Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS4364376 A
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 06/094,355
Publication dateDec 21, 1982
Filing dateDec 26, 1979
Priority dateDec 26, 1979
Publication number06094355, 094355, US 4364376 A, US 4364376A, US-A-4364376, US4364376 A, US4364376A
InventorsKeith E. Bigham
Original AssigneeBigham Keith E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and device for injecting a bolus of material into a body
US 4364376 A
Abstract
A radiation protective device for use in the injection of a bolus of radioactive material into a blood vessel is described. A bolus retainer is used having a bolus chamber sized to retain a desired bolus size. The chamber extends between front and rear ends of the bolus retainer which fits within a radiation shield. The front end is adapted to be connected to a hypodermic needle. The rear end is adapted for connection to a first syringe sized to precisely draw in the desired bolus size and a flushing syringe to advance the bolus into a blood vessel through the hypodermic needle. The bolus retainer has a valve located near its rear end to retain the bolus in the chamber when the flushing syringe is inserted to replace the first syringe. An improved technique for administering a radioactive bolus is described with substantially less radiation exposure and improved control and speed over the bolus injection.
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(3)
What is claimed is:
1. A device for use in the injection of a bolus of radioactive material in a blood vessel comprising:
a longitudinal bolus retainer having a bolus chamber extending between front and rear ends of the bolus retainer, a manually controlled valve located near the rear end of the bolus retainer to open and close said chamber near said rear end, the portion of the bolus chamber between the valve and the front end being capable of retaining a desired volume of said bolus material;
said bolus retainer being shaped to fit within a radioactive shield for radiation shielding thereby;
wherein said front end of the bolus retainer has an opening in unrestricted fluid communication with the bolus chamber to receive therein and discharge therefrom a bolus of said radioactive materials, said front end of the bolus retainer further being shaped to receive and retain a hypodermic needle assembly; and
wherein said rear end of the bolus retainer is shaped to operatively releasably receive a syringe.
2. A method for injecting a bolus of radioactive material into a body comprising the steps of
mounting a first syringe on a rear end of a longitudinal bolus retainer having a bolus chamber extending between front and rear ends of the bolus retainer and having a manually controlled valve located near said rear end to open or close the bolus chamber near said rear end;
placing a hypodermic needle at said front end;
placing a radiation shield over said bolus chamber;
opening said valve;
actuating said first syringe to enter through said front end a predetermined quantity of said bolus of radioactive material into the bolus chamber;
closing said valve;
replacing said syringe with a flushing syringe containing a flush solution;
advancing the flush solution from the flushing syringe to inject said bolus while said radiation shield remains in place.
3. The method for injecting a bolus as set forth in claim 3 and further including after said bolus of radioactive material has been entered into said through bore, the step of
actuating the first syringe to move said bolus and place in front thereof a predetermined quantity of flushing solution to effectively fill said bolus chamber.
Description
FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to a device and method for injecting a bolus of a material into a body. More specifically, this invention relates to a device and method for injecting a bolus of radioactive material in a nuclear medical procedure.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

In nuclear medicine procedures, a bolus of radioactive liquid is injected into a blood vessel. The progress or dispersal of the bolus is monitored by a radioactive sensing system with which one may then obtain an indication of heart or other vascular diseases.

Prior art techniques in the injection of a radioactive bolus typically involve apparatus as depicted in FIGS. 1 and 2. Thus, a syringe 10 is inserted into a vial 12 containing a radioactive liquid 14.

The amount or size of the bolus taken in by syringe 10 would depend upon the radioactive dosage needed for the particular procedure, the person in whose blood system the bolus is to be injected and such other factors as are generally well understood in the nuclear medicine field.

The filled or partially filled syringe 10 is then placed on an input port 16 of a three-way conventional valve 18 controlled by a manual control cock 20 and having another input port 22. An output port 24 is connected to a long flexible tube 26 which, at one end 28, is connected to a hypodermic needle 30 placed in a catheter inserted in a blood vessel 32. A flushing syringe 34 containing a supply of sterile saline solution is applied to input port 22.

To avoid the insertion of a significant amount of harmful air into blood vessel 32, the flushing syringe 34 is first actuated to fill flexible tube 26 with saline solution while the needle 30 is out of vessel 32. Thereupon, the valve 20 is actuated so that the radioactive bolus 36 in syringe 10 can be moved into tube 26 such as at 38 by emptying the syringe 10.

The valve 20 is then changed so that saline solution from flushing syringe 34 can be inserted into tube 26 behind bolus 36 and thus advance the bolus 36 for injection into blood vessel 32.

