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Publication numberUS443658 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 30, 1890
Filing dateMar 31, 1890
Publication numberUS 443658 A, US 443658A, US-A-443658, US443658 A, US443658A
InventorsJames H. Carpenter
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Process of manufacturing colored paper
US 443658 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

(No Model.)

J. H. CARPENTER. PROCESS OF MA NUF-AOTURING COLORED PAPER.

No. 443,658. Patented Dec. 30, 1890.

WITNESSES. I/VVfiTA/TU/l W Mata/Q4 Kim M [07% I ATTORNEY Nirnn STATES FFEQEQ JAMES H. CARPENTER, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, ASSIGNOR OF TWO IHIRDS TO CHARLES E. OHARA, or NEW YORK, N. Y., AND

THE SEYMOUR PAPER COMPANY, OF \VINDSOR LOCKS, CONNECTICUT.

PROCESS OF MANUFACTURING COLORED PAPER.-

SPECIFIGATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 443,658, dated December 30, 1890.

Application filed March 31, 1890. Serial No. 346,089. (No specimens.)

T0 aZZ whom it may concern.

Be it known that I, J AMES H. CARPENTER, a citizen of the United States, residing at Chica go, in the county of Cook and State of Illinois, have invented a new and useful Process of Manufactu ing Colored Paper, of which the following is a specification.

In my process the pulp is first prepared for paper-making in the usual way by agitation with water. The coloring-matter is then irregularly mixed with the pulp while the pulp is in such relation to the web-forming devices that the diffusion of color may be checked by the immediate withdrawal of the water from the pulp in the process of forming the web before a uniform tint is reached and then pressing and drying the web in the usual way. 3y this process shaded and clouded color effects are produced in the finished paper.

In the drawings, Figure 1 represents a portion of the Fourdrinier machine, so called, in which I) B B are the suction-boxes; D, the dandy-roll; C, the couch-rolls, and F a tube conveying coloring-matter to the pulp at or near the point A.

.In Fig. 2, which represents a portion of acylinder-machinc, so-called, G is the vat, II the cylinder, and F a tube conveying coloring-matter to the pulp at or near the pointA.

The drawings show only so much of the machines, respectively, as is necessary to illustrate the application of my uewprocess thereto.

It is essential that the coloring-matter should be irregularly mixed with the pulp while it is in a fluid or semi-fluid state and before it has been formed into a web. Otherwise unsightly strips and blotches of color are produced, havi ng abrupt and ragged edges, because no sufficient diffusion of the color takes place to soften and shade the edges of the color-patches. It is also essential that the withdrawal of the water from the pulp should begin immediately after the introduction of the coloring material. Otherwise the color will spread and diffuse itself throughout the pulp, so as to produce a uniform tint in the finished paper.

My process is especially well adapted to be wire-cloth, called the Fou'rdrinier or making wire, which carries the layer of pulp along and at the same time is shaken laterally to facilitate the interlocking or felting of the fibers, and during this operation the water is drained on through the meshes of the wire, first by gravity and afterward by suetion-boxes, until the pulp, which at the beginning of its journey was a mass of freelymoving fibers suspended in water, has taken on the consistency of a web of wet pulp when it is delivered from the making-wire to afelt apron to be pressed, dried, and finished into paper.

Vhen the Fourdrinier machine is used, the color, which may consist of an aqueous solution of aniline dye, (though I do not limit myself thereto,) should be applied in a stream or shower to the pulp at or near the point where it enters on the making-wire, as shown at Fig. 1, A being the point at which the pulp is fed to the making-wire.

In the cylinder-machine the general mode of operation is the same, the making-wire being in the form of a cylinder partially submerged in the pulp instead of a horizontallylnoving web. In this machine the water holding the pulp in suspension escapes through the meshes of the submerged part of the cylinder, leaving a layer of pulp adhering thereto, which is lifted out of the vat by the rotation of the cylinder. lVhen the cylinder-machine is used, the color should be added to the pulp in the vat at a point adjacent to the cylinder and upon or just below the surface of the pulp, so that the coloring-matter will be drawn toward the cylinder by the current of escaping water and will not be diffused generally throughout the vat. The proper point for applying the color in this class of machines is illustrated in Fig. 2.

hen two or more streams or showers of ooloring-n'iatter are used, the coiors or tints are shaded and blended together according as the points of application are more or less widely separated, and by Varying the relative position of the points of application and the amount and character of the coloring matter an endless variety of artistic elfects may be produced. In spite of this variety the product is always characterized by a pcculiar softness of shading or clouding of the tints, and can be readily distinguished from colored paper made in the ordinary Way or from paper printed in colors or tints.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2678588 *Oct 28, 1948May 18, 1954Masonite CorpDyeing fibrous sheet material
US2721505 *Dec 4, 1951Oct 25, 1955Statens Skogsind AbProcess of spray coating a web and heating the coated surface
US4543157 *Nov 14, 1983Sep 24, 1985James River Pepperell, Inc.Method and apparatus for the manufacture of variegated paper webs
US6733627 *Jun 13, 2001May 11, 2004Meadwestvaco CorporationMethod for manufacturing paper having variable characteristics
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationD21H27/02