Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS4446915 A
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 06/368,349
Publication dateMay 8, 1984
Filing dateApr 14, 1982
Priority dateApr 14, 1982
Fee statusPaid
Publication number06368349, 368349, US 4446915 A, US 4446915A, US-A-4446915, US4446915 A, US4446915A
InventorsDonald C. Welch, Christopher P. Yoerg
Original AssigneeThe Trane Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Heat exchanger tube circuits
US 4446915 A
Abstract
Tube circuits for heat exchangers which provide same-end inlet and outlet connections are disclosed, in which each circuit includes conduits of two types. In a preferred embodiment, the first type conduit has two tubes and is generally U-shaped, and the second type conduit has four tubes. The inlets for each conduit are disposed adjacent each other in the assembled heat exchanger, as are the outlets for the conduits. To equalize flow and pressure drop a turbulence promoting device can be disposed in the U-shaped conduit. The circuits can be used for providing same-end connections on coils previously available only in opposite end connection configurations, such as for example, three-row full-circuited and six-row double circuited coils.
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(20)
We claim:
1. A multi-row heat exchanger coil having a plurality of substantially horizontal, vertically separated, circuits, each circuit comprising first and second multi-row substantially horizontal conduits, each conduit having a plurality of tubes extending the length of the heat exchanger and having interconnecting end sections disposed between the tubes for providing a continuous path of flow communication between the tubes in each conduit; said first conduit having fewer tubes than said second conduit, and having an even number of tubes at least as great as two; said second conduit having an even number of tubes at least as great as four; one tube of each of said first and second conduits forming inlet tubes for fluid to flow into said first and second conduits, and another of the tubes of each of said first and second conduits forming outlet tubes for fluid to flow from said first and second conduits; said inlet tube of the first conduit being disposed adjacent said inlet tube of the second conduit in the assembled coil, and said outlet tube of the first conduit being disposed adjacent said outlet tube of the second conduit in the assembled coil; at least one row of said heat exchanger coil being entirely comprised of inlet tubes, and another row of said heat exchanger coil being entirely comprised of outlet tubes.
2. A multi-row heat exchanger coil as defined in claim 1 in which a means is provided for equalizing the flow and pressure drop in the conduits.
3. A multi-row heat exchanger coil as defined in claim 2 in which said means includes a turbulence promoting device disposed in said first conduit.
4. A tube circuit for a multi-row heat exchanger coil, said tube circuit being substantially horizontal and comprising substantially horizontal conduits of a first and a second type, each conduit forming a generally elongated path for the flow of a fluid; inlet and outlet openings for each of said conduits disposed on the same end of the coil; said first type conduit having inlet and outlet substantially horizontal tubes and an interconnecting end section therebetween forming a generally U-shaped path for the flow of a fluid therein; said second type conduit having an even number of substantially horizontal tubes at least as great as four (4) and having interconnecting end sections between the tubes, the first and last tubes of said second type conduit forming an inlet tube and an outlet tube respectively for fluid flow through said second type conduit; said first tubes of said conduits being disposed adjacent each other in the assembled circuit, and said second tube of said first conduit being disposed adjacent the last tube of said second conduit in the assembled coil; at least one row of said heat exchanger coil being entirely comprised of inlet tubes, and another row of said heat exchanger coil being entirely comprised of outlet tubes.
5. A tube circuit for a heat exchanger coil as defind in claim 4 in which said inlet and outlet tubes of said first type conduit are disposed in different horizontal planes.
6. A tube circuit for a heat exchanger coil as defined in claim 4 or 5 in which said second type of conduit includes four tubes disposed in two horizontal planes and three vertical planes, the central of said three vertical planes containing tubes in each of said two horizontal planes.
7. A tube circuit for a heat exchanger coil as defined in claim 6 in which said tubes of said second type conduit disposed in the outer vertical planes are disposed in different horizontal planes.
8. A tube circuit for a heat exchanger coil as defined in claim 6 in which a turbulence promoting device is disposed in said first type conduit.
9. A tube circuit for a heat exchanger coil as defined in claim 8 in which said tubes of said second type conduit disposed in the outer vertical planes are disposed in different horizontal planes.
10. A tube circuit for a heat exchanger coil as defined in claim 4 or 5 in which a means is provided for equalizing the flow and pressure drop in the conduits.
11. A tube circuit for a heat exchanger coil as defined in claim 4 in which said tubes of said first type conduit are disposed in a common horizontal plane.
12. A tube circuit for a heat exchanger coil as defined in claim 11 in which said tubes of said second type conduit are disposed in the same horizontal plane as said tubes of said first type conduit.
13. A tube circuit for a heat exchanger coil as defined in claim 11 or 12 in which a turbulence promoting device is disposed in said first type conduit.
14. A tube circuit as defined in claim 4 in which said interconnecting end section of said first type conduit is substantially horizontal; said second type conduit has first, second, third, and fourth tubes in horizontal alignment with said tubes of said first type conduit and has interconnecting end sections disposed between the tubes, said first and fourth tubes being the inlet tube and the outlet tube respectively of said second type conduit; said inlet tubes of said conduits are disposed in horizontally adjacent rows of said coil; and said outlet tube of said first type conduit and said outlet tube of said second type conduit are disposed in horizontally adjacent rows of said coil.
15. A tube circuit as defined in claim 14 in which a means is provided for equalizing the flow and pressure drop of a fluid circulated through said conduits.
16. A tube circuit as defined in claim 15 in which said means includes a turbulence promoting device disposed in said first tube of said first type conduit.
17. A tube circuit for a three-row, full-circuited heat exchange coil comprising conduits of a first and a second type; said first type conduit being of a generally U-shaped configuration having first and second tubes disposed in the first and third rows of the coil respectively, and an interconnecting end section therebetween, said first tube being the inlet and said second tube being the outlet of said first conduit; said second type conduit having first, second, third and fourth tubes, with interconnecting end sections disposed between the tubes; said first tube of said second conduit being the inlet of said second type conduit and being in vertical alignment with said first tube of said first type conduit in the first row of said coil; said second and third tubes of said second type conduit being in vertical alignment with each other in said second row of said coil; and said fourth tube being the outlet of said second type conduit and being disposed in vertical alignment with said second tube of said first type conduit in said third row of said coil.
18. A tube circuit for a three-row full-circuited heat exchange coil as defined in claim 17 in which said first-mentioned interconnecting end section is disposed angularly between said tubes of said first conduit.
19. A tube circuit for a three-row full-circuited heat exchange coil as defined in claim 17 or 18 in which a means is provided for equalizing the flow and pressure drop of a fluid circulated through said conduits.
20. A tube circuit for a three-row full-circuited heat exchange coil as defined in claim 19 in which said means includes a turbulence promoting device disposed in said first tube of said first type conduit.
Description
DESCRIPTION