Since the bolus 36 is a radioactive substance, it is normal practice to protect the technician, physician or nurse who is administering the bolus against radiation with a lead shield 40 in the form of a cylinder and sized to fit over syringe 10. The shield, although affective when installed, is not able to protect the user throughout the procedure. Thus, after initial take-up of the bolus 36 in syringe 10 when the bolus is transferred to the flexible tube 26 at 38 the person applying the procedure is exposed to radiation. Though the radiation level for any one bolus is low, the administering of many tests can result in the accumulation of a radiation dosage which is extremely hazardous over an extended time period.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

With an apparatus and method in accordance with the invention, the radiation exposure to a person who administers a radioactive bolus can be effectively reduced. This is achieved by employing a bolus retainer which, at a front end, is adapted to be attached to a bolus intake and discharge nozzle such as a hypodermic needle and at a rear end to a syringe. A manual control valve is located near the rear end to open or close a bolus chamber which extends between the front and rear ends of the bolus retainer.

The initial take-up of a radioactive bolus is done by attaching an empty syringe to the rear end of the bolus retainer and a hypodermic needle to its front end. A bolus of suitable size is then drawn from a vial into the bolus retainer by actuating the syringe while a lead shield is employed around the bolus retainer. The amount of bolus drawn from the vial does not require visibility of the bolus retainer since the bolus taken in can be precisely determined from the graduations on the syringe.

Once a bolus is placed inside the bolus retainer, the first syringe is replaced with a flushing syringe containing a sterile supply of saline solution. The bolus can then be injected by actuating the flushing syringe to advance the saline solution through the bolus retainer and thus push the bolus out through the nozzle or hypodermic needle into a blood vessel while the lead shield remains in place.

Hence, with a bolus retainer in accordance with the invention, a lead shield can be employed throughout the entire procedure, thus minimizing radiation exposure hazards. Furthermore, a more precise control over the bolus injection procedure can be maintained since a flexible tube such as 26 is shown in FIG. 2 is not needed. The bolus injection system in accordance with the invention is able to provide improved bolus flow rate characteristics and also able to deliver a significantly greater percentage of the measured bolus to the patient.

It is, therefore, an object of the invention to provide a device and method for improving the injection of a bolus of a material into a blood vessel. It is a further object of the invention to provide an apparatus and method to reduce the radiation exposure hazard in the injection of a bolus of radioactive material in a nuclear medicine procedure.

These and other objects and advantages of the invention can be understood from the following detailed description of an embodiment as described in conjunction with the drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a side view in elevation of devices employed in the prior art technique of injecting a bolus of radioactive liquid in a blood vessel;

FIG. 2 is a side view in elevation and partial section of prior art devices employed in the injection of a bolus of radioactive material in a blood vessel;

FIG. 3 is a side view in elevation and partial section of an apparatus in accordance with the invention and used in a procedure to inject a bolus in a blood vessel;

FIG. 4 is a similar side view of the apparatus as shown in FIG. 3 but for a subsequent step in the procedure for injecting a bolus;

FIG. 5 is a side view in elevation and partial section of the apparatus in accordance with the invention during its use in the injection of the bolus in a blood vessel;

FIG. 6 is an enlarged partial sectional view of a portion of the view of FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is an enlarged partial sectional view of a portion of one bolus retainer in accordance with the invention; and

FIG. 8 is an enlarged sectional view of a portion of another bolus retainer in accordance with the invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

With reference to FIGS. 3 through 5, a device 50 for injecting a bolus in accordance with the invention is shown. A bolus retainer 52 is provided in the form of a hollow cylindrical body 53 having a bolus chamber 54 in the form of a through bore extending between front end 56 and rear end 58. A manual control valve 60 is mounted near rear end 58 to open or close chamber 54 from rear end 58.

The front end of bolus retainer 52 is shaped and sized to sealingly engage a nozzle in the form of a hypodermic needle 62. The latter could be permanently attached to bolus retainer 52, but preferably is separately obtained as a conventional separate sterile needle. Attachment of front end 56 to hypodermic needle 62 involves a conventional simple push-on engagement as is well known in the art.

The valve 60 is an integral part of bolus retainer 52 and provides two positions, open as shown in FIG. 3 with the valve handle 63 in the indicated position, or closed as shown in FIG. 4. Valve 60 is a conventional plastic valve as is commonly available. The entire bolus retainer 52 is formed of a plastic material and is packaged in a sterile container (not shown).

The rear end 58 is adapted for releasable attachment to the working end 64 of a conventional syringe 66 which is attached to end 58 in a conventional push-on pull-off manner. The rear end 58 is shown in a straight alignment with the bolus chamber 54, though it should be understood that other alignments, such as at a right angle, could be employed.

