Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS4383920 A
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 06/268,382
Publication dateMay 17, 1983
Filing dateMay 29, 1981
Priority dateMay 29, 1981
Fee statusPaid
Also published asCA1169167A, CA1169167A1, EP0079933A1, EP0079933A4, WO1982004197A1
Publication number06268382, 268382, US 4383920 A, US 4383920A, US-A-4383920, US4383920 A, US4383920A
InventorsRichard S. Muller, Richard C. Dickerson
Original AssigneeEcolochem, Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Mobile fluid purification system
US 4383920 A
Abstract
A mobile system for purifying liquids, such as water, including a truck trailer in which multiple purification treatment tanks are mounted. The system includes an inlet, an outlet, conductivity measuring equipment for monitoring the quality of the purified liquid, and specially designed liquid conduits and valves which permit the treatment tanks to be operated in series, in parallel, or in series/parallel. The treatment tanks can be filled with any desired purification material. The trailer is enclosed and heated to protect the system from cold temperatures.
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(18)
What is claimed is:
1. A mobile liquid purification system comprising:
(1) a vehicle;
(2) a set of three or more liquid purification treatment tanks mounted in said vehicle, each of said treatment tanks containing a liquid purification treatment material, each of said treatment tanks further having a liquid inlet, a liquid outlet, a purification treatment material inlet, and a purification treatment material outlet;
(3) a system inlet means adapted to be connected to a source of raw liquid to be purified;
(4) a system outlet means for delivering purified liquid;
(5) liquid conduit and valve means for conveying said raw liquid from said system inlet means to said treatment tanks and between said treatment tanks and from said treatment tanks to said system outlet means, said conduit and valves means being selectively connected to said treatment tanks whereby said treatment tanks are capable of being operated: (a) in series, (b) in parallel, (c) in series/parallel mode, and, (d) in parallel/series mode; and,
(6) measuring means for monitoring the quality of the purified liquid output.
2. The mobile liquid purification system of claim 1 wherein said vehicle is enclosed and has an interior heating means.
3. The mobile liquid purification system of claim 1 wherein said liquid is water.
4. The mobile liquid purification system of claim 1 wherein said liquid purification treatment materials are selected from the group consisting of anion exchange resins, cation exchange resins, mixed anion and cation exchange resins, sand, activated carbon and scavenging resins.
5. The mobile liquid purification system of claim 1 wherein said system includes an inlet strainer, a flow meter, a water temperature alarm, a pressure reducing valve, an air temperature alarm, an air release valve, and an outlet strainer.
6. The mobile liquid purification system of claim 1 wherein each of said treatment tanks further includes a regeneration liquid inlet and a regeneration liquid outlet, whereby the purification treatment material in each of said treatment tanks is capable of being regenerated in situ.
7. A mobile liquid purification system comprising:
(1) a vehicle;
(2) a set of three or more liquid purification treatment tanks mounted in an adjacent upright position in said vehicle, each of said treatment tanks containing a liquid purification treatment material, each of said tanks further having a liquid inlet, a liquid outlet, a purification treatment material inlet, and a purification treatment material outlet;
(3) a system inlet means adapted to be connected to a source of raw liquid to be purified;
(4) a system outlet means for delivery purified liquid;
(5) a first liquid conduit means for conveying said raw liquid, said first liquid conduit means being connected to said system inlet means and to the first of said treatment tanks;
(6) a second liquid conduit means, said second liquid conduit means being selectively connected between: (a) said first liquid conduit means and the liquid inlet of the second of said treatment tanks whereby said first treatment tank and said second treatment tank are capable of being operated in parallel; and, (b) the liquid outlet of said first treatment tank and the liquid inlet of said second treatment tank whereby said first treatment tank and said second treatment tank are capable of being operated in series;
(7) a third liquid conduit means, said third liquid conduit means being selectively connected between: (a) said second liquid conduit means and the liquid inlet of the third of said treatment tanks whereby said second treatment tank and said third treatment tank are capable of being operated in parallel; and, (b) the liquid outlet of said second treatment tank and the liquid inlet of the third of said treatment tanks whereby said second treatment tank and said third treatment tank are capable of being operated in series;
(8) a fourth liquid conduit means connecting the liquid outlet of said third treatment tank and said system outlet means; and,
(9) measuring means for monitoring the quality of the purified liquid.
8. The mobile liquid purification system of claim 7 wherein said vehicle is enclosed and has an interior heating means.
9. The mobile liquid purification system of claim 7 wherein said liquid is water.
