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Publication numberUS4382035 A
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 06/247,131
Publication dateMay 3, 1983
Filing dateMar 24, 1981
Priority dateMar 26, 1980
Fee statusPaid
Also published asCA1168604A, CA1168604A1, DE3011738A1, EP0036583A2, EP0036583A3, EP0036583B1
Publication number06247131, 247131, US 4382035 A, US 4382035A, US-A-4382035, US4382035 A, US4382035A
InventorsHansjorg Eibl
Original AssigneeMax-Planck-Gesellschaft Zur Forderung Der Wissenschaften E.V.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Glycerol-3-phosphoric acid halogenoalkyl esters and processes for their preparation and further conversion
US 4382035 A
Abstract
New glycerol-3-phosphoric acid halogenoalkyl esters of the general formula I ##STR1## in which R denotes the radical R1 or an acyl radical --COR1, R1 denotes a straight-chain or branched, saturated or unsaturated alkyl group having 1 to 25 C atoms, R3 is a halogen atom, y is an integer from 2 to 12 and X.sup.⊕ denotes one equivalent of a monovalent or divalent cation, as intermediate products for the preparation of phospholipids (glycerolphosphatides), a process for their preparation, and a process for subjecting them to further conversion, are described.
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Claims(2)
I claim:
1. A glycerol-3-phosphoric acid halogenoalkyl ester of the formula ##STR5## wherein R3 is halogen, X⊕ is one equivalent of a monovalent or divalent cation, y is an integer from 2 to 12, and R is --R1 or --C(O)R1, wherein R1 is linear or branched saturated or unsaturated aliphatic hydrocarbon having 1 to 25 carbon atoms.
2. A compound as in claim 1 wherein R is a --C(O)R1 group of a natural fatty acid.
Description

The invention relates to new glycerol-3-phosphoric acid halogenoalkyl esters as intermediate products for the preparation of phospholipids (glycerophosphatides), a process for their preparation and a process for subjecting them to further conversion.

Phospholipids possess valuable pharmacological properties. By virtue of their physico-chemical properties (surface-active action), they have great influence on the permeability conditions in cell membranes. The properties of cell membranes can be influenced by administering phospholipids perorally or intraperitoneally to warm-blooded animals. Because of their surface-active, micelle-forming and emulsifying properties, the phospholipids are also used in the foodstuffs industry as substances which are harmless from the point of view of nutrition physiology, and are used as a feed additive and in the cosmetics industry. Because of their antioxidant action they are also used as auxiliaries in the leather and textile industries.

The isolation of single-substance phospholipids from natural tissues is not possible.

Their synthesis causes particular problems if the aim is to prepare glycerophosphatides in which the sn-glycerol-3-phosphoric acid is acylated with quite specific fatty acid radicals and, in particular, contains two different fatty acid radicals.

E. Cubero Robles et al. (Rec. Trav. Chim. 86, 1967, 762; Biochim. Biophys. Acta 187, 1969, 520) describe a synthesis of lecithins (phosphatidylcholines) containing mixed fatty acid radicals by acylating 1-palmitoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphocholine with fatty acid anhydrides in the presence of Na2 O. However, an exchange of the acyl groups takes place to a considerable extent in this process, as a result of which selectivity, that is to say the introduction entirely according to plan of specific acyl radicals in a specific position, is greatly reduced (see K. M. W. Keough, P. J. Davis, Biochemistry 18, 1979, 1453). A further disadvantage of this process is that migration of the phosphoric acid radical from the 3-position to the 2-position also takes place to a considerable extent during the acylation stage. In addition, the acylation can only be carried out after previously introducing amino protective groups and using a large excess of acid anhydride, as a result of which the process is complicated further and, particularly if high-priced fatty acids are used, becomes expensive.

The object of the present invention was, therefore, to provide a route for the preparation of glycerophosphatides which would avoid the disadvantages mentioned and would make it possible to prepare, in a simple and economic manner and with a high degree of selectivity, glycerophosphatides containing quite specific fatty acid radicals, particularly different fatty acid radicals, attached to specific positions.

This object is achieved by using as starting materials new glycerol-3-phosphoric acid halogenoalkyl esters of the general formula I, which have proved to be valuable intermediate products for the preparation of glycerophosphatides.

