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Publication numberUS439139 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 28, 1890
Filing dateJan 20, 1890
Publication numberUS 439139 A, US 439139A, US-A-439139, US439139 A, US439139A
InventorsThomas F. Gayistor
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Setting for coins
US 439139 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

T. F. GAYNOR. SETTING 190B Goms.

Patented Oct. 28, 1890.

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UNITED STATES PATENT OEEICE.

THOMAS F. GAYNOR, OF LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY.

SETTING FOR COINS.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 439,139, dated October 28, 1890. Application filed January 20, 1890. Serial No. 337,461. (No model.)

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, THOMAS F. GAYNOR, ay citizen of the United States, residing at Louisville, in the county of Jefferson and State of Kentucky, have invented a new and useful Improvement in Settings for Coins, of which the following is a specification. i

My invention relates to improvements in settings for coins, medals, bangles, and similar articles when it is desirable to wear such articles as ornaments for personal adornment or the like.

The object of my invention is to provide a setting that will securely hold coins and similar disk-shaped articles in such a manner as to leave their faces visible without necessitating the boring of holes through them or else the soldering of wire loops thereto as a means of fastening, which is now generally the custom when it is desired to wear them as ornaments upon the persorn My object is also to provide a setting that can be readily attached to and separated from such coins and objects without injury to either the setting or the articles referred to.

My object is further to provide a setting in which coins of different sizes and values may be easily and quickly interchanged without materially altering the size or appearance of the setting when such exchange has been made.

This invention is for a purpose similar to that of another invention of mine for which l received Letters Patent of the United States, No. 417,016, dated December l0, 1889, for an improvement in settings for coins, to the speciications of which reference is hereby made for a more extended description of the purposes of devices of this character. In that invention the setting is shown as being made in the form of an annular-shaped clasp, which might be of one piece, or else of two semicircular-shaped parts, one end of each of which being pivoted to the other, and each having a threaded spur upon its other end and to both of which when brought together a lock-nut was fitted. A split and pivoted form of bushing to hold the smaller coins is 'also shown as proper for such a setting.

Now in this form ot setting the device is shown as consisting of a shell and a cap iitted thereto, both being separable from each other. The lock-nut is dispensed with and the bushing is made in the form of a solid ring without being jointed or pivoted in any way. That certain forms of fastening may be applied to the setting, l find it desirable to make the latter as herein shown and described, when such forms of fastening are to be used.

This invention consists in providing a setting consisting of a shell having an internal diameter large enough to receive a coin therein, and by its periphery and in providing said shell with a front flange of such dimensions as will allowr as much as possible of the face of the coin that may be placed therein to be visible, and yet prevent the coin from dropping out of the shell, and in providing the shell with a thread upon which a threaded cap is fitted, by means of which said coin may be secured within the shell. y

The invention also consists in providing means by which the cap and shell may be separated from each other by the lingers alone without necessitating the use of a wrench, screw-driver, or other tool, that the coin may be removed from the setting or replaced therein when desired, and with as little delay or effort as possible. j

v The invention also consists in providing the ,setting with a fastening by means of which it may be secured to the clothing, watchchains, or otherwise upon the person of the wearer, as desired.

The invention further consists in providing means by which the shell and cap when closed'together may be prevented from separating while being handled in the ordinary its inner surface, to

way, thereby guarding against the possibility of losing the coin.

The invention further consists in providing the setting with bushings of suitable sizes, by means of which coins of sizes smaller than the largest one the setting is intended to hold may be held therein without otherwise changing the setting itself. Y