10. The mobile liquid purification system of claim 7 wherein said liquid purification treatment materials are selected from the group consisting of anion exchange resins, cation exchange resins, mixed anion and cation exchange resins, sand, activated carbon, and scavenging resins.
11. The mobile liquid purification system of claim 7 wherein said system includes an inlet strainer, a flow meter, a water temperature alarm, a pressure reducing valve, an air temperature alarm, an air release valve, and an outlet strainer.
12. The mobile liquid purification system of claim 7 wherein each of said treatment tanks further includes a regeneration liquid inlet and a regeneration liquid outlet, whereby the purification treatment material in each of said treatment tanks is capable of being regenerated in situ.
13. A mobile liquid purification system comprising:
(1) a vehicle;
(2) a set of six liquid purification treatment tanks mounted in an adjacent upright position in said vehicle, each of said treatment tanks containing a liquid purification treatment material, each of said tanks further having a liquid inlet, a liquid outlet, a purification treatment material inlet, and a purification treatment material outlet;
(3) a system inlet means adapted to be connected to a source of raw liquid to be purified;
(4) a system outlet means for delivering purified liquid;
(5) a first liquid conduit means for conveying said raw liquid, said first liquid conduit means being connected to said system inlet means and to the first of said treatment tanks;
(6) a second liquid conduit means, said second liquid conduit means being selectively connected between: (a) said first liquid conduit means and the liquid inlet of the second of said treatment tanks whereby said first treatment tank and said second treatment tank are capable of being operated in parallel; and, (b) the liquid outlet of said first treatment tank and the liquid inlet of said second treatment tank whereby said first treatment tank and said second treatment tank are capable of being operated in series;
(7) a third liquid conduit means, said third liquid conduit means being selectively connected between: (a) said second liquid conduit means and the liquid inlet of the third of said treatment tanks whereby said second treatment tank and said third treatment tank are capable of being operated in parallel; and, (b) the liquid outlet of said second treatment tank and the liquid inlet of the third of said treatment tanks whereby said second treatment tank and said third treatment tank are capable of being operated in series;
(8) a fourth liquid conduit means, said fourth liquid conduit means being selectively connected between: (a) said third liquid conduit means and the liquid inlet of the fourth of said treatment tanks whereby said third treatment tank and said fourth treatment tank are capable of being operated in parallel; and, (b) the liquid outlet of said third treatment tank and the liquid inlet of the fourth of said treatment tanks whereby said third treatment tank and said fourth treatment tank are capable of being operated in series;
(9) a fifth liquid conduit means, said fifth liquid conduit means being selectively connected between: (a) said fourth liquid conduit means and the liquid inlet of the fifth of said treatment tanks whereby said fourth treatment tank and said fifth treatment tank are capable of being operated in parallel; and, (b) the liquid outlet of said fourth treatment tank and the liquid inlet of the fifth of said treatment tanks whereby said fourth treatment tank and said fifth treatment tank are capable of being operated in series;
(10) a sixth liquid conduit means, said sixth liquid conduit means being selectively connected between: (a) said fifth liquid conduit means and the liquid inlet of the sixth of said treatment tanks whereby said fifth treatment tank and said sixth treatment tank are capable of being operated in parallel; and, (b) the liquid outlet of said fifth treatment tank and the liquid inlet of the sixth of said treatment tanks whereby said fifth treatment tank and said sixth treatment tank are capable of being operated in series;
(11) a seventh liquid conduit means connecting the liquid outlet of said sixth treatment tank and said system outlet means; and,
(12) measuring means for monitoring the quality of the purified liquid.
14. The mobile liquid purification system of claim 13 wherein said vehicle is enclosed and has an interior heating means.
15. The mobile liquid purification system of claim 13 wherein said liquid is water.
16. The mobile liquid purification system of claim 13 wherein said liquid purification treatment materials are selected from the group consisting of anion exchange resins, cation exchange resins, mixed anion and cation exchange resins, sand, activated carbon, and scavenging resins.
17. The mobile liquid purification system of claim 13 wherein said system includes an inlet strainer, a flow meter, a water temperature alarm, a pressure reducing valve, an air temperature alarm, an air release valve, and an outlet strainer.
18. The mobile liquid purification system of claim 13 wherein each of said treatment tanks further includes a regeneration liquid inlet and a regeneration liquid outlet, whereby the purification treatment material in each of said treatment tanks is capable of being regenerated in situ.
Description
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The invention is in the field of liquid purification or separation apparatus. More particularly, the invention relates to a mobile liquid purification system.

2. Description of the Prior Art

The prior art includes U.S. Pat. No. 4,049,548 to Dickerson which discloses a mobile demineralizer for water treatment having two successive banks of mixed-bed ion exchange resin cylinders which produce extremely high quality water.

Experience has shown that the mixed-bed ion exchange resin cylinders used in the mobile demineralizer of that earlier patent produce a water quality that may be much higher in quality than many industrial water purification customers require, thus creating an economic and chemical inefficiency. Furthermore, the ion exchange resin cylinders used in that invention cannot be regenerated in situ, but must be disconnected and removed from the mobile demineralizer and transported to a regeneration station.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention provides a mobile liquid purification system with a multiplicity of purification treatment tanks which can be connected in parallel, in series, or in parallel/series configuration. Each of the treatment tanks can be filled with one or more purification treatment materials selected from among the multiplicity of available purification materials. Accordingly, the inventive system can be precisely tailored to the needs of each industrial liquid purification customer. The invention has the capability of removing the purification materials from the treatment tanks without removing the tanks from the mobile unit, and it also has the further capability of regenerating the purification materials in situ without removing them from the treatment tanks if desired.

The invention is a mobile liquid purification system including (1) a vehicle; (2) a set of three or more liquid purification treatment tanks mounted in the vehicle, each of the treatment tanks containing a liquid purification treatment material, and each of the treatment tanks having a liquid inlet, a liquid outlet, a purification treatment material inlet, and a purification treatment material outlet; (3) a system inlet to be connected to a source of raw liquid to be purified; (4) a system outlet for delivering purified liquid; (5) liquid conduits and valves for conveying the raw liquid from the system inlet to the treatment tanks, between the treatment tanks, and from the treatment tanks to the system outlet, the conduits and valves being selectively connected to the treatment tanks so that the treatment tanks can operate in a series mode, in a parallel mode, or in a series/parallel mode; and, (6) measuring apparatus which monitors the quality of the purified liquid output.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING

The drawing is a perspective view of a mobile water purification system constructed in accordance with the principles of the invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

The mobile liquid purification system of the present invention is capable of being precisely tailored to the needs of the particular industrial liquid purification job by virtue of the fact that the system can be configured in a multitude of operating modes. A preliminary chemical analysis of the raw liquid is performed and on the basis of that analysis the mobile system is configured in such a way as to satisfy the job requirements. Quality control is assured through the supervision of field operators who preferably remain with the mobile system when it is in service.

The drawing and the following description illustrate a specific working example of the invention in the field of water purification. The drawing shows a standard truck trailer 12 in which six water purification treatment tanks 1-6 are permanently mounted. The trailer 12 is eight feet wide and forty-three feet long. Each of the treatment tanks is six feet in diameter, has a shell height of five feet, and will hold up to one hundred and fifteen cubic feet of purification treatment material.

Raw water is received from the customer's source via 21/2" water inlet connections 14. Access to these connections is through an access door in the side of the trailer. The 21/2" hose nipples are attached to, and are a part of, the outside body of inlet strainer 16. The purpose of this strainer is to prevent foreign bodies from entering the system. After leaving the strainer, the flow is measured in an indicating and recording flow meter 18. From here, the raw water continues through a pressure reducing valve 20. This valve reduces the incoming pressure to that suitable for this system, and will prevent overloads in the system from occurring. A rupture disc 22 is mounted in this inlet piping to protect the system from pressure overload.

The water is then carried the length of the trailer by hose 24, which is preferably 5" rubber hose to permit flexing when the trailer travels over uneven road surfaces. Before reaching the first tank, any entrapped air is released through air release valve 26. This valve serves a dual purpose in that it admits air during the draining of the system to prevent a vacuum from being imposed in the system and it removes air from the system during normal operation.

For the purpose of processing the raw water, six rubber-lined tanks 1-6 are included within the trailer. The number of tanks is not critical, and can be three or more. Six tanks provides an efficient and workable system. The operation of the tanks can be configured in a multitude of ways which is one of the features of this inventive system. Each tank is essentially identical from a mechanical point of view, but to simplify the drawing, all of the valves are not shown in each tank.

In the working example shown in the drawing, the raw water delivered by hose 24 and 24A enters at the top of tanks 1 and 2, which thus operate in parallel, through water inlet valves 28A and 28B, respectively. Incoming water is prevented from continuing to an upper hose 24B by a blind flange 36. The tanks 1 and 2 contain, in this example, commercially-available cation exchange resins which remove cations such as calcium, magnesium, sodium, and potassium ions from the raw water. The water passes down through the cation resin in tanks 1 and 2 in parallel and goes through water outlet valves 30A and 30B, respectively, and into a connecting hose 25A. The water then is diverted up through a crossover hose 32, since the valve 34 is closed.