The invention relates, therefore, to glycerol-3-phosphoric acid halogenoalkyl esters of the general formula I ##STR2## in which R denotes the radical R1 or preferably an acyl radical --COR1, R1 denotes a straight-chain or branched, saturated or unsaturated alkyl group having 1 to 25 C atoms, R3 is a halogen atom, y is an integer from 2 to 12, preferably 2 to 6, and X⊕ denotes one equivalent of a monovalent or divalent cation and is preferably an alkali metal ion.

The invention also relates to a process for the preparation of glycerol-3-phosphoric acid halogenoalkyl esters of the general formula I, which comprises using as the starting material a compound of the formula II ##STR3## in which R, R3, y and X⊕ have the same meaning as in formula I and R' denotes an acyl radical --COR2 ' or a benzyl radical, R1 and R2 ' being different, or preferably identical, if R denotes an acyl radical --COR1, and R2 ' denotes a straight-chain or branched, saturated or unsaturated alkyl group having 1 to 25 C atoms, and, if R' represents an acyl radical, hydrolyzing this acyl radical in the presence of phospholipase A2, or, if R' denotes the benzyl radical, removing this radical by catalytic hydrogenolysis.

The invention also relates to a process for subjecting the glycerol-3-phosphoric acid halogenoalkyl esters, according to the invention, of the formula I to further processing to give glycerol-3-phosphoric acid derivatives of the general formula III, and to the combination of this process with the process according to the invention for the preparation of the compounds of the formula I. The process for the preparation of glycerol-3-phosphoric acid derivatives of the formula III ##STR4## in which R denotes the radical R1 or an acyl radical --COR1, R" is a hydrogen atom or an acyl radical --COR2, R1 and R2 being identical or different and denoting a straight-chain or branched alkyl group having 1 to 25 C atoms, R3 ' denotes a halogen atom or the group --NX1 ⊕X2 X3, X1, X2 and X3 are identical or different and denote hydrogen or a straight-chain or branched alkyl group having 1 to 6 C atoms, and preferably denote hydrogen or methyl, y is an integer from 2 to 12, preferably from 2 to 6, X⊕ denotes one equivalent of a monovalent or divalent cation and n is 0 to 1, R" being other than hydrogen if R3 ' denotes halogen and n being 0 if R3 ' denotes the group --NX1 ⊕X2 X3, comprises acylating, with an acid anhydride (R2 CO)2 O, a compound of the formula I in which R and X⊕ have the same meaning as in formula III and R3 corresponds to a halogen atom R3 ' of the formula III, and/or reacting this compound of the formula I with a compound NX1 X2 X3.

The radicals R1 and R2 are preferably different and are derived, in particular, from a natural fatty acid, such as, for example, stearic acid, palmitic acid, myristic acid, capric acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid, linolenic acid, arachidic acid or arachidonic acid.

A halogen atom R3 or R3 ' is fluorine, chlorine or iodine atom, but particularly a bromine atom.

A straight-chain or branched alkyl group X1, X2 or X3 which has 1 to 6 C atoms is, for example, ethyl, propyl, isopropyl, butyl, isobutyl, hexyl and the like, and is particularly the methyl group.

The conditions of the enzymatic hydrolysis (reaction medium, pH value, temperature and concentration of substrate) correspond to the conditions which are customary for such reactions, and can be chosen for a specific substrate, for example as in H. van den Bosch and L. L. M. van Deenen (Biochim. Biophys. Acta 106, 1965, 326). A pH value between 7.0 and 7.5 and a temperature of 3515 C., particularly the phase inversion temperature Tt 10 C. of the substrate, have proved particularly advantageous.

The conditions for the catalytic hydrogenolysis of the benzyl radical correspond to the customary conditions, taking account of the remaining structure of the molecule. In particular, the hydrogenolysis is carried out in an inert solvent, such as, for example, ethanol, in the presence of a palladium or Pt/Pd catalyst, preferably at room temperature and under normal pressure (see H. Eibl et al., Liebigs Ann. Chemie 738, 1970, 161).

The acylation of the compounds of the formula I by reaction with an anhydride of the formula (R2 CO)2 O is advantageously effected, particularly in order to achieve high yields, in the presence of perchloric acid and it is preferable to use an approx. 10% excess of anhydride. The reaction conditions can in this case be chosen in accordance with the known acylation of acylglyerol or diacylglycerol (see F. H. Mattson et al., J. Lipid Res. 5, 1964, 374). However, it is also possible to carry out the reaction in accordance with other acylation methods which are in themselves known, for example as described by Gupta et al., (Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 74, 1977, 4315).