The body 53 in which the bolus 36 is retained is shaped to be enclosed by a radioactive shield 68 in the form of a hollow lead cylinder. The shield 68 may be frictionally held to the outer surface of body 53 while the bolus injection device 50 is used from the time the bolus is initially drawn from a vial 70 as shown in FIG. 3.

The use of lead shield 68 hides the body 53 from view while a bolus is drawn from vial 70 by syringe 66. The graduations such as at 72 on syringe 66, however, enable a precise determination of the amount of radioactive liquid drawn from vial 70.

After a bolus of radioactive liquid has been drawn from vial 70, valve 60 is closed and syringe 66 disengaged as shown in FIG. 4. A different flushing syringe such as 34 is then attached to end 58 of bolus retainer 52. Syringe 34 as previously described contains a sterile saline solution to advance the bolus in retainer 52 into blood vessel 32 as shown in FIG. 5.

The hypodermic needle 62 is placed in a cannula 74 previously inserted through an opening in the body to extend into blood vessel 32. The valve 60 is opened and, as shown in FIG. 6, a bolus 36 of radioactive material advanced into blood vessel 32 by saline solution 76.

Throughout a clinical study of a patient with whom the radioactive bolus injection procedure is used, the lead shield 68 provides effective radiation protection for the entire medical staff during the administration of the radioactive injection. Undesirable radiation exposure as might occur using the described prior art devices and procedure thus advantageously avoided.

In certain cases, the size of the desired bolus of material drawn into retainer 52 may be less than the volume of bolus chamber 54. Care must then be taken to avoid leaving an excessive amount of air in chamber 54. One procedure to avoid such air involves drawing in of a slug of saline solution in front of the bolus 36 to fill in most of the excess volume capacity of the bolus chamber while the first syringe 66 is still attached to end 58.

A preferred technique, however, employs a bolus retainer 52 whose bolus chamber 54 is sized commensurate with the desired amount of bolus material. One can in such case fill the bolus retainer 52 to full capacity, causing only a negligible amount of air from the volume enclosed between end 58 and valve 60. For this reason, a plurality of differently sized bolus retainers 52 are provided and this simplifies the bolus injection procedure.

FIGS. 7 and 8 show slightly different versions for a bolus retainer 52. In FIG. 7 a conventional valve 60 is shown frictionally attached to a separate cylindrically shaped body 53 having a flange 76 against which shield 68 is seated. In FIG. 8 the valve 60 is an integrally molded part of cylindrical bolus retaining body 53'.