The tanks 3, 4, and 5 operate in parallel through the use of a crossover hose 32 and the connecting hoses 24B, 24C, and 24D. The tanks 3, 4, and 5 contain, in this example, commercially-available anion exchange resins which remove anions such as sulfate, chloride, bicarbonate, and carbonate ions from the water. The top hoses 24B, 24C, and 24D function as the inlet header to the tanks 3, 4, and 5. The incoming water is prevented from continuing to top hose 24E by a blind flange 36A. Water delivered by hoses 24B, 24C, and 24D enters at the top of the tanks 3, 4, and 5 operating in parallel through inlet valves 28C, 28D, and 28E, respectively. Water passes down through the anion exchange resin in these tanks and exits through outlet valves 30C, 30D, and 30E, respectively.

As shown in the drawing, the outlet valves 30C, 30D, and 30E of tanks 3, 4, and 5 are connected to the lower connecting hoses 25C and 25D. The water is then diverted vertically through a crossover hose 40 by having the valve 42 closed. This diverts the flow into tank 6, which in this example is a mixed-bed ion exchange resin (demineralizer), the flow entering at the top of tank 6 through inlet valve 28F, passing down through the bed inside tank 6, and leaving through the outlet valve as in the previous tanks. At this point, the entire flow from the system goes through the tank 6 and is measured for its quality by a conductivity cell 44. Following this, the flow passes through a resin trap 46, which contains a stainless steel mesh strainer and basket. The purpose of the resin trap 46 is to catch any resin which might leave the system and prevent it from getting into the customer's water system. The purified water leaves the trailer through 21/2" water outlet connections 48.

Because of the susceptibility of the system to high or low air temperatures, and to protect the equipment, a high temperature alarm 50 and a low temperature alarm 52 are also provided. The output from the conductivity cell 44 is measured and recorded on the conductivity monitor 54. This monitor has adjustable set points, and should the quality of the water being delivered be below the set point, then the conductivity monitor provides an electrical signal to pressure reducing valve 20, which will cause it to close. At the same time, the system can be arranged to sound an alarm to alert the operator that the water quality is below the set point, and has been shut off. To protect the system from high water temperatures, a temperature measuring and alarm system 56 will sound an alarm and can be connected (if desired) to close inlet 14.

When the tanks are to be regenerated by removing the resins from the system, connections are made to a resin outlet valve 64 in each tank and sluicing water may be added to the tank via regeneration inlet valve 58, vent valve 62, or spray valve 66, depending upon the particular desired result. Should additional sluicing water be required, or should a stoppage in the resin outlet be encountered, additional water may be injected via a valve 68. This same valve will also provide additional sluicing water in the resin out line, if necessary. Spray valve 66 is connected internally with a spray water system which is used in removing the resin from the tanks. Regenerated resin would be replaced in each tank through a resin inlet valve 65 located at the top of each tank.

The foregoing example refers to operation in the mode in which the ion exchange resins are removed from the tanks and regenerated outside of the trailer. Should it be necessary or desirable to regenerate the resins in the tanks, the necessary regenerants are injected through regeneration inlet valve 58 in each tank, and removed from each tank through regeneration outlet valve 60 in each tank. These valves, when connected through the proper sources, and when opened, will allow regeneration chemicals to be injected into and then removed from the tanks. During this regeneration operation, water inlet valves 28A-F and water outlet valves 30A-F must be closed to isolate each tank from the system. A vent valve 62 is provided in each tank to relieve air which may be in the tanks when they are filled, and to add air when draining. It is also a way of adding additional water to the tanks.

The configuration described in the foregoing example represents the use of the system when tanks 1 and 2 are used in parallel as cation exchangers, tanks 3, 4, and 5 are used in parallel as anion exchangers, and tank 6 is used as a mixed-bed cation and anion exchanger. One of the features of this system is complete flexibility of use. For example, it may be desirable to have three cation tanks and three anion tanks, and no mixed-bed tanks. In such a configuration, crossover hose 32, valve 34, and blind flange 36 would be removed from between tanks 2 and 3 and these components would be placed between tanks 3 and 4. At the same time, blind flange 36A, located between tanks 5 and 6, would be removed. This would then put tanks 1, 2, and 3 in parallel operation with their total flow in series with tanks 4, 5, and 6, which would then also be in parallel operation.