If R2 denotes the radical of an unsaturated acid, in particular a polyunsaturated acid, it is advantageous to carry out the acylation reaction with the exclusion of oxygen, that is to say, for example, in vacuo, or particularly in an inert gas atmosphere, such as, for example, under nitrogen.

The amination of the compounds of the formula I wherein R3 denotes a halogen atom, preferably bromine, by reaction with an amine NX1 X2 X3 is effected in a manner which is in itself known (see H. Eibl and A. Nicksch, Chem. Phys. Lipids 22, 1978, 1; W. Diembeck and H. Eibl, Chem. Phys. Lipids 24, 1979, 237).

The starting compounds of the formula II can be obtained from the corresponding 1,2-substituted sn-glycerol compounds, for example by reaction with a halogenoalkylphosphoric acid dichloride (see Hirt and Berchthold, Pharm. Acta. Helv. 33, 1958, 349), or preferably by reaction with POCl3 in the presence of triethylamine and subsequently reacting the resulting glycerol-3-phosphoric acid dichloride with the corresponding halogenoalkanol (H. Eibl, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 75, 1978, 4074; H. Eibl and A. Nicksch, Chem. Phys. Lipids 22, 1978, 1; W. Diembeck and H. Eibl, Chem. Phys. Lipids 24, 1979, 237).

The acid anhydrides of the formula (R2 CO)2 O were prepared from the corresponding fatty acids and acetic anhydride (D. Holde and K. Rietz, Ber. 57, 1924, 99).

If the intermediate products, according to the invention, of the formula I are used as starting materials, the known disadvantages in the synthesis of glycerophosphatides, in particular the migration of the acyl radicals and/or of the phosphoric acid radical, are avoided. It has been found that the halogenoalkyl esters of an sn-glycerophosphoric acid of the formula I are very good starting materials for the preparation of glycerophosphatides:

The intermediate products of the general formula I are prepared by using the compounds of the general formula II as starting materials: it has been found that the compounds of the formula II in which R and R' are acyl radicals, are generally excellent substrates for phospholipase A2. This makes it possible to obtain the compounds of the formula I from the compounds II by enzymatic hydrolysis, without migration of the remaining radicals taking place. It has further been found that the same result is also achieved if the starting materials used are compounds II in which R' is a benzyl group, and if this radical is removed by catalytic hydrogenolysis. Which process stage is selected depends, above all, on the structure and accessibility of the starting materials II; in general, enzymatic hydrolysis using phospholipase A2 will be the preferred means when preparing the phospholipids of the formula I.

In order to subject the intermediate products of the formula I to further processing to give the compounds of the formula III in which R" is an acyl radical COR2, the resulting compounds I are acylated with an anhydride (R2 CO)2 O. Particularly good results are obtained in this reaction, particularly in regard to yield, if the acylation is carried out in the presence of perchloric acid. For this stage, too, it has been found, surprisingly, that, in fact, compounds of the formula I are particularly good starting materials for the preparation of glycerophosphatides, particularly lecithins or kephalins: if a 1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphocholine is acylated in the presence of perchloric acid, this results in a very incomplete reaction and in the formation of undesirable by-products; the yield of the desired diacyl derivative is correspondingly very low. If, however, the compounds of the formula I are acylated in the same manner, the desired diacyl derivatives are obtained in very good yields and with virtually no formation of undesirable by-products, and these diacyl derivatives can then be converted into the phosphatides in a manner which is in itself known by reaction with a suitable aminoalcohol, for example choline.

To summarize, it can therefore be stated that the intermediate products of the formula I make possible a very selective, simple and economical method of preparing glycerophosphatides, a method which is important, above all, for preparing (in a purity exceeding 98%) glycerophosphatides containing two different acyl radicals in specific positions. The yields for each stage of the process are very good; thus, for example, the overall yield starting from 1,2-substituted sn-glycerol compounds (the precursor of the starting compounds II) is 60 to 65% of theory).

The examples which follow are intended to illustrate the invention in greater detail without limiting it thereto.

The crude products from the animation reaction (formula III, R3 =N+ X1 X2 X3) were purified by column chromatography (silica gel 60, 0.2 to 0.5 mm, made by Merck, Darmstadt; migrating agent chloroform/methanol/25% strength aqueous ammonia in a volume ratio of 200/15/1 to 65/30/3).

The molar ratio P/acyl/vicinal diol was determined by the method of Eibl and Lands (Biochemistry 9, 1970, 423). Phosphate was determined by the method of Eibl and Lands (Anal. Biochem. 30, 1969, 51) and vicinal diol by periodate analysis by the method of Eibl and Lands (Anal. Biochem. 33, 1970, 58).