Having thus explained devices and techniques accordance with the invention, its advantages can be appreciated. Variations may be made by one skilled in the art without departing from the scope of the following claims. For example, the bolus retainer may be used to inject other than radioactive materials.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1830453 *Oct 17, 1927Nov 3, 1931Eugene WassmerDevice for performing medical injections
US1930929 *May 12, 1931Oct 17, 1933Eisenberg Moses JoelHypodermic implement
US2390246 *Oct 18, 1940Dec 4, 1945Marvin L FolkmanSyringe
US3957033 *Aug 15, 1973May 18, 1976General Electric CompanyVentilation study system
US4073288 *Jun 21, 1976Feb 14, 1978Chapman Samuel LBlood sampling syringe
US4241728 *Nov 27, 1978Dec 30, 1980Stuart MirellMethod and apparatus for dispensing radioactive materials
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4471765 *Jun 25, 1982Sep 18, 1984The Massachusetts General HospitalApparatus for radiolabeling red blood cells
US4502488 *Jan 13, 1983Mar 5, 1985Allied CorporationInjection system
US5529189 *Aug 2, 1995Jun 25, 1996Daxor CorporationSyringe assembly for quantitative measurement of radioactive injectate and kit having same
US5616114 *Dec 8, 1994Apr 1, 1997Neocardia, Llc.Intravascular radiotherapy employing a liquid-suspended source
US5716317 *Dec 2, 1994Feb 10, 1998Nihon Medi-Physics Co., Ltd.Sheath for syringe barrel
US5906574 *Sep 19, 1997May 25, 1999Kan; William C.Apparatus for vacuum-assisted handling and loading of radioactive seeds and spacers into implant needles within an enclosed visible radiation shield for use in therapeutic radioactive seed implantation
US5961439 *May 6, 1998Oct 5, 1999United States Surgical CorporationDevice and method for radiation therapy
US6019718 *May 30, 1997Feb 1, 2000Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Apparatus for intravascular radioactive treatment
US6059713 *Mar 5, 1998May 9, 2000Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Catheter system having tubular radiation source with movable guide wire
US6059812 *Mar 6, 1998May 9, 2000Schneider (Usa) Inc.Self-expanding medical device for centering radioactive treatment sources in body vessels
US6071227 *Jan 27, 1997Jun 6, 2000Schneider (Europe) A.G.Medical appliances for the treatment of blood vessels by means of ionizing radiation
US6074338 *Jun 28, 1994Jun 13, 2000Schneider (Europe) A.G.Medical appliances for the treatment of blood vessels by means of ionizing radiation
US6099454 *Mar 6, 1997Aug 8, 2000Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Perfusion balloon and radioactive wire delivery system
US6106455 *Oct 21, 1998Aug 22, 2000Kan; William C.Radioactive seed vacuum pickup probe
US6110097 *Mar 6, 1997Aug 29, 2000Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Perfusion balloon catheter with radioactive source
US6117065 *Jun 24, 1998Sep 12, 2000Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Perfusion balloon catheter with radioactive source
US6146322 *Oct 30, 1996Nov 14, 2000Schneider (Europe) AgIrradiating filament and method of making same
US6162165 *Dec 2, 1998Dec 19, 2000Cook IncorporatedMedical radiation treatment device
US6203485Oct 7, 1999Mar 20, 2001Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Low attenuation guide wire for intravascular radiation delivery
US6231494Nov 17, 1997May 15, 2001Schneider (Europe) A.G.Medical device with radiation source
US6234951Jan 10, 1997May 22, 2001Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Intravascular radiation delivery system
US6258019Sep 8, 1999Jul 10, 2001Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Catheter for intraluminal treatment of a vessel segment with ionizing radiation
US6264596Nov 3, 1997Jul 24, 2001Meadox Medicals, Inc.In-situ radioactive medical device
US6267717Mar 31, 1998Jul 31, 2001Advanced Research & Technology InstituteApparatus and method for treating a body structure with radiation
US6267775Mar 6, 2000Jul 31, 2001Schneider (Usa) Inc.Self-expanding medical device for centering radioactive treatment sources in body vessels
US6302839Aug 6, 1999Oct 16, 2001Calmedica, LlcDevice and method for radiation therapy
US6302865Mar 13, 2000Oct 16, 2001Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Intravascular guidewire with perfusion lumen
US6352501Sep 23, 1999Mar 5, 2002Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Adjustable radiation source
US6398708Oct 28, 1998Jun 4, 2002Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Perfusion balloon and radioactive wire delivery system
US6398709Oct 19, 1999Jun 4, 2002Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Elongated member for intravascular delivery of radiation
US6413203Sep 16, 1998Jul 2, 2002Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Method and apparatus for positioning radioactive fluids within a body lumen
US6416457Mar 9, 2000Jul 9, 2002Scimed Life Systems, Inc.System and method for intravascular ionizing tandem radiation therapy
US6422989Nov 5, 1999Jul 23, 2002Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Method for intravascular radioactive treatment
US6514191Jan 25, 2000Feb 4, 2003Schneider (Europe) A.G.Medical appliances for the treatment of blood vessels by means of ionizing radiation
US6582352Jan 2, 2001Jun 24, 2003Schneider (Europe) A.G.Medical appliance for treatment by ionizing radiation
US6599230Mar 14, 2001Jul 29, 2003Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Intravascular radiation delivery system
US6616629Jun 14, 1999Sep 9, 2003Schneider (Europe) A.G.Medical appliance with centering balloon
US6676590Dec 8, 1997Jan 13, 2004Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Catheter system having tubular radiation source
US7025716 *Nov 19, 1999Apr 11, 2006Novoste CorporationIntraluminal radiation treatment system
EP0153878A2 *Mar 1, 1985Sep 4, 1985Eolas - The Irish Science and Technology AgencyAn injection device
EP0210875A2 *Aug 1, 1986Feb 4, 1987Theragenics CorporationApparatus for delivering insoluble material into a living body and method of use thereof
WO1996017654A1 *Dec 6, 1995Jun 13, 1996Omnitron Int IncIntravascular radiotherapy employing a liquid-suspended source
WO1997004708A1 *May 2, 1996Feb 13, 1997Daxor CorpSyringe assembly for quantitative measurement of radioactive injectate
WO1999029371A1 *Dec 2, 1998Jun 17, 1999Marc G AppleMedical radiation treatment device
WO1999049935A1 *Mar 30, 1999Oct 7, 1999Advanced Res & Tech InstApparatus and method for treating a body structure with radiation
Classifications
U.S. Classification600/5, 604/60, 604/507
International ClassificationA61M5/00, A61N5/10
Cooperative ClassificationA61M5/1785
European ClassificationA61M5/178R