l attain these objects by means of the devices illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in Which- Figure 1 represents a front elevation of the IOO setting with a coin in position therein. 2 represents a side elevation of Fig. 1,and being shown partly in section that the relative position of the coin and the parts of the set-- ting may be more clearly seen. The cap is also shown provided with a cushion of elastic material, which presses the coin forward against the front iiange of the shell. It is also shown with a loop-shaped fastening attached thereto. Fig. 3 shows a side vertical sectional view of the shell of the setting seen in Figs. 1 and 2, in which a thread is shown as cut upon its internal surface. A sectional view of the front flange of the shell is also shown, by which the coin is held Within the setting. Fig. et shows a side elevation of the coin as removed from the shell. Fig. 5 shows a side elevation of the cap seen in Fig. 2 and as removed therefrom. ltis shown provided with a threaded surface, by which it is litted to the shell, forming the other part of the setting. The threaded portion, however, is shown partly removed that the cushion of elastic material which is secured to the inside ofthe cap may be more clearly seen. It is also shown as being provided with a milled edge, by which it may be screwed into or out of the shell, Fig. 3. Fig. 6 shows a side elevation of the cushion, also seen in Figs. 2 and 5, and as detached from the cap. Fig. 7 shows a front View of Fig. 6. Fig. 8 represents a front elevation of a setting inclosing a coin of a size smaller than the maximum-sized coin the setting is capable of holding, and being provided with a bushing-ring having an eX- ternal diameter equal to that of the said maximum-sized coin and an internal diameter equal to that of the smaller-sized coin aforesaid, and by means of which such smaller coin is thereby secured in position in the setting. Fig. 9 shows aside elevation of Fig. 8, and being partly in section that the relative positions of the several parts when the coin isin the setting maybe more clearly understood. It also showsacurved flat spring secured to the outside of the shell, which has a frictional bearing upon the milled edge of the cap, that the latter may be thereby prevented from being accidentally unscrewed out of the shell. It is also shown provided with a studbutton fastening. Fig. 10 represents a side vertical sectional view ot' Fig. 8 with the cap removed, showing the shell, the bushing, and the coin in position therein. Fig. 1l showsa front elevation of the bushing-ring referred to in Figs. 8, 9, and 10. Fig. 12 shows a side vertical sectional view of Fig. 11. `ig. 13 shows a side vertical sectional View of the cap seen in Fig. 9 and detached from the shell. Fig. 14 shows a side elevation of the coin removed from the setting, as seen in Figs. 8, 9, and 10. Fig. 15 shows a setting having a form of such shape, as byreason of its angular contour the lingers may retain a better grip for the purpose of separating the 'shell from the cap, when desired. It is shown in front elevation and as being provided with a Fig. loop-fastening attached to the edge of the shell. Fig. 16 shows a side elevation of Fig. 15. The cap is also shown having a spiral wire fastening. Fig. 17 shows a side elevavation of a setting provided with small spurs projecting from the periphery of the shell for the purpose of providing a better grip when the setting is to be manipulated. A hinged pin-and-hook fastening is shown attached to the cap. Fig. 18 shows a side elevation of a setting similar to that seen in Fig. 17, only having spurs upon both the shell and the cap and in being' provided with a screw-fastening. Fig. 19 shows a side view of a nut adapted to be screwed upon the screw-fastening seen in Fig. 18. Fig. 2O shows a side view of a setting provided with'a common form of buttonfastening. Figs. 21 and 22, respectively, show side elevations of the shell and the cap of a setting provided with an inclined slot-and-pin coupling, by means of which the shell and cap may be secured together in case they are of very thin material and of insufficient thickness to admit of athread being formed thereon, such as is seen in some of the other figures. Fig. 22 also shows another form of pinfastening. Fig. 23 shows a front view of a part of a setting or of a bushing, which may be used when it is desirable to showas much as possible of the face of the coin when in position in the setting. When a shell or bushing is to be made in this manner, the front flange of the shell or bushing, as the case may be, is to be all cut away, excepting a few little prongs of a suflicieut number and strength to hold the coin in position, which are left between the cuts, as shown. Fig. 21 shows a front elevation of a setting containing a center of the form of a monogram, which may be substituted for the coin when the latter is removed from the setting or in any way not available. It is intended to be ofthe same thickness as the coin it is to be substituted for. It is also shown for the purpose of illustrating howother centers than coins may be used in the setting when desired. Fig. 25 shows a side elevation of Fig. 24 and provided with a button fastening somewhat similar to that shown in Fig. 20. The cap is shown as almost entirely flush with the back edge of the shell, only a very small part of the edge of the former being visible. In this form of setting the grip of the fingers in unscrewing is obtained upon the broad surface of the shell and upon the fastening itself, which is usually riveted 0r soldered to the cap, thereby giving a hold upon the latter.