EXAMPLES 1,2-Dipalmitoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphoric acid bromoethyl ester

Phosphorus oxychloride (4.5 g, 0.03 mole) was cooled to 5 C. in a waterbath, while stirring. After adding triethylamine (3 g, 0.03 mole) in 30 ml of tetrahydrofuran, the stirring was continued and a solution of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycerol (11.4 g, 0.02 mole) in 70 ml of tetrahydrofuran was added dropwise over a period of 30 minutes. The completion of the reaction, that is to say complete conversion into the phosphoric acid dichloride, was determined by thin layer chromatography. The reaction mixture was allowed to stand for 30 minutes at 20 C. and the precipitated triethylamine hydrochloride was then filtered off. The solvents were evaporated off after adding 25 ml of toluene. The oily residue was dissolved in 40 ml of tetrahydrofuran at 20 C. A solution of triethylamine (5 g, 0.05 mole) in 20 ml of tetrahydrofuran was added, while stirring, and a solution of bromoethanol (3 g, 0.022 mole) in 60 ml of tetrahydrofuran was then added dropwise. The mixture was heated to 40 C. on a waterbath and the progress of the reaction was followed by means of thin layer chromatography. The reaction was complete after 60 minutes and the reaction mixture was cooled to 5 C. The phosphorus chloride was hydrolyzed with 14 ml of 4 M formic acid. Hydrolysis was complete after 30 minutes and water was added to the reaction mixture, which was extracted with 60 ml of hexane. 30 ml of toluene were added to the upper phase, which contained the reaction product, and this phase was then evaporated to dryness. The residue was dissolved in 100 ml of diisopropyl ether and the solution was extracted by shaking with a 0.5 molar solution of sodium carbonate (100 ml); 100 ml of methanol were added to improve the phase separation. The upper phase contained the 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glyerol-3-phosphoric acid bromoethyl ester. After adding 300 ml of acetone, the white precipitate was isolated and employed for hydrolysis with phospholipase A2.

Yield of crude 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphoric acid bromoethyl ester (as the sodium salt): 13.7 g (86% of theory, relative to 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycerol). A small quantity of the resulting product was purified by chromatography for elementary analysis.

C37 H71 BrNaO8 P.1H2 O Molecular weight: 795.87 calculated: C 55.84, H 9.25, Br 10.04, P 3.89, found: C 55.69, H 9.11, Br 9.54, P 3.87.

1-Palmitoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphoric acid bromoethyl ester

1,2-Dipalmitoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphoric acid bromoethyl ester (8.0 g, 0.01 mole) was suspended in a mixture of 300 ml of diethyl ether and 300 ml of distilled water containing CaCl2 2H2 O (2.3 g, 0.016 mole). 285 ml of Palitzsch Buffer A (S. Palitzsch. Biochem. Z. 70, 1915, 333) and 15 ml of Palitzsch Buffer B were added, giving a pH value of 7.5 in the resulting emulsion. 10 mg of phospholipase A2 (from pig pancreas; supplied by Bohringer, Mannheim) were added and the mixture was stirred at 35 C. for approx. 60 minutes. After this time, the starting material had been converted completely into 1-palmitoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphoric acid bromoethyl ester and fatty acid. The reaction mixture separated into two phases. 100 ml of toluene were added to the upper layer, which contained the reaction product (determined by thin layer chromatography), and the mixture was evaporated to dryness. After adding 100 ml of acetone, the residue formed white crystals. These were filtered off and rinsed with 20 ml of acetone. The filtrate contained the fatty acid; the precipitate was pure according to thin layer chromatography. The yield of 1-palmitoyl-sn-glyercol-3-phosphoric acid bromoethyl ester was 5.5 g (93% of theory, relative to the intermediate product.