1. Technical Field

This invention pertains generally to the field of heat exchangers, and specifically to the field of tube circuits for heat exchangers coils which provide same-end inlet and outlet connections.

2. Background Art

Fin and tube coils are used in many different applications for transferring heat between fluids. Air conditioning systems often use cold water or refrigerant to cool air, and use steam or hot water to warm the air supplied to a conditioned space. Fin and tube coils are popular for use in such systems in that the coils are relatively compact when compared with apparatus for other heat transfer methods, and the coils can be installed in an air flow duct relatively easily. Further, fin and tube coils are readily adaptable to different types of systems, including chilled water or brine and direct expansion cooling applications, as well as steam or hot water heating applications. Parallel and counterflow relationships between the fluid in the coil and the airflow can be used, though counterflow arrangements are most popular in that, for given conditions, less surface area for heat transfer is required for counterflow than parallel flow coils.

In designing chilled water or brine air cooling systems and hot water air heating systems an air conditioning engineer has available a wide range of coil constructions to meet his needs and preferences. For example, copper or aluminum can be used as fin material, the number of tube circuits can be varied, and the number of rows or passes for the tubes in each circuit can be varied. The coils can be "half-circuited," in which every other tube in a column is fed on the supply side; "full-circuited," in which every tube of a column is fed; or "double-circuited," in which every tube of two columns is fed. Coils can be provided with "opposite end connections," in which supply and return lines are connected to opposite sides of the coil, or the coil can have "same-end connections," in which the supply and return lines are connected on the same end of the coil.

