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Publication numberUS439963 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 4, 1890
Filing dateApr 30, 1890
Publication numberUS 439963 A, US 439963A, US-A-439963, US439963 A, US439963A
InventorsFrank J. Ludington
Original AssigneeThe Ludington company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cigarette-machine
US 439963 A
Images(13)
Previous page
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

(No Model.) 13 ShgefisSheet 1. F. J. LUDINGTON.

CIGARETTE MACHINE.

No. 439,963. Patented Nov. 4, 1890.

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CIGARETTE MACHINE. No. 439,963. Patented Nov. 4, 1890.

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F. J.v LUDINGTON. CIGARETTE MACHINE.

No. 489,963. Patented Nov. 4, 1890.

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(No Model.) 13 Sheets- Sheet 6.

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CIGARETTE MACHINE. No. 439,963, Patented Nov. 4, 1890'.

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No. 439,963. Patented Nov. 4, 1890.

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No. 439,963. Patented Nov. 4, 1890.

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F. J. LUDI NGTON. CIGARETTE MACHINE.

No. 439,963, Patented Nov. 4, 1890.

(No Model.) 13 Sheets-Sheet 13. F. J. LUDI-NGTON.

' CIGARETTE MACHINE.

Patented No krw Q NITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

FRANK J. LUDINGTON, OF WATERBURY, ASSIGNOR TO THE LUDINGTON COMPANY, OF NEWV HAVEN, CONNECTICUT.

CIGARETTE-MACHINE.

- SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 439,963, dated November 4, 1890.

Application filed April 30, 1890.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, FRANK J. LUDINGTON, of Waterbury, in the county of New Haven and State of Connecticut, have invented a new and useful Improvement in Cigarette -Machines; and I do hereby declare the following, when taken in connection with accompanying drawings and the letters of reference marked there0n,to be a full, clear, and exact description of the same, and which said drawings constitute part of this specification, and represent, in-

Figure 1, a top or plan view of the machine, the non-essential portion of the rear broken off; Fig. 2, a front View of the machine complete; Fig. 3, a side view of the same, looking from the right of Fig. 2, the nonessential portion of the rear end broken oif; Fig. 4c, a side view from the left, a portion of the front and rear broken off; Fig. 5, a vertical sectional side view illustrating the operative parts in their normal position, non-essential parts broken away; Fig. 6, a partial section representing the deliverer as just ready to take tobacco; Fig. 7, a transverse section on line A A of 5; Fig. 8, a detached view of the driving-shaft, showing the cams thereon; Fig. 9, a detached front view of the presserbar I) and its operating mechanism, showing parts in vertical section; Fig. 10, a detached front View of the papencutters, showing the paste-rolls in section with the operative mechanism of the rolls and cutters; Fig. 11, a longitudinal section on line B B of Fig. 1, showing inside View of thepaste-rolls and the rolling devices; Fig. 12, a transverse section through the paper-table, illustrating the jaws as taking the paper; Fig. 13, a detached sectional side view, illustrating the rolling mechanism as just delivering the cigarette to the cutters; Fig. 14, a horizontal longitudinal section through the paper-finger carriage,showing top view of the rolling-table,paper-fingers, paper-table, and cutters with the fingers in position for delivering the paper to the rolling devices; Fig. 15,adetached longitudinal vertical section through the paper table and cutters with side View of the fingers in a position as when the paper is out; Fig. 16, a transverse sectional view illustrating the Serial No. 350,035. (No model.)

opening and closing movement of the paperdelivering fingers; Fig. 17, a detached view representing the cam and lever which operates the finger-carriage; Fig. 18, the same as Fig. 14, representing the paper-finger as taking the paper from the table; Fig. 19, a detached top View showing the elongated finger through which the opening and closing movement is givento the paper-fingers; Fig. 20, a modification in the paper-feed. Fig. 5 and the subsequent figures are enlarged.

This invention relates to an improvement in machines for making cigarettes and in which the tobacco is supplied in mass, the requisite quantity taken therefrom, a wrapper presented, the tobacco rolled and inclosed by the wrapper, the edge of the wrapper pasted, and thecigarette delivered complete from the machine, the operations all being automatic, the invention being an improvement upon the machine for which Letters Patent of the United States No. 400,780 were granted to me, dated April 2,1889, the object of the present invention being to insure a positive delivery of the requisite quantity of tobacco, the perfect wrapping of the same, and so that the cigarettes delivered from the machine may be perfectly uniform as to size and the quantity of tobacco; and it consists in the construction as hereinafter described, and more particularly recited in the claims.

