction that when said arm H is located in position for engagement with the strikers g g said arm and the shaft H will be given a continuous oscillatory movement by the contact of the strikers therewith during the turning of the shaft. A spring I. is applied to the arm 11 for the purpose of throwing the said arm into position for engagement with the strikers g g. Such spring may be arranged in any convenient manner; but, as herein shown, it consists of a spirally coiled spring I, secured at one end to the said arm H and at its opposite end to a stationary piece or part 2 The said arm 11 is held out of the path of the revolving strikers g g against the action of the spring I by suitable connection with the actuating devices which are driven by the elevator-belt, and which are so arranged that said arm II will be held out of the path of said strikers during the time the elevatorbelt is running.

The rear edges of the strikers are inclined or beveled, as shown, so that in case the shaft- G is turned backwardly, either by accident or design, the arm II will be thrust sidewise by the said inclined edges, and the strikers will. pass the arm without injury.

In the devices shown in said Figs. 1, 2, 3, and 3 a wircf is attached to the said arm H and to a bell-crank lever f, to which latter the wire f leading to the bell-crank lever F is also connected. It follows from this construction that when the weights c e are thrown outwardly by the rotation of the shaft 0 the bell-crank lever F will be moved in a direction to draw the said arm H out of the path of the strikers g g, thereby allowing the said strikers to revolve freely without contact with the said arm. When the elevator-belt stops, however, the'lever F is moved by the weight F thereon, so as to thrust or draw inwardly the weights 6 e and allow the arm 11 to move or swing under the action of the spring I into the path of the strikers g g,

whereby the shaft II will be given a continu- 'or gong J, which is struck by a vibrating hammer J, attached directly to the oscillating shaft H.

The signalingdevice illustrated in said Figs. 1, 2, 3, and 3, and above described,I find to be highly advantageous in practice, because of its cheap and simple construction, and because it may be readily and quickly applied to any elevator-belt, and for the further reason that the alarm device is simple and positive in its action, and is always in readiness for operation when the machinery which drives the elevator-belt is running, while being incapable of action at times when the driving machinery is stopped and it is not needed. By reason of the advantages obtained by this construction the novel features thereof are herein claimed as part of my invention in addition to the main features common to all of the safety-signaling devices herein illustrated.

I will next describe that embodiment of my invention shown in Fig. 4. In said Fig. 4, A indicates the elevator leg or casing, B the belt, and B a bucket thereon. K is a transverse shaft journaled in bearings 7t, which are secured to the sides of the leg or casing. Said shaft K carries a friction wheel or pulley K, which bears against the inner side of the belt B, and is given a rotary motion thereby during the movement of the belt. On the outer end of the shaft K are located two rigid arms 70 7t, to the outer ends of which are pivoted bell-crank levers L L, the outer and longer arms of which carry weights Z Z. The inner or shorter arms of said bell-crank levers are connected by means of links Z l with a sliding collar M, sliding upon the shaft K. L indicates a bell-crank lever, which is pivoted to the casin g A below the shaft K, and the vertical arm of which is provided with a forked end engaging a groove m in the collar M. The horizontal arm of said bell-crank lever carries a weight N, preferably adjustable upon the said arm. A cord or wire 0 is attached to the end of the horizontal arm of the bell-crank lever, passes over rollers 0 0, and is connected with the valve-lever p of a whistle P, or with any other suitable signaling or alarm device.

When the belt of the elevator is in operation, it turns the shaft K and roller K,

thereby throwing outwardly the weights Z by centrifugal action and thrusting the collar M in the direction of the arrow, and lifting the horizontal arm of the bellcrank lever L against the actionof the weight N, and hold- ISO ing the alarm inactive, the same being thrown into position 7 for operation by means of a spring 19 acting against the lever 19. In case the elevator becomes clogged or the belt stops moving from. any accidental cause, the rotation of the shaft K will cease, the weight N will act to draw inwardly the weights Z Z, the weighted arm of the bell-crank lever L will descend, and the alarm will be sounded.

In Figs. 5 and 6 is illustrated still another embodiment of the main features of my invention. In this'instance A A indicate the elevatorlegs or casin g, and A an elevator-boot located'at the lower ends of said legs. Bis the elevator-belt, and B B the buckets thereon. I3 is the lower or boot pulley of the elevator. The upper or head pulley, which is driven by the actuating machinery of the elevator and gives motion to the belt, is not shown in the drawings, as it constitutes no part of the present invention. The elevator-boot A is shown as supported upon the lower ends of vertical adj usting-rods A A in the usual manner. Q Q are vertical tubes mounted to slide endwise upon the adj usti'ng-rods A A said tubes being attached to and adapted to support horizontal frame-bars q q. Said frame-bars are desirably secured adj ustably upon the said tubes by means of set-screws q q. Q Qare boxes or bearings mounted upon the tubes Q Q below the frame-bars q q and conveniently secured thereto by set-screws g g In said bearings or boxes Q Q is journaled a transverse shaft R, provided with friction-wheels R R, which rest upon or bear against the upper part of the periphery of the boot-pulley B S is avertical shaft mounted in bearings s s on the frame-bars q q, and provided at its lower end with a miter-gear s, intermeshing with a miter-gear 0" upon the shaft R. The upper ends of the shafts contain a device similar to a weight-governor and like that shown in Fig. 1, the same consisting of bell-crank levers S S, pivoted to rigid arms 3 s on the shaft and provided with weights 9 the short arms of said bell-crank levers being connected by links 8 with a sliding sleeve S upon the said shaft S. The endwise movement caused by the stoppage of the belt and the falling of the centrifugal weights 8 s is transmitted to a suitable alarm device or signaling apparatus. In the particular construction illustrated in said Fig. 5 a yoke s is engaged with an annular groove in the sliding collar S and to said yoke is connected a wire S which passes over suitable guide-rollers and is connected with the actuating-lever p of a steam-whistle P, which actuating-lever is held normally in position to hold the alarm inactive by the centrifugal action of the weights S S and is actuated by means of a spring 1) to open the valve. It is clear from this construction that when the elevator-belt is in motion the alarm device will be held inactive, and as soon as the belt is arrested from any cause the alarm mechanism is immediately thrown into action.

general results may, as far as the main fea tures of my invention are concerned, however, be obtained by the use of devices operating in an entirely different manner, and in the diagrams, Figs. 7 and 8, I have shown other forms in which the main features of my invention may be embodied in practice.

In Fig. 7, for instance, T is a shaft to which rotary motion is given from the traveling belt in any convenient manner-as, for instance, by means of a'friction-pulley (shown in dotted lines at t) placed in contact with the belt. (Indicated by dotted lines at 15'.) The shaft T is provided with fan-blades 19, which are surrounded by a fan-casing T, provided with an exit-passage T in a familiar manner. T is a flat disk or plate arranged opposite or in contact with the mouth of the passage T said plate being conveniently supported by means of an arm i attached to a rock-shaft T The plate T is held in position in contact with or adjacent to the mouth of the fan-casing by a suitable spring or weight adapted to yield under the action of the air-blast during the rotation of the shaft T, the said plate being connected with a suitable signaling device which is held out of action at all times except when the stoppage of the air-blast allows the plate to be drawn or thrown toward the fan-casing. As herein shown, the rock-shaft T is provided with an arm t, to which is connected a spring T which acts to throw the plate T toward the fan-casing. A wire 25 is attached to said arm, which wire may be connected with any suitable alarm or signaling device such, for instance, as the one illustrated in Figs. 1, 2, 3, and 3, or that shown in Fig. 4. It is entirely obvious that when the elevatorbelt is running the air-blast produced by the action of the fans will hold the plate T away from the mouth of the fan-casing against the action of the spring T and that as soon as the belt is stopped from any cause said spring T will be allowed to contract and will act upon the wire t and thereby actuate the alarm device, or, in case the same is self-acting, allow the same to act.

In Fig. Sis shown a simple form of signaling device embracing an electric-alarm apparatus. In this instance U is a revolving shaft actuated by the elevator-belt and provided with a pulley U, having a smooth peripheral surface. U is a brake-shoe resting on the surface of the pulley U and connected by means of a rod a with a vertical lever U The shoe U may be held in contact with the pulley by its own weight alone, or by means of a weight a, which may be attached to the rod to, if found necessary. The pivoted lever the contact-points together, so as to complete an electric circuit through the conductors V V and an electrical alarm device V When the pulley U is out of action, the spring U holds the lever U in position to complete the electric circuit in the manner described; but when the said pulley is rapidly turned by the movement of the belt the friction developed by the contact of the pulley with the shoe U will tend to drag or carry said shoe in the direction of the arrow, thereby moving the lever U against the action of the spring U and holding the contact-points apart. It follows from this construction that whenever the belt is running properly the con tact-points will be held separate and the electric circuit will be broken; but as soon as the belt stops the spring U will draw backwardly the shoe, so as to close the electric circuit and give the alarm.

I claim as my invention 1. The combination, with a traveling belt, an indicator or signaling device, and means actuating the latter independently of the belt or parts driven thereby, of a wheel or pulley driven by the belt and controlling the said alarm or signaling device, substantially as described.

2. The combination, with a traveling belt, an indicator or signaling device, and means actuating the latterindependently of the belt or parts driven thereby, of a spring or Weight applied to said alarm or signaling deviceand tending to throw the same into action, and mechanism actuated by the belt and acting in opposition to said spring or weight to hold the indicator or signaling device outof action during the movement of the belt, substantially as described.

3. The combination, with a traveling belt, an indicator or signaling device, and means actuating the latter independently of the belt or parts driven thereby, of a movably-supported revolving weight'or weights actuated by the belt and controlling said indicator or signaling device, substantially as described.

4. The combination, with a traveling belt, an indicator or signaling device, and means actuating the latter independently of the belt or parts driven thereby, of a wheel or pulley driven by the belt, a revolving movablysupported weight driven by the pulley, and an indicatoror signaling device controlled by said weight,substantially as described.

5. The combination, with a traveling belt, an indicator or signaling device, and means actuating the latter independently of the belt or parts driven thereby, of a wheel or pulley mounted in movable bearings and held yieldingly against the belt, and-an indicator or signaling device controlled by said pulley, sub stantially as described.

6. The combination, with'a traveling belt and actuating mechanism giving motioirto the same, of an indicator or signaling device operated by said actuating mechanism lndependently of the belt or parts driventhereby, said indicator or signaling device beingcontrolled by the belt, substantially as described.

7. The combination, with a traveling belt and actuating mechanism giving 1n-ot1on to the same, of an, indicator or signaling device operated by said actuating mechanism independently of the belt or parts driven thereby, a spring or weight applied to said alarm or signaling device and tending to throw the same into action, and mechanism actuatedby the belt and acting in opposition to said spr ng or weight to hold the indicator or signaling device out of action during the movement of the belt, substantially as described.

8. The combination, with a traveling belt, of a shaft driven by the same motor which actuates the belt, a signaling device provided with an actuating-arm, an arm or striker on the shaft adapted to act upon the actuatlngarm of the signaling device, said actuatingarm being movable into and out of the path of the striker, a spring tending to hold said actuating-arm in the path of the striker, and mechanism actuated by the belt acting to draw said actuating-arm out of the path of the striker against the action of the said spring, substantially as described.

9. The combination, with a traveling belt, of a pulley adapted for contact with the belt, a shaft supporting the pulley, a shaft which is driven by the same motor which actuates the belt, a signaling device provided with an actuating-arm, an arm or striker on the shaft adapted to act upon the actuating-arm of the signaling device, said actuating-arm being movable into and out of the path of the striker, a spring tending to hold said actuating-arm in the path of the striker, and mechanism actuated by the belt acting to draw said actuatingarm into the path of the striker against the action of the said spring, substantially as described.

10. The combination, with a traveling belt, of a wheel or pulley in contact with the same, a shaft supporting the pulley, a pivotally-supported frame affording bearings for the shaft, a spring acting against the frame to hold the pulley yieldingly in contact with the belt, and an indicator or signaling device controlled by said pulley, substantially as described.

11. The combination, with a traveling belt, of a'wheel or pulley in contact with the same, a shaft upon which said pulley is mounted, a pivotally-snpported frame affording bearings for the shaft, a spring acting upon the frame ICC) to hold the pulley in Contact with the belt, a my invention I affix my signature in presence centrifugally-acting Weight inovably susof two witnesses.

tained upon the said shaft, and an indicator or signaling device controlled by the inove- M ES SOULE' 5 ments of said Weight, substantially as de- Witnesses:

scribed. O. CLARENCE POOLE,

In testimony that I claim the foregoing as HARRY COBB KENNEDY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2769973 *Sep 23, 1953Nov 6, 1956Hugh Wood & Company LtdMeans for indicating faults on electrically driven conveyor systems
US4088222 *Feb 23, 1977May 9, 1978Hurt Frank KBelt switch
US4213743 *Apr 20, 1978Jul 22, 1980Mefcor, Inc.Pump assembly driven by endless conveyor
US4321018 *Jan 8, 1980Mar 23, 1982Hurt Frank KPump assembly driven by an endless conveyer
USRE30551 *Jul 16, 1979Mar 24, 1981Mefcor, Inc.Belt switch
USRE30570 *Jul 16, 1979Apr 7, 1981Mefcor, Inc.Belt switch
USRE31338 *Apr 17, 1981Aug 9, 1983MefcorPump assembly driven by endless conveyor
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationB65G43/04