Similar letters refer to similar parts throughout the several views.

A represents a shell of a suitable metal or material, having the shape of an anuulus or flat ring, the inner diameter of which is barely large enough to allow the coin C to drop freely into it until it rests upon the seat made by the inwardly-projecting flange or wall A', which forms a part of` the face of the shell.

The dimensions of this flange may be only two IOO IIO

or three hundredths of an inch or merely Both the shell A and the cap B are pro-- vided with milled projecting edges A3 and B2, by means of which the shell A and the cap B may be screwed together or unscrewed -and separated from each other when it is desirable to insert a coin in the setting or remove it therefrom.

I) in Figs. 2, 5, 6, and '7 represents a cushion of elastic material-such as rubber, cork, or the like-which may be cemented to the inside of the cap B or otherwise secured within it. This cushion presses when the latter is in position in the shell A and yields to any inequalities of thickness of the coins inserted in the setting. It also causes a trictional pressure of the threads of the cap upon the threads of the shell, and

thereby prevents the two parts from being ac-- cidentally unscrewed from each other.'

E represents a common loop of suitable metal, soldered or riveted to the outside of the cap B, as may be convenient.

In Figs. 8, 9, 10, and 12 the shell, the cap, and the cushion are similar to those parts in Figs. 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, and 7, as already described, but a smaller-sized coin C is shown as being substituted for the maximuimsized coin C, (shown in Figs. 1, 2, and 4,) that the setting is capable of holding.

A bushing F, having the same diameter and thickness as the maximum-sized coin C at its periphery, is substituted for said coin C in the shell, as seen in Figs. 9 and 10. This bushing F is provided with a small flange or Wall F', similar in dimensions and purpose to the iiange A as already described. The internal diameter of the bushing being large enough to receive the small coin C', it' can be seen that when the bushing is placed within the shell and the small coin C placed in position in the bushing and the cap is screwed into the shell, the coin and bushing will be held in firmly by the pressure ot the cushion against the coin, as seen in Fig. 9.

G in Fig. 9 represents a piece ot flat springmetal, curved around the side of the shell and riveted thereto. It projects over the edge of the cap and exerts a spring-pressure thereon, as seen at G. This spring is for the purpose of preventing the accidental unscrewing of the cap if the pressure of the cushion be deemed insufficient or less desirable.

In Figs. 15 and 16 the edges of the shell and cap are shown of octagonal contour as a substitute for the annular form having the milled edges, the angularity of the setting giving suticient grip for screwing the parts together, or the reverse.

17, 18, and 1.9 small spurs H H H In Figs.

against the coin O are shown, whichmay be riveted or soldered to the part-s it' a grip of that order would be desirable.

In Figs. 21 and 22 the shell and cap are shown provided with an inclined slot I and a pin J, respectively, which is a modiiication of the screw principle, and may be used as a means of securing the two parts together if they are to be made of very thin metal or the like, Where there would not be stock enough on the parts to form threads upon. j

In Fig. 23, K K K show little prongs of: the ange of either a shell or a bushing when it is desirable to show as muchas possible of the face of the inclosed coin, the rest ot' the flange being cut away, as shown.

In the drawings all oi' the forms of a fastening shown are old and-well known and are shown only to illustrate how they lnay be applied to the setting, as they need no description otherwise, being well understood.