A represents the driving-shaft, which is supported in suitable bearings, as here represented. This shaft carries a gear B, through which the shaft receives revolution from a pinion C on a shaft D, and to which pinion revolution is imparted through a pulley E or other suitable means. This shaft A is represented detached in Fig. 8.

F represents the table over which the tobacco is supplied. This table is of considerable length, and upon its surface is an endless apron G, passing around a roller H at its forward end, thence down and between drums I J below the table, and, continuing to the other end of the table, passes around adrum (not shown) at that end of the table, the direction of movement of the apron being as indicated by the arrow in Fig. 5, and so that the tobacco laid upon this apron will be advanced as the apron moves. The table is provided with walls KK upon opposite sides, between which the apron runs.

At or above the delivery end of the table a stationary plate L is arranged, beneath which an endless apron N runs, passing up over the forward end of the plate, and thence over a drum N and beneath a drum 0, down around the rear end of the plate. The movement of this apron M is the same as that of the apron G, as indicated by the arrow; The plane of the plate L is inclined slightly toward the delivery end, and so that the space between the apron M and the apron G gradually contracts toward the delivery end. An intermittent rotary or advance movement is imparted to the drums I and N, so that tobacco supplied to the apron G and distributed thereon will be carried by the apron G into the space between the aprons M and G, and then advanced by the two aprons bearing upon the mass, which will bring it to a standard thickness at the said delivery end.

The intermittent rotary motion is imparted to the drums I and N through aratchet P on the shaft of the drum J. On the shaft of the ratchet P a bell-crank lever R S is hung, the one arm R carrying a pawl T, (see Fig. 4,) which works into teeth of the ratchet P, and so that as the lever carrying the pawl vibrates it will impart a corresponding rotation to the drum J, as indicated by the arrow, Fig. 5, and impart a corresponding movement to the apron G. On the shaft of the drum I is a gear-wheel U, which works into a corresponding gear V on the shaft of the drum N. (See Fig. 1, and also seen in broken lines, Figs. 4 and 5.) The bell-crank lever B S receives its vibration from a cam W on the driving-shaft through a rod X carrying a stud or anti-friction roll Y, which works on the periphery of the said cam, the end of the rod being hung to the arm S of the said bell-crank lever, and as seen in Figs. 2 and 8, and also seen in broken lines, Fig. 4, and so that at each revolution of the driving-shaft one vibratory movement is imparted to the said bell-crank lever, and a second advance step in the rotation of the drums carrying the aprons, this step in advance being timed so that the tobacco between the aprons will be correspondingly delivered. This tobaccofeeding device does not difier materially from that of my previous patent.

Immediately forward of the drum H, over which the apron G runs, is a tobacco-delivery table a, (see Fig. 5,) and onto which the tobacco so fed by the aprons will pass. Directly over the rear edge of this table 0; is a presserbarb, arranged transversely across the table that is, at right angles to the path of the tobacco. This bar is brought down upon the tobacco when it has been fed by the aprons, as before described, and so that the requisite portion has advanced onto the table a. The object of the bar is to consolidate the tobacco beneath it and hold it firmly. The presserbar I) is attached to a bar d, arranged transversely over the apron M, and carried by vertically-guided rods e, one on each side the machine, (see Fig. 9,) and to which a vertical reciprocating movement is imparted from a cam f on the driving-shaft A, the cam working upon an arm g, attached to a rock-shaft h, which rock-shaft carries a pair of arms M, extending into connection with the respective rods 6, carrying the presser-bar, as seen in Figs 5 and 9, and also seen in Fig. 4, partly in broken lines, the shape of the cam being such, as indicated in Fig. 5, that at the proper time the presser-bar will be brought down upon the tobacco, as indicated in broken lines, Fig. 5, and consolidate the tobacco directly beneath the bar, this pressure being produced after the requisite quantity of tobacco has been delivered.

The tobaccodeliverer, and by which the requisite quantity of tobacco is taken and delivered to the rolling devices, consists of a transverse bar Z. (See Figs. 5 and 7.) This bar carries upon its front edge a guard m and upon its rear edge a comb n. The comb is composed of a series of sharp teeth, which are adapted to enter the mass of tobacco close up to the presser-bar and be forced down through the tobacco. Then the bar Z, receiving an advance movement, will cause the comb to separate the mass of tobacco between the comb and the guard m from the mass, the

mass being held back by the presser-bar b.