It is also possible by other changes in piping, to utilize one or more of the tanks as sand filters for the removal of suspended material, to use them as activated carbon filters ahead of a demineralizer system, or for uses other than demineralization. For example, the equipment could be used with all six tanks in parallel (i.e., with no crossover hoses) as a six tank sodium zeolite softener. This system, by virtue of its flexibility, could also be used for other special applications whereby ion exchange resins (scavenging resins) are used for the removal of ions from a solution.

The following table illustrates some of the modes in which the system may be configured and operated:

__________________________________________________________________________TANK NO.1       2     3     4     5     6     MODE OF OPERATION__________________________________________________________________________Treatment Material(s):(a)  sand  sand  sand  sand  sand  sand  all tanks in parallel(b)  activated   activated         activated               activated                     activated                           activated  carbon   carbon         carbon               carbon                     carbon                           carbon                                 all tanks in parallel(c)  cation   cation         cation               cation                     cation                           cation                                 all tanks in parallel(d)  cation/   cation/         cation/               cation/                     cation/                           cation/  anion anion anion anion anion anion all tanks in parallel(e)  scavenging   scavenging         scavenging               scavenging                     scavenging                           scavenging  resin resin resin resin resin resin all tanks in parallel(f)  cation   cation         anion anion anion cation/                                 parallel/series: tanks 1 and                           anion 2 in parallel; tanks 3, 4, and                                 5 in parallel; tank 6 in series(g)  cation   cation         cation               cation                     anion anion parallel/series: tanks 1, 2, and                                 3 in parallel; tanks 4, 5 and 6                                 in parallel(h)  cation   cation         anion anion cation/                           cation/                                 parallel/series: tanks 1 and                     anion anion in parallel; tanks 3 and 4 in                                 parallel; tanks 5 and 6 in                                 parallel(i)  cation   weak base         strong base               cation/                     not used                           not used   anion anion anion             all tanks in series__________________________________________________________________________

The ability of the system to be regenerated in place was described earlier. It can also, by virtue of its design, be backwashed in place prior to regeneration. In this case, backwash water would be admitted through valve 60 and removed through valve 58 or through valve 65.

Since ion exchange resins are susceptible to rapid deterioration at low temperatures, the entire trailer is insulated and heated. A gas heater 70, mounted in the forward end of the trailer, is provided to maintain the temperature above 35° F. under the most extreme outside temperature conditions, even down to -20° F.

All of the valves have not been shown in the drawing for simplicity. For example, valves 58, 60, 65, 66, 62, 64, and 68 are identical on each tank.

The important features of the inventive system are that it is very flexible in its use, that is, it has a variety of applications through not only piping flexibility, but also because of the number of tanks and the various combinations of resin which they can contain. Not only is this system suitable as mentioned above for use with resins, but for any other water treatment processes which require a pressure vessel and the passing of the water through a fixed bed of material, whether that material be sand, activated carbon, ion exchange resin, or a special catalyst that is used in some highly specific industry.

In this system, all of the tanks are interconnected using hose. The reason for this is to prevent possible difficulties with the piping system if it were to be connected with rigid pipe. The trailer will deform slightly and hose is used so that each tank is individual and can move independently of the others without damage to itself or to the other tanks. Further, by use of flanged piping, the piping can be rearranged to allow the use of the tanks in series, in parallel, or in series/parallel. The trailers are strengthened to withstand this type of load.