The manipulation ot the device may bedescribed as follows: When it is necessary to insert in or remove from the setting a coin, the shell and the cap are grasped between the iingers of each hand, and the two parts may then be quickly separated,and then the coin inserted or removed from the shell, as the case maybe, andthe parts closed together again, of course screwing or unscrewing the parts in the operation; but requiring no tool of any kind to do this. When a small coin is to be held, the bushing made to fit it is to be employed in the manner already shown and described. Any oi' the several forms ot fastening shown, or any other suitable fastening, may be employed to attach the setting to the clothing or otherwise to the person of the wearer. Only a single-flanged bushing is shown in the drawings, as by this form of construction it can be used without jointing or splitting it toy allow the coin to be placed in position therein; but it can be readily understood that the ordinary jointed or split bushing-that is, one having two anges-can also be used instead of the one shown, if so desired. By the use of these settings persons having coins which they are desirous of carrying as souvenirs or as articles of personal adornment are enabled to do this without being obliged to attach loops to such coins or make holes in them or in any way distigure them` or impair their value. This setting has been referred to as being specially adapted for coins; but it can be seen that centers of any description that may be iitted to it may be held as well as coins. Hence it admits of a wide range of application-as, for instance, with ten settings of different designs and ten centers also of difterent designs and adapted to fit in the settings and the latter being all of the same internal diameter and capacity, and consequently the centers all being interchangeable in the settings, it can be seen that ten times ten or a hundred diiierent combinations could be thus produced to make a selection from. This feature of interchangea- TOO bility of centers and settings of this class and bypersons usually unskilled in such matters and Without the use of tools is a novel idea, so far as I am aware, and constitutes one of the advantages of the device.

By the Word center-s, as used in the preceding sentences, I mean the coins or other articles which the settings are intended to hold, each constituting as it does the central or middle portion of the Whole ornament thus formed by its combination with a setting.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim, and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is-

1. In a setting, the combination of an annular shell having a flange projecting inwardly from its front edge, and having a thread upon its internalsurface from its back edge, and a cap threaded externally to fit the threaded portion of said shell, and being provided with a fastening, substantially as specifie 2. In a setting, the combination of an annular shell having a flange projecting inwardly from its front edge, and having a thread formed upon its internal surface from its back edge, and being milled upon its exterior surface, and a cap externally threaded to fit the threaded portion of said shell and having its outer edge milled, and being provided with afastening, substantially as speci` fie 3. In a setting, the combination of an annular shell having a flange projecting inwardly from its front edge, and having a thread formed upon its internal surface from its back edge, and a capthreaded externally to fit the threaded portion of said shell and having a cushion of elastic material upon its inner side, and being provided with a fastening, substantially as specified.

4. In a setting, the combinationof an annular shell having a flange projecting inwardly from its front edge, and having a thread formed upon its internal surface, a bushing having a flange and adapted to fit Within said shell, and a cap threaded externally to fit the aforesaid shell, and being provided With a fastening, substantially as specified.

5. In a setting, the combination of an annular shell having a flange projecting inwardly from its front edge, and having a thread upon its internal surfacefromits back edge, acap threaded externally to fit said shell having its outer edge milled, and being provided With a fastening, and a spring secured to the outside of the shell the free end of which is adapted to bear frictionally upon the said milled edge of the aforesaid cap when said cap is screwed into said shell, substantially as specified.

6. In a setting, the combination of an annular shell having a flange consisting of a series of prongs and a cap fitted to said shell, and being provided with a fastening, substantially as specified.

7. In combination With a setting consisting of an annular shell having a flange projecting inwardly from its front edge and a cap fitted to said shell, and being provided with a fastening, a bushing provided with a ange consisting of a series of prongs, substantially as specified.

THOMAS F. GAYN OR. Vitnesses:

M. V. BARLOW, T. F. OBRIEN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4220016 *Feb 27, 1976Sep 2, 1980Frenger Rita KSkin jewelry
US5426828 *Aug 30, 1993Jun 27, 1995Kusano; YukioSeparable button assembly for removable connection to a cloth article or the like
US6427487May 5, 2000Aug 6, 2002Allison MorganInterchangeable jewelry item
US6532766Aug 26, 1999Mar 18, 2003Meang K. ChiaDecorative jewelry item
US6629434Sep 14, 2001Oct 7, 2003Meang K. ChiaDecorative jewelry article
US7036339Jun 30, 2000May 2, 2006Chia Meang KJewelry item
US7654112Jul 27, 2006Feb 2, 2010Aponwao Design Inc.Jewelry forming article and method
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA44C25/001