1-Palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphoric acid bromoethyl ester

1-Palmitoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphoric acid bromoethyl ester (2.6 g, 5 mmoles) was dissolved in a mixture of 5 ml of chloroform, 6 ml of methanol and 5 ml of 4 M formic acid, in order to obtain the free acid. The lower phase contained the product and was diluted with 3 ml of toluene. The solvent was removed by evaporation and the residue was dissolved in 40 ml of trichloroethylene, after which oleic anhydride (3 g, 5.5 mmoles) was added. 0.15 ml of 70% strength aqueous perchloric acid was mixed with the solution, while stirring carefully. The acylation was complete after 30 seconds (demonstrated by thin layer chromatography) and the reaction mixture was neutralized by adding 1 g of sodium bicarbonate. The trichloroethylene phase was mixed with 10 ml of toluene and evaporated to dryness. The residue was dissolved in 30 ml of hexane/diisopropyl ether (in a 9/1 ratio by volume) and was purified over silica gel (100 g, 0.2 to 0.5 mm, supplied by Merck, Darmstadt). The fatty acids were removed by elution with diisopropyl ether and the reaction product was eluted with chloroform/methanol/water (in a ratio by volume of 65/30/3). Yield of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphoric acid bromoethyl ester: 3.4 g (83% of theory) relative to the intermediate product).

Animation of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphoric acid bromoethyl ester

Animation of using compounds of the formula NX1 X2 X3 was carried out by the method of W. Diembeck and H. Eibl (Chem. Phys. Lipids 24, 1979, 237). The yields of pure products were 90 to 95%, relative, to the bromoalkyl ester. The analytical data of the phospholipids synthesized are given in Table 1 (compounds 1 and 2).

If the bromoethanol (y=2) is replaced in the above examples by another halogenoalkanol and if the oleic anhydride is replaced by another fatty acid anhydride, the compounds 3 to 10 Table 1 are obtained in an analogous manner.

                                  TABLE 1__________________________________________________________________________Fatty acid radical  Formula                      C  H  N  P   in the 1-position               (molecular                      calculatedNo.   in the 2-position       y Amine weight)                      found__________________________________________________________________________1  Palmitic 2 N(CH3)3               C42 H84 NO9 P                      64.83                         10.88                            1.80                               3.98   Oleic            (778.08)                      64.11                         10.79                            1.69                               3.822  Palmitic 2 NH3               C46 H92 NO9 P                      66.23                         11.12                            1.68                               3.71   Oleic            (717.98)                      64.86                         10.61                            2.01                               4.203  Palmitic 6 N(CH3)3               C46 H92 NO9 P                      66.23                         11.12                            1.68                               3.71   Oleic            (834.23)                      65.98                         11.01                            1.72                               3.684  Palmitic 6 NH3               C43 H84 NO8 P                      66.72                         10.94                            1.81                               4.00   Oleic            (774.13)                      66.51                         10.83                            1.85                               3.895  Palmitic 2 N(CH3)3               C36 H74 NO9 P                      62.13                         10.72                            2.01                               4.45   Lauric           (695.94)                      61.94                         10.69                            2.04                               4.216  Palmitic 2 NH(CH3)2               C35 H70 NO8 P                      63.32                         10.63                            2.11                               4.66   Lauric           (687.91)                      63.21                         10.56                            2.21                               4.737  Palmitic 2 NH2 (CH3)               C34 H68 NO8 P                      62.83                         10.55                            2.16                               4.77   Lauric           (661.88)                      62.47                         10.41                            2.04                               4.538  Palmitic 2 NH3               C33 H66 NO8 P                      62.33                         10.46                            2.20                               4.87   Lauric           (635.84)                      61.85                         10.29                            2.02                               4.719  Palmitic 2 N(CH3)3               C44 H90 NO9 P                      64.39                         11.23                            1.73                               3.83   Arachidic        (808.19)                      65.05                         11.07                            1.64                               3.9110 Palmitic 2 NH3               C41 H82 NO8 P                      65.83                         11.05                            1.87                               4.14   Arachidic        (748.09)                      65.64                         10.96                            1.72                               4.07__________________________________________________________________________
Patent Citations
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Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *Chem. Abstr. 67, 29325d (1967).
2 *Chem. Abstr. 93, 16852n (1980).
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US4778912 *Nov 21, 1986Oct 18, 1988Takeda Chemical Industries, Ltd.Phospholipid derivatives
US5441876 *Jul 30, 1993Aug 15, 1995The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyProcess for the preparation of headgroup-modified phospholipids using phosphatidylhydroxyalkanols as intermediates
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Classifications
U.S. Classification554/79, 987/233, 987/224, 558/177
International ClassificationC12P9/00, C07F9/10, C12P7/20, C07F9/09
Cooperative ClassificationC07F9/10, C07F9/091
European ClassificationC07F9/09A1, C07F9/10
Legal Events
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Dec 27, 1982ASAssignment
Owner name: MAX-PLANCK GESELLSCHAFT ZUR FORDERUNG DER WISSENSC
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