The above-described embodiments are intended to be illustrative, not restrictive. The full scope of the invention is defined by the claims, and any and all equivalents are intended to be embraced.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2938868 *Mar 11, 1955May 31, 1960Infilco IncMethod of controlling regeneration of ion exchangers and apparatus
US3630365 *Jun 11, 1969Dec 28, 1971Energy Systems IncTransportable liquid waste treatment plant
US4155846 *Oct 19, 1977May 22, 1979Bowdle Paul HMulti-segmented adsorption ion exchange or gell filtration column apparatus and process
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4514294 *Oct 3, 1983Apr 30, 1985Robert G. LaymanApparatus for decontaminating hydrocarbons containing PCB
US4540493 *Nov 30, 1983Sep 10, 1985Ecolochem, Inc.Process for treating wash water from the manufacture of terephthalic acid
US4556492 *Dec 16, 1983Dec 3, 1985Ecolochem, Inc.Deoxygenation process
US4561976 *May 15, 1984Dec 31, 1985Stan HouserWater purification system
US4648976 *Mar 7, 1985Mar 10, 1987Belco Pollution Control CorporationIntegral water demineralizer system and method
US4655909 *Dec 18, 1984Apr 7, 1987Nippon Paint Co., Ltd.Water-deionizing system
US4659460 *Mar 25, 1985Apr 21, 1987Ecolochem, Inc.Mobile fluid purification unit
US4675108 *Jun 26, 1985Jun 23, 1987Ecolochem, Inc.Apparatus for treating wash water from the manufacture of terephthalic acid
US4681682 *Jul 26, 1983Jul 21, 1987Alar Engineering CorporationAir flotation clarifier
US4687573 *Aug 13, 1984Aug 18, 1987Pall CorporationSorbing apparatus
US4695386 *May 20, 1985Sep 22, 1987Advanced Separation Technologies IncorporatedProcess for the decolorization of pulp mill process streams
US4759844 *Mar 21, 1986Jul 26, 1988Aquathin Corp.Portable water purification system
US4764271 *Feb 13, 1987Aug 16, 1988Acosta William AWater treatment apparatus
US4818411 *Jul 26, 1985Apr 4, 1989Ecolochem, Inc.Deoxygenation process
US4830641 *Apr 13, 1987May 16, 1989Pall CorporationSorbing apparatus
US4855043 *May 15, 1987Aug 8, 1989Quantum Conditioning Technology, Inc.Water conditioning system
US4857184 *Sep 7, 1988Aug 15, 1989Deloach AnthonySelf-contained water treatment system and enclosure
US4925552 *May 12, 1988May 15, 1990Biotrol, Inc.Arrangement for water purification
US5024766 *Nov 9, 1988Jun 18, 1991Shahzad MahmudPoint of use deionized water purification unit
US5062958 *Feb 28, 1990Nov 5, 1991Biotrol, Inc.Method for water purification
US5068029 *Feb 20, 1990Nov 26, 1991Tigg CorporationTwo-chamber fluid/solids treatment vessel
US5069796 *May 7, 1990Dec 3, 1991Fox James RSystem for removing volatile components from water derived from wells
US5139734 *Nov 26, 1990Aug 18, 1992Westinghouse Electric Corp.Resin processing system
US5160443 *Apr 18, 1991Nov 3, 1992Butler AssociatesLiquid recycling system
US5217605 *Sep 20, 1991Jun 8, 1993Kottke Gordon VPortable multi-element electric discharge machine filter system
US5233876 *Apr 4, 1991Aug 10, 1993The Dow Chemical CompanyApparatus and methods for on-line analysis of one or more process streams
US5242589 *Dec 16, 1991Sep 7, 1993Cheng-Wei HsuFilter that changes the direction of water current arbitrarily
US5268300 *Dec 8, 1992Dec 7, 1993Nalco Chemical CompanyAuditing contaminated water effluents for feasible reuse
US5300230 *Jan 4, 1993Apr 5, 1994Wm. R. Hague, Inc.Comprehensive water treatment system
US5328105 *Feb 20, 1992Jul 12, 1994Nortru, Inc.Transportable processing unit capable of receiving various chemical materials to produce an essentially homogeneous admixture thereof
US5401399 *Aug 27, 1993Mar 28, 1995Magnusson; Jan H.Water purification system
US5417937 *Jun 3, 1991May 23, 1995Ciba-Geigy CorporationApparatus for wet oxidation
US5453207 *Nov 1, 1993Sep 26, 1995Simpson; Gregory D.Biocide treatment system and method
US5482862 *Nov 10, 1994Jan 9, 1996The Dow Chemical CompanyMethods for the on-line analysis of fluid streams
US5490933 *Mar 17, 1994Feb 13, 1996The Dow Chemical CompanySelf-regulated biological scrubber and/or gas stripper for the treatment of fluid streams
US5552043 *Mar 16, 1994Sep 3, 1996Norland International, Inc.Water conditioning system
US5611920 *Jun 19, 1995Mar 18, 1997Unichem International Inc.Biocide treatment system and method
US5674389 *Jan 29, 1996Oct 7, 1997Rhee; Choong H.Removal of tetrachloroethylene impurity from water
US5681454 *Jan 4, 1994Oct 28, 1997Urs JagerLiquid processing plant
US5681531 *Nov 3, 1995Oct 28, 1997The Dow Chemical CompanyApparatus for mixing at least partially immiscible liquids
US5720885 *Sep 16, 1993Feb 24, 1998Simon Moos Maskinfabrik A/SProcess and device for the treatment and/or dewatering of sludge taken from waste water cesspools, especially small-scale sewage treatment plants
US5785857 *Oct 31, 1996Jul 28, 1998Mobile Process Technology, Inc.Mobile process for the recovery of spent heat transfer fluids
US5863510 *May 26, 1993Jan 26, 1999Atc Associates, Inc.Modular interchangeable treatment system
US5922198 *Dec 8, 1997Jul 13, 1999Mobile Process Technology, Co.Mobile process for the recovery of spent heat transfer fluids
US5972216 *Oct 24, 1997Oct 26, 1999Terra Group, Inc.Portable multi-functional modular water filtration unit
US6036866 *Mar 10, 1997Mar 14, 2000Ecodyne Water Treatment, Inc.Apparatus and method for fluid treatment units connected in parallel
US6183637 *Jul 23, 1998Feb 6, 2001Seh America, Inc.Resin trap device for use in ultrapure water systems and method of purifying water using same
US6296772 *Mar 23, 2000Oct 2, 2001Corn Products International, Inc.Split ion exchange system and method of operating
US6416669Nov 10, 2000Jul 9, 2002Seh America, Inc.Resin trap device for use in ultrapure water systems and method of purifying water using same
US6475385 *Nov 10, 2000Nov 5, 2002Seh America, Inc.Resin trap device for use in ultrapure water systems and method of purifying water using same
US6638422 *Nov 3, 1999Oct 28, 2003Steven H. SchwartzkopfLiquid filtration apparatus and method embodying filtration particles having specific gravity less than liquid being filtered
US6733661 *Aug 16, 2001May 11, 2004Renesas Technology Corp.Ultrapure water producing apparatus
US7223337 *Jan 26, 2004May 29, 2007Goodway Technologies CorporationApparatus and method for cleaning cooling tower recirculating water
US7270745Aug 4, 2003Sep 18, 2007Schwartzkopf Steven HLiquid filtration apparatus embodying super-buoyant filtration particles
US7270755Jan 28, 2005Sep 18, 2007Schwartzkopf Steven HLiquid filtration method embodying superbuoyant filtration particles
US7282156 *Oct 25, 2006Oct 16, 2007Goodway Technologies CorporationApparatus & method for cleaning cooling tower recirculating water
US7678265 *Jan 26, 2004Mar 16, 2010Water Treatment ConstructionArrangement for separating environmentally harmful substances from a polluted mass
US8110115Dec 21, 2010Feb 7, 2012Ibex IncorporatedMobile water treatment
US8435391Jul 31, 2008May 7, 2013Rockwater Resource LlcElectrocoagulation apparatus with in-place electrode cleaning
US8469100 *Aug 4, 2009Jun 25, 2013Engineering Fluid Solutions, LlcIntegrated fluid filtration and recirculation system and method
US8790517Apr 6, 2011Jul 29, 2014Rockwater Resource, LLCMobile station and methods for diagnosing and modeling site specific full-scale effluent treatment facility requirements
US9005448 *Aug 12, 2011Apr 14, 2015General Electric CompanyMobile water treatment and resin transfer hub
US9126852May 17, 2012Sep 8, 2015Infilco Degremont, Inc.Mobile system for treatment of water by deionization
US20020185426 *Apr 22, 2002Dec 12, 2002Bealer Leroy J.Environmental flexible remediation system
US20040262206 *Jun 27, 2003Dec 30, 2004Doug GettmanMobile field electrical supply, freshwater and saltwater purification system, powder wash, wash station, and water collection and reclamation apparatus
US20050006311 *Jul 9, 2003Jan 13, 2005Usf Consumer & Commercial Watergroup, Inc.Automatic sensing of valid regeneration signal
US20050016906 *Nov 14, 2003Jan 27, 2005Doug GettmanMobile field electrical supply, water purification system, wash system, water collection, reclamation, and telecommunication apparatus
US20050029204 *Aug 4, 2003Feb 10, 2005Schwartzkopf Steven H.Liquid filtration apparatus and method embodying super-buoyant filtration particles
US20050127011 *Jan 28, 2005Jun 16, 2005Schwartzkopf Steven H.Liquid filtration apparatus and method embodying super-buoyant filtration particles
US20050224401 *Mar 10, 2005Oct 13, 2005Dennis ChancellorFiltration system with inter-filter flow controls
US20070012629 *Jan 26, 2004Jan 18, 2007Per-Ake FagrellMethod and arrangement for separating environmentally harmful substances from a polluted mass
US20070045203 *Oct 25, 2006Mar 1, 2007Franzino Joseph JApparatus & method for cleaning cooling tower recirculating water
US20080105620 *Nov 6, 2006May 8, 2008Hicks Lawrence AWater purification system
US20090032446 *Aug 1, 2007Feb 5, 2009Triwatech, L.L.C.Mobile station and methods for diagnosing and modeling site specific effluent treatment facility requirements
US20100116652 *Jul 31, 2008May 13, 2010Wiemers Reginald AElectrocoagulation apparatus with in-place electrode cleaning
US20110000861 *Jul 2, 2010Jan 6, 2011Bear Creek Services, LLC.Portable and Scalable Water Reclamation System and Method
US20110030951 *Feb 10, 2011Irvine William OIntegrated fluid filtration and recirculation system and method
US20110089123 *Apr 21, 2011Ibex IncorporatedMobile water treatment
US20130037477 *Feb 14, 2013Andrew ParkeMobile water treatment and resin transfer hub
US20140054211 *Apr 24, 2012Feb 27, 2014Brita GmbhSystem and method for conditioning a liquid such as water
US20150183665 *Mar 12, 2015Jul 2, 2015General Electric CompanyMobile water treatment and resin transfer hub
DE4311837A1 *Apr 10, 1993Oct 13, 1994Moos Simon MaskinVerfahren und Vorrichtung zur Verarbeitung und/oder Entwässerung des aus Abwassergruben, insbesondere Kleinkläranlagen, entnommenen Schlammwassers
DE9003524U1 *Mar 27, 1990Sep 27, 1990Roediger Ag, Muenchenstein, ChTitle not available
EP1288164A1 *Aug 31, 2001Mar 5, 2003Adsoca AGProcess and mobile plant for purifying waste water containing organic substances
EP1685069A1 *Nov 8, 2004Aug 2, 2006Seung Gwang Co., Ltd.Auto-regenerable hot and cold water softener
EP2709956A4 *May 17, 2012May 27, 2015Infilco Degremont IncMethod and apparatus for treating water and wastewater
WO1984004087A1 *Apr 13, 1984Oct 25, 1984Ecolochem IncMobile fluid purification unit
WO1985002353A1 *Nov 27, 1984Jun 6, 1985Ecolochem, Inc.Recovery of organic acids, catalysts and water from terephthalic acid manufacture
WO1985002605A1 *Dec 11, 1984Jun 20, 1985Ecolochem, Inc.Deoxygenation process and apparatus
WO1986006297A1 *Apr 29, 1985Nov 6, 1986Layman Robert GApparatus and method of decontaminating hydrocarbons containing pcb
WO1991012869A1 *Feb 8, 1991Sep 5, 1991Tigg CorporationTwo-chamber fluid/solids treatment vessel
WO1994024059A1 *Sep 16, 1993Oct 27, 1994Simon Moos Maskinfabrik A/SProcess and device for processing and/or dewatering sludge liquor from waste water tanks, in particular small sewerage purification plants
WO1999050194A1 *Mar 26, 1999Oct 7, 1999Garcia Martinez Juan RamonInstallation for filtering liquids
WO2006025811A1 *Aug 2, 2004Mar 9, 2006Schwartzkopf Steven HLiquid filtration apparatus and method embodying super-buoyant filtration particles
Classifications
U.S. Classification210/87, 210/96.1, 210/264, 210/241, 210/93, 210/284
International ClassificationB01D35/18, C02F1/42, C02F9/00, B01D35/14, B01D15/04, C02F1/00, C02F1/28, B01J47/02, B01D15/00, B01J47/00
Cooperative ClassificationC02F1/283, B01D35/14, C02F2001/425, C02F2209/05, C02F2001/427, B01D35/18, C02F9/00, B01J47/002, B01D23/00, B01D15/00, C02F2201/008, C02F2001/422, C02F2209/02, B01J47/026
European ClassificationB01D23/00, B01D35/18, B01J47/00D, B01D15/00, B01D35/14, C02F9/00, B01J47/02D
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Aug 26, 1981ASAssignment
Owner name: ECOLOCHEM, INC., 4545 PATENT ROAD, NORFOLK, VA 2
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNORS:MULLER, RICHARD S.;DICKERSON, RICHARD C.;REEL/FRAME:003899/0941
Effective date: 19810526
May 21, 1986FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 4
Oct 23, 1990FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 8
Aug 17, 1994FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 12