The distance between the comb n and the guard m corresponds to the width required for the tobacco which the comb is to so separate from the mass and which is required for the formation of a cigarette, it being understood that the width of the aprons between the sides K K of the table F corresponds to the length of the mass of tobacco which the comb is to separate for the formation of a cigarette. The deliverer first stands above the tobacco, so as to bring the comb close up against the presser-bar b, as seen in Fig. 6, and then a downward movement of the deliverer takes the guardm forward of the projecting portion of the tobacco, and the comb through the tobacco close up against the guard. The deliverer is then advanced, as seen in Fig. 5, the comb separatingthe tobacco within the deliverer from the mass held by the presser-bar b. To impart such combined up and down and backward and forward movements to the deliverer, the bar Zis attached at each end to vertical rods 0, which rods eX- tend down and are connected by a shaft p. (See Figs. 5 and 7.) The shaftp is carried by arms M, extending from a rock-shaft s below the driving-shaft, and to this rock-shaft an oscillating movement is imparted by cams t on the driving-shaft through a forked lever u, made fast to the shaft .9, as seen in Fig. 5, and also seen in broken lines, Fig. 4, and so that the oscillating movement of the shaft will impart a corresponding up-and-down movement to the rods 0 and the bar 1 connected thereto, as indicated by broken lines,

Fig. 5. The forward-and-backward movement is imparted to the bar Z by means of cams 2 2 and a connecting-rod 3, hung to a shaft 4; between the two bars 0 0, and above the shaft 19, as seen in Figs. 5, 7, and 8, the cams working the one in one direction and the other in the opposite direction to produce a positive movement, and so that under the action of the said cams 2 the bar Z, with its comb and guard, will be moved rearward from the position seen in Fig. 5 to that seen in Fig. 6, and return, and then advanced from the position seen in Fig. 6 to that seen in Fig. 5, the operation of the cams t in the meantime being to first raise the deliverer from the position seen in Fig. 5 to that seen in broken lines, same figure, in which raised position the deliverer is moved rearward, as seen in Fig. 6, and in that rearward position the bar, with its comb and guard, is forced downward, as indicated in broken lines, Fig. 6, so that the requisite quantity of tobacco will be taken between the comb and the guard beneath the bar Z, and then in the advance movement of the deliverer the tobacco so taken will be advanced on the table a. The surface of the table a is in the arc of a circle corresponding to the are described by the lower edges of the comb and guard, as seen in Figs. 5 and 6, so that the comb and guard will Work nearly or quite in contact with the surface of the table throughout the said advance movement. The advance movement of the tobacco thus made brings it to a position close to the edge of the table a.

In order that the tobacco maybe discharged from the deliverer as it rises from the posi tion seen in Fig. 5 to that seen in broken lines, same figure, and so that the tobacco will be left upon the table as the deliverer rises, a follower 5 is arranged beneath the bar Z and between the guard and comb. This follower is supported upon two guide-rods 6, which extend up through the bar Z, the upper ends of the said rods being headed, and springs 7 are applied between the heads of the rods and the top of the bar I, as seen in Figs. 5 and 7, the tendency of these springs being to hold the follower in the up position between the guard and comb, as seen in Figs. 5 and 7, the bar Z being so far above the lower edges of the comb and guard as to permit the presence of the follower and allow space below the follower for the tobacco, as before described. The follower is independent of the bar so far as vertical movement is concerned,and is attached at its ends to levers 8 8, one at each side of the rods 0. The said levers are hung to the rods 0 by slotted connections, as represented in broken lines, Fig. 5, and so that the bar Z may move vertically independent of the levers 8, yet the said levers 8 must partake of the vibratory or swinging movement of the rods 0, which carry the bar Z. The levers 8 are provided with studs or stops 9, (see Fig. 7,) which work beneath correspond- 1ng stationary cams 10, so that the ascent of the follower is limited, and the follower is held up'by the springs 7 to bring the stops 9 against the stationary cams 10, as seen in Figs. 5 and 7. The bearing-cams 10, upon which the stops 9 work, are of cam shape, and so that as the deliverer is moved rearward the follower may rise to a limited extent, and then as the deliverer advances the follower will be correspondingly depressed, serving to compress the tobacco in the deliverer to some extent during its passage over the table a; but as the deliverer rises, after having been advanced, as indicated in broken lines, Fig. 5, and commences its retreat the follower begins its ascent, so as to leave the tobacco in its proper place on the table a. The under surface of the follower 5 is liable to be gummed by its contact with the tobacco, and as it fits closely between the comb and guard, as the deliverer rises the gum which may adhere to the comb and guard will be scraped off by the follower. To remove this gum from the follower a cleaner is provided, which consists of a transverse scraper 12, arranged to move up and down through the table in rear of the deliverer in its advanced position, as seen in Fig. 5. Normally this scraper stands down flush with the surface of the table, so that the tobacco will pass freely over it as it advances; but as the deliverer retreats the scraper rises, asseen in Fig. 6, into a position where the then projecting follower may rub across the upper edge of the scraper 12, and so that the gum will be scraped from the follower, and this scraping occurs at each retreating movement of the deliverer. The scraper 12 is carried by two vertical rods 13, hung upon the shaft 19, as seen in Figs. 5 and 7. The connection between the said rods 13 and the shaft 19 is by a slotted connection 14, so that the downward movement of the scraper is positive, while the upward movement is produced by springs 15, thus permitting the scraper to yield under the movement of the follower over it. The tobacco thus delivered at the edge of the table a is ready for the rolling and wrapping operation.

16 represents the rolling-table, which is arranged in advance of the table a, and so as to leave an open space between the forward edge of the table a and .the rear edge of the rolling-table 16, as seen in Fig. 5. The working-surface of the rolling-table is in the form of an arc of a circle, the center of which circle is a rock-shaft 17, arranged beneath the rolling-table. To the forward edge of the rolling-table the rolling-apron 18 is attached, the apron extending rearward over the table, its rear edge being attached to a swinging rod 19, the length of the apron being so much greater than the length of the table 16 thatthe rear end of the apron may pass beneath the delivery-table a, as seen in Fig. 5. The rod 19 is attached to the lower end of arms 20, which arms are hung upon axes 21 above.

ITO

IIS

(See Fig. 7.) The hub of each arm is provided with a'pinion 22, (seen in broken lines, Fig. 4,) into which a corresponding toothed segment 23 works. This segment is formed on one arm 24 of the bell-crank lever, the said lever being hung upon an axis 25, the other arm 26 of the said lever extending rearward, and so that the said segment may receive a vibratory movement. Preferably a like segment is provided for each arm 20, so as to insure a firm support to the swinging rod 19. The vibratory movement is imparted to the bell-crank lever 24 26 from a cam 27 on the driving-shaft, and through a transverse rock-shaft 28, on which is a bell-crank lever 29 30. (See Fig.8 and broken lines, Fig. 4, Fig. 8 showing the lever at one side only.) From one arm 30 of the said bellcrank lever a rod 31 extends into connection with the arm 26 of the toothed segment-lever, and from the other arm 29 a connecting-rod 32 extends into connection with the cam, and so as to impart vibratory movement in one direction to the segment 24, the return movement being produced by aspring 33, (see Fig. 4,) and thus a forward-and-back swinging movement will be'imparted to the rod 19, carrying one end of the apron 18, as from the position seen in Fig. 5 to that seen in Fig. 11, and return.

On the rock-shaft 17 two arms 34 are hung projecting radially upward and so as to work, respectively, each side of the rolling-table 16. The upper ends of the arms 34 are connected by a bar 35,formingarolling-guard, the guard being concavo-convex in transverse section, the concave side being rearward. This guard, under the swinging movement of the arms 34, is adapted to pass over the table from its rear position (seen in Fig. 5) to its. extreme advanced position. (Seen in Fig. 13.) Normally, as seen in Fig. 5, the guard 35 stands below the apron 1S, and so that as it rises it will strike the apron on its under side. On each arm 34 and on a pivot 36 an arm 37 is hung, the arms 37 being slotted, so as to permit a vertical movement of the said arms 37 on the pivots, and also a vibrating movement in a plane parallel with the plane of movement of the arms 34. The arms 37 are held in their forward position against a stop 38 by springs 39. The said arms 37 are each permitted a vibrating movement to the rearward toward a stop 40 on the opposite side, the arms being free for such movement, except as to the resistance of the springs. Each of the arms 37 is provided with an inwardly-proj ectin g spindle 41, (see Figs. 1 and 5,) which extend inward over the apron 18. These spindles in diameter correspond to the diameter of the tobacco of a complete cigarette. The spindles 41, resting on top of the apron, hold the arms 37 in their up or forward position, as seen in Fig. 5, while the arms 34, upon which the arms 37 are hung, are in their extreme rear position. The vibratory movement is imparted to the arms 34 by two cams 42 on the driving-shaft operating in both directions upon a connecting-rod 43, which extends into connection with a downwardly-proj ectin g arm 44, fast on the shaft 17, as seen in Fig. 5. The spindles 41 rest upon the apron, as seen in Fig. 5, and press down thereon under the power of their springs 39, and so that as the arms 34 are thrown forward the guard 35 will strike the apron upon its under side in rear of the spindles 41, and then the guard, continuing its movement, the bar 19 at the same time moves forward. The spindles ride over downwardly-inclined arms 45 at the rear of the table, so as to take a bearing thereon, as indicated in broken lines, Fig. 11. This bearing for the spindle offers a resistance to their advance with the guard 35, and so that the apron, slacking somewhat, the guard 35 advances independent of the spindles 41 and passes over the spindles, making a fold in the apron around the spindles, as seen in Fig. 11. The'guard now stands forward of the spindles and so as to hold the apron firmly closed around the spindles, which will form a tubelike space in the apron just in rear of the guard 35. Thence as the arms 34 advance the apron will be carried over the table, as indicated in broken lines at the right, Fig. 11, maintaining the same tubular form, as before described, the arms 20 holding the apron taut, and this will continue until passing beyond the opposite end of the rolling-table, as seen in Fig. 13, that end of the apron being secured to the table, the fold around the spindles escapes, and so that the spindles may under the action of their spring be delivered from the apron and return toward their normal position, as seen in Fig. 13.

The tobacco for one cigarette having been left upon the table a, as before described, as the deliverer next advances it will force the tobacco from the table, it falling onto the apron 18. The apron is then folded over the tobacco by the advance of the guard 35 and the arms 34, as before described,bringing the tobacco into the fold and between the ends of the spindles 41, which brings it into cylindrical shape, and so that it will roll with the fold of the apron over the table and so as to be discharged at the opposite side of the table, as indicated in Fig. 13. During the movement of the guard 35 and the spindles 41 over the table the apron is held taut by the arms 20, the apron readily sliding around the spindles and over the rounded back of the guard. The tobacco being thus rolled for one cigarette, the arms 34, with the guard they carry, the spindles, and .the bar 19 return to their normal position,'as seen in Fig. 5, ready for the tobacco for the next cigarette.

During the rolling operation of the tobacco, and before it has reached the front side of the table, thewrapper in which the tobacco is to be rolled is laid upon the apron in front of it, as represented in Fig. 11, 46 representing the wrapper and the broken lines at 47 indicating the position of the tobacco when the wrapper is presented. The wrapper thus presented will be rolled around the tobacco as the rolling of the tobacco continues toward theedge of the table, and the outer edge of the paper, being coated with suitable adhesive material, will adhere to the surface of the preceding convolution of the paper and so as to secure the paper around the tobacco. The paper may be thus presented by hand; but I provide automatic mechanism for presenting the paper at the propertime. It is necessary that the paper for the wrapper shall be presented with the grain of the paper running in the direction of the length of the cigarette, and for the reason that if the grainof the paper runs circu mferentially of the cigarette the moistening of the edge of the paper with adhesive material will cause that edge to full up and wrinkle, so as to produce an unsatisfactory surface; butif the grain of the paper runs lengthwise of the cigarette the moistening of the surface does not so wrinkle the paper. The paper is therefore cut in a strip lengthwise of the grain of the paper, the width of the strip being sufficient to wrap the cigarette, the wrappers being cut from this strip in lengths required for the cigarette.

In the mechanism which I have devised for presenting the wrapper to the rolling mechanism the path of feed for the strip of paper is parallel with the path of the rolling mech anism, and the paper-delivering mechanism is adapted to take thewrapper cut from the paper thus running longitudinally, giveto it a one-quarter turn, and so as to present the wrapper transversely across the rolling-apron. The paper is arranged upon a spool 48, supported upon a suitable bearing 49, so that the paper may be readily drawn from the spool, the axis of the spool being transverse to the path of the rolling mechanism, and it is arranged above the rolling-table at one side, as represented in Figs. 1, 2, and 3. The paper is led from the spool down throughaguide onto a longitudinally'arranged table 51, (see Fig. 11,) the table lying'in a horizontal plane parallel with the path of the rolling mechanism and in a position at one side of the line of the rolling-table, as seen in Fig. 1. The paper-table is constructed with longitudinal slots 52, opening rearward or.toward the rolling mechanism, as seen in Figs. 1 and 14, and so that as the paper lies upon this table, as seen in Figs. 11 and 12, 53 representing the, paper, its upper surface is exposed above and its under surface is exposed through the longitudinal slots 52.

The feeding device consists of a pair of jaws 54 and 55,tl1e jaw 55 being hinged to the jaw 54, as at 56, (see Fig. 16,) 54 being the lower jaw, and so that the jaw 55 may swing up ward from the j aw 54, as represented in broken lines, Fig. 16. The jaw 54 projects from a hub 57, which is made fast to a vertical shaft 58, this shaft being supported in a suitable bearing 59, so that it may receive an oscillatory motion and so as to take the jaws from the position represented in Fig. l4,transversely across the rolling-table 1.6, to a position at right angles thereto, as indicated in broken lines, Fig. 14, and in line with the papertable 51, and after having been presented into line with the paper-table, as seen in broken lines, Fig. 14, the open jaws are advanced longitudinally onto the paper, one jaw above and the otherbelow, tothe position indicated in Fig. 18, and as seen in Fig. 12, and so that as the jaws in that position close the one jaw 54 will be upon the under side of the paper and the other jaw 55 upon the upper side, and so as to grasp the paper between them and within the slots 52 in the table, as seen in Fig. 12, and then as the jaws recede from the position seen in Fig. 18 to the position seen in broken lines, same figure, they will draw the paper with them, the path of movement of the paper in this operation being longitudinal or parallel with the path of movement of the rolling devices.

The oscillating movement is imparted to the shaft 58 by means of a toothed rack 60, working into a toothed pinion or segment 61 on said shaft 58, as represented in Figs. 14 and 18. The bearing 59, which carries the shaft, is attached to or made as a part of a longitudinal carriage 62, arranged to reciprocate on a longitudinal stationary guide 63. (See Figs. 1, 3, and 11.) To the said carriage a reciprocating movement is impart-ed by a cam 64 on the driving-shaft through a lever 65, hung upon a fulcrum 66 in the frame, and a connecting-rod 67, extending from the upper end of the said lever into connection with the carriage, as seen in Fig. 1, this cam operating to impart the drawing or feeding movement to the carriage-that is, to draw it from the position represented in Fig. 18 to that seen in Fig. 14. The toothed rack 60 is arranged in the carriage 62 so as to be free for a certain amount of longitudinal movement in both directions, independent of the carriage. A spring 68 is arranged in the car riage to bear against the forward end of the rack, and from the rear end of the rack proj ects a stud G9, which is adapted to engage a corresponding stationary stop 70 in the rear movement of the carriage. The carriage standing in the extreme rear position, as seen in Fig. 14, the jaws stand transversely across the rolling-table, and the spring 68 is com pressed, the rack being held against the stop 70. Now, as the carriage commences its forward movement toward the paper-table, the spring 68 will hold the rack against its stop, so that the carriage will advance independent of the rack, and the carriage taking with it the shaft 58, which carries the pinion 61, that pinion works in the then stationary rack and receives a rotation, as indicated in broken lines, Fig. 18, which causes the jaws to turn from the position seen in Fig. 14 to that seen in broken lines, Fig. 18, and into line with the swing of one-quarter of a circle. At this time the rack has been brought to a stand by any suitable stop. (Here represented as by ablank surface on the periphery of the pinion.) Coming into contact with the rack, as seen in Fig. 18, the spring will therefore tend to hold the jaws firmly in this position, and from this time the rack will move with the carriage, while the carriage continues its movement until the jaws are carried onto the paper, as seen in Fig. 18, and as before described. Then the jaws having taken the paper, the carriage returns, the jaws being still held in the same relation to the carriage in which they took the paper, and until the rack comes into contact with the stop 70, as indicated in broken lines, Fig. 18. Now the rack will'cease its movement, and the continued movement of the carriage in that direction will operate, through the pinion 61, to return the shaft and bring the jaws into the position seen in Fig. 14 across the rollingtable. In the first retreating movement of the jaws, as from the position seen in Fig. 18 to that seen in broken lines, same figure, the paper is drawn from the spool and table to the extent of that movement, and that movement corresponds to the length required for a single wrapper. The formation of the cam 64. is such as to give a rest to the jaws when that position is reached, and so that the paper held by the jaws may be cut off to the required length for a wrapper. The closing and opening movement of the jaws upon or from the paper is produced by means of a vertical sliding collar 71, arranged on the shaft 58, as seen in Fig. 16. This collar is constructed with an annular groove 72, and is provided with a spring '73, the tendency of which is to hold the collar in its up position. From this collar an arm 74 extends vertically into engagement with a finger 75, projecting from the hub of the hinged jaw 55, and so that a downward movement of the collar 71, as indicated in broken lines, Fig. 16, will raise the jaw 55, or the upward movement of the collar will cause that jaw to close. The upward movement is produced by the spring 73.- The downward or opening movement is produced by means of a cam 76 on a counter-shaft 77 and a lever 78, engaging a vertically-swinging finger 79, which works in the grooves 72 of the collar 71, as seen in Fig. 16, and so that at the proper time the jaws are closed upon the paper on the paper-table, and then after the jaws have been swung to their position over the rolling-table the jaws are opened. As the jaws are held open from the time they deliver the paper to the table until they have passed onto the paper at the paper-table, the finger 79 is made of alength sufficient to permit the sliding movement of the carriage without disengaging the collar 71 from the finger, as seen in Fig. 19. The counter-shaft 77 receives its revolution from abeveled pinion 80, working into a corresponding pinion 81 on the counter-shaft 7 7, as seen in Figs. 1 and 3, the said pinion being a stud-pinion,

and receives its revolution from a gear 82 on the shaft A, working into a corresponding gear 83 on the hub of the pinion 80. To cut the paper for a wrapper after it shall have been drawn outward by the fingers, as before described, a pair of cutters 84 and 85 are arranged to work transversely across the paper. These cutters are two blades, (see Figs. 10 and 18,) hung upon a pivot 86, so that both may swing in a plane at right angles to the run of the paper. They are provided with a spring 87, the tendency of which is to force the cutters to the closed position, as seen in Fig. 10, and so that the paper 53, standing between the cutters, will by such action of the spring be out. The cutters are mechanically opened by means of a cam 88 on the shaft 77, connected by a rod 89 to a lever 90, hung upon a rock-shaft 91. One arm of the lever extending upward carries a roller 92, which works between the cutters outside their cutting-edges, the cutters being constructed with a cam shape, as shown, so that as the lever 90 swings in one direction, as indicated in broken lines, it will permit the cutters to close; but forced in the opposite direct-ion it will cause the cutters to open. This mechanism for operating the cutters is substantially the same as that employed in my patent before referred to. The cutters operate when the jaws have moved to the position indicated in broken lines, Fig. 18, and as seen in Fig. 15, and so that the jaws then holding a length of paper sufficient for a single wrapper the cutters will sever that wrapper from the strip of paper, as indicated in broken lines, Fig. 15, leaving the paper on the table ready for the jaws, when they shall be presented for a second wrapper, and so on. v

The jaws having thus taken the wrapper are turned, as before described, to the position seen in Fig. 14, and also seen in Fig. 11, turning the paper from the longitudinal position in which it was taken into a transverse position, and so as to present the paper longitudinally across the rolling-table and directly in advance of the rolling devices, as represented in Fig. 11, and so that the rear edge of the paper will be taken by the advancing bight in the apron, and then the jaws opening and leaving the pap'er,bya return swinging movement the paper will be rolled around the tobacco, as before described. To apply the paste to the edge of the paper, a paste-roll 93 is arranged parallel with the paper at the time it is out, (see Figs. 10 and 11,) and is hung in a lever 94, the lever being fixed to a rook-shaft 95, as seen in Fig. 11, and so that the roll 93 may be moved toward or from the pivot, as indicated in broken lines, Fig. 10. An oscillating movement is imparted to the rock-shaft 95, to give this back-and-forward movement to the roll 93, by means of a cam 96, operating upon an arm 97, projecting from the rock-shaft 95, as seen in Figs. 10 and 11. An auxiliary pasting-roll 98 is arranged upon an axis parallel with the roll 93, and so IIO I go

as to work in close contact thereto, the object being to properlyspread thepaste upon the surface of the pasting-roll To impartrevolution to the pasting-roll, a counter-shaft 99 is arranged in suitable bearings 100, and this counter-shaft receives revolution by means of a belt 101 around a pulley 102 on the shaft 77 and a corresponding pulley 103 on the counter-shaft 99. (See Figs. 1 and 3.) The shaft 99 carries a pinion 10%, which works into a similar pinion 105 on a stationary axle below a corresponding pinion 106 (see Fig. 1) on the auxiliary paste-roll 98, and the opposite ends of the paste-roll arbors are connected by pinions 107 108, (see Fig. 3,) and so that a constant revolution will be imparted to the pasterolls in the direction indicated by the arrow, Fig. 10, and so that as the paste-roll 93 is advanced toward the edge of the paper its pasted surface will come into contact with the paper at its edge, and so as to apply sufficient adhesive material to the edge of the paper to cause it to adhere when rolled, as before described.

To deliver the cigarette, I provide a pair of fingers 109, arranged upon a rock-shaft 110, the said fingers being adapted to receive the finished cigarette, as represented in Fig. 13, and then under a partial rotation of the rockshaft 110 the fingers take the cigarette downward, as indicated in broken lines, Fig. 13, and so that it may fall therefrom onto an endless carrying-band 111, as also seen in broken lines, Fig. 13. The two receiving-fingers are distant from each other less than the length of the cigarette, and at each side this pair of fingers a pair of cutters 112 113 are arranged. The cutters 112 of each pairthat is, the lower cuttersare stationary and the upper cutters 113 are hung upon a rockshaft 114, and so as to swing in a vertical plane, the two pairs of' cutters being distant from each other the length of a finished cigarette. In the open position, as seen in Fig, 13, the swinging cutter 113 stands above the" cigarette, which is received by the fingers 109. As the fingersdrop, the ends of the cigarette will rest upon the stationary cutters 112, it being understood that the cigarette as it comes from the machine will unavoidably have more or less ragged projecting ends, and thus resting on the stationary cutters the swinging cutters 113 are simultaneously brought down, as seen in broken lines, Fig. 13, and clip off the ends of the cigarettes, thereby insuring an equal length of all cigarettes delivered from the machine, the cigarettes so clipped falling onto the carrying-band 111 or other receptacle which may be provided for them. Theswingingmovementisimpartedto the cutters 113 from a cam 115 on the shaft A through a connecting-rod 116, jointed to an arm 117, extending from the rock-shaft 114, and an oscillating movement is imparted to the shaft 110 by a finger 118,projecting from the hub of the arm 117. This finger works against a stud 119 on a gear 120, which gear works into a corresponding gear 121 on the finger-shaft 110, and so that as the arm 117 is turned in closing the cutters the first part of such movement will cause the finger 118 to turn its gear 120, which in its turn will throw the fingers 109 downward, as seen in broken lines, Fig. 13, and then after the cigarette has been delivered the fingers return under the action of a spring. (Not shown.) An adjusting-screw 122 is provided as a stop against which the stud 119 may strike in its return movement, so as to properly locate the fingers to receive the next cigarette. The endless band 111, for delivering the cigarettes, runs over a drum 123 on one side of the machine and a correspondingdrum 124 upon the opposite side of the machine, and so as to run transversely across the machine between guides 125. Power to drive this band is derived from a gear 126 on the shaft 77, working into a corresponding pinion 127 on the arbor of the drum 123. The fingers for receiving the cigarette, the cutters for clipping the ends of the cigarette, and the endless band to receive the cigarette, are all substantially the same as in my previous patent hereinbefore referred to.

The comb of the deliverer maybe employed without the guard or follower to separate the tobacco, the separation of the tobacco by the comb being a great advantage over the cutter such as employed in my patent before referred to, inasmuch as it separates the requisite quantity of tobacco from the mass without a positive cut of the fibers, and the comb, either alone or with the follower and guard m, may be employed with other rolling mechanism, such, for illustration, as that described in my before-mentioned patent. The rollingapron, combined with the spindles 41 and the guard 35, may be employed to advantage with other tobaccodelivering mechanism, such, for illustration, as that shown in my patent before referred to. This part of my invention is therefore not to be understood as limited to the tobacco-delivering devices illustrated and described.

The wrappers, as before stated, may be presented to the rolling devices by hand or by any suitable mechanism, such, for illustration, as that described in my patent before referred to; or the cylinder of tobacco may be taken from the machine as it is completed and the wrapper applied by hand.

The paper-delivering jaws, arranged, as I have described, so as to swing upon a vertical axis and give the one-quarter turn, may be employed without the reciprocating movement which I have describedthat is, the shaft upon which the jaws swing may be ina stationary position, and other means employed to deliver the paper to the jaws-as, for illustration, feed-rollers working upon the paper on the paper-table, as illustrated in Fig. 20; or the paper may be otherwise delivered to the fingers, so that the delivery of the paper to the jaws may be at one side of the

Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA24C5/473