While the selections among the available options may be, in some instances, primarily a choice influenced by the personal preferences of the engineer designing the system, the performance and flow requirements, and the physical arrangement of the components and piping are also factors which affect the selection. Full-circuit, same-end connection coils have achieved wide-spread popularity, primarily because such coils can be installed easily, with the supply line and the return line being connected to the same end of the coil, and the flow and capacities of the full-circuit coils are generally quite satisfactory. Unfortunately, however, not all coil capacities are available in full-circuit, same-end connection designs, such as, for example, three-row full-circuited coils. Full-circuited, three-row coils have been available only in opposite end connection, and three-row, same-end connection coils have been available only in half-circuit designs. Thus, a capacity gap has existed between two-row and four-row, same-end connection, full-circuit coils. When a system requires a coil having the capacity of a three-row coil, and the desired arrangement is full-circuiting and same-end connection, the system designer has been forced to use a four-row coil, which has greater than necessary capacity. By decreasing flow and substantially reducing the fin counts on the four-row fin and tube coil, the heat transfer capacity of the coil can be properly sized for the system; however, the four-row coil substantially increases the initial cost of the system, even when the low fin counts are used.

The capacity gaps in other same-end connection coil series are not as great as that at the three-row, same-end connection size; however, other capacity gaps do exist. For example, six-row, double-circuit coils have been of opposite end connection design in the past, and in some circumstances, it is desirable to use a six-row, double-circuited coil with same-end connections. Other capacity gaps in same-end connection coil series can be achieved more readily by variations in the fin counts of over-sized coils.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

It is therefore one of the principal objects of the present invention to provide circuiting arrangements for tubes in fin and tube heat exchangers for coil designs not previously available, including three-row, same-end connection, full-circuit coils, and six-row, same-end connection, double-circuit coils.

Another object of the present invention is to provide tube circuits for fin and tube coils which have first and second conduits of different lengths but substantially equal pressure drop and flow in each conduit.

Yet another object of the present invention is to provide tube circuits for fin and tube coils which can be manufactured easily and economically to provide tube circuits of designs not previously available at competitive costs.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide, in the preferred embodiments, circuits which are drainable by gravity.

These and other objects are achieved in the present invention by providing coil circuits which each have conduits of first and second types. In a preferred embodiment, the first type conduit is generally U-shaped, having two tubes and an interconnecting end section, with an inlet and an outlet for the conduit disposed one in each tube on the same end of the coil. The second type conduit of the preferred embodiment has four tubes with interconnecting end sections disposed therebetween. Inlet and outlet openings are provided in the first and fourth tubes and are disposed adjacent the inlet and outlet of the first conduit on the same end of the assembled coil. In a three-row, same-end connection, full-circuited coil the first type conduit has tubes in the first and third rows, and the second type conduit has one tube in the first row, either above or below the first tube of the first conduit, two tubes in the second row, and one tube in the third row, either above or below the second tube of the first conduit. Thus, in the three-row, full circuited coil the inlets of the conduits are vertically adjacent in the first row and the outlets are vertically adjacent in the third row. In a six-row, same-end connection, double-circuited coil, the tubes of each circuit lie in a single plane, with the inlets of each in horizontally adjacent rows, and with the outlets of each in horizontally adjacent rows. A turbulence promoting device may be disposed in the first type conduit to equalize the pressure drop and flow in the first conduit to that in the second type conduit.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a side elevational view of a three-row, same-end connection, full-circuited coil embodying the present invention.

FIGS. 1A and 1B are front and back elevational views, respectively, of the coil shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 2 is an enlarged perspective view, partially broken away, of one of the tube circuits of the coil.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of one of the conduits of the tube circuit shown in FIG. 2.

FIGS. 4-10 are elevational views of the ends of three-row, same-end connection, full-circuited coils having alternative tube circuit configurations embodying the present invention, with the front end of each coil in each Figure being generally designated by the letter A, and the back end of each coil in each Figure being generally designated by the letter B.

FIG. 11 is a perspective view of a six-row, same-end connection, double-circuited coil embodying the present invention.

FIGS. 12 and 13 are elevational views of the ends of two embodiments for five-row, same-end connection, full-circuited coils encompassing the present invention, with the front end of each coil in each Figure being generally designated by the letter A, and the back end of each coil in each Figure being generally designated by the letter B.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

Referring now more specifically to the drawings, and to FIGS. 1, 1A and 1B in particular, numeral 20 designates a three-row, same-end connection, full-circuited fin and tube heat exchