Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS441805 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 2, 1890
Filing dateFeb 3, 1890
Publication numberUS 441805 A, US 441805A, US-A-441805, US441805 A, US441805A
InventorsAlfred J. Parker
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Alfred j
US 441805 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

(No Model.)

A. J. PARKER. REGEPTAGLE OR HOLDER IN-HATS.

Patented Dec. 2, 1890.

THE nonms PETERS c0, vuorwurmm wAsumamn n. c.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

ALFRED J. PARKER, OF NEIV YORK, N. Y.

RECEPTACLE OR HOLDER lN HATS.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 441,805, dated December 2, 1890. Application filed February 3, 1890. $erial No. 339,023 (No model.)

To a/ZZ whom it may concern.-

Be it known that I, ALFRED J. PARKER, a subject of the Queen of Great Britain, residing at the city and State of New York, have invented an Improvement in Receptacles or Holders in Hats, of which the following is a specification.

Before my invention various devices had been made use of within the crown of a hat for holding therein cigars, gloves, and other articles, and in Letters Patent No. 417,365, granted to me, a holder is represented in which the box or receptacle is held by an arch, the ends of which can be cut off to vary the height of the arch within the hat.

My present improvements are adapted to different sizes of hats, and the arclrpiece is made of two parts connected with a half-circle band passing inside the lining or hatsweat, so that the arch-piece is held up in position, and connected to the arch-piece is a spring-clasp for grasping a paper of tobacco, gloves, cigars, or other articles inserted within the clasp.

In the drawings, Figure 1 is a section of a hat with the holder inserted therein. Fig. 2 represents the parts of the arch-piece laid out flat. Fig. 3 is a separate section of the clasp at right angles to Fig. l; and Fig. 4 is a detached plan View of the holder.

The clasp A has two jaws or plates 2 and 3, bent up out of one piece of sheet material, or one jaw being connected to the other, and there is a spring B acting to draw one jaw of the clasp toward the other. For ordinary purposes the clasp may be made of pasteboard or similar material, either plain or covered with ornamental paper or fabric, and the spring B may be an india-rubber band slipped around the clasp, as shown by dotted lines,Fig. a, so as to draw one jaw toward the other; or the spring may be inserted through incisions in the material of the clasp, as represented by full lines in the drawings; or any suitable spring may be made use of to draw one jaw of the clasp toward the other, and this clasp is held within the hat with the I plate or jaw 2 against or connected with the interior of the crown of the hat 0. I prefer to make use of slots in the plate 2, into which are inserted the ends of thearch-piece D,

these ends being inserted through slots in opposite directions so as to be firmly connected therewith, and the semicircular band E connects the ends of the arch-piece D, and it is adapted to pass between the inside of the hat and the lining or sweat-band, and such semicircular band holds the arch-piece D firmly in position, and by drawing the ends of the arclrpiece more or less through the slots in the plate 2 the clasp maybe supported at the proper place and closely against the interior surface of the crown of the hat.

It will be apparent that this clasp is adapted to the reception of a card-case, a box of cigarettes, a match-box, a pair of gloves, a hatbrush, cigars, or other light articles within the hat, and that in consequence of holding such articles firmly by the action of the spring they are not liable to drop out of the hat or become separated in the act of lifting the hat off the head.

I claim as my invention 1. A holder adapted to be placed within a hat and formed of two jaws and a spring to draw the one toward the other, in combina tion with an arch-piece connected with the holder and adapted to pass down at the sides of the hat between the same and the lining or sweat-band, substantially as set forth.

2. The arch-piece having a connection between the two ends that is adapted to pass into the hat between the lining or sw eat-band and the hat and extending upwardly and across the hat, in combination with a holder fastened to the two ends of the arch-piece, substantially as set forth.

3. The arch-piece or support adapted to pass into a hat between the lining or sweatband and the hat and extending upwardly, in combination with a holder having two jaws and a spring to draw one part toward the other, there being slots in one jaw, into which the upper ends of the arch-piece are received, substantially as set forth.

Signed by me this Qlth day of January, 1890.

ALFRED J. PARKER.

'itnesses:

GEO. T. PINCKNEY, WILLIAM G. Mom.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3997156 *Jan 22, 1975Dec 14, 1976Marvin Glass & AssociatesMagic hat
US5950242 *Sep 19, 1997Sep 14, 1999Mahoney; Kevin S.Attachment for cap straps
US6170087 *Aug 10, 1999Jan 9, 2001Garry A. BrannonArticle storage for hats
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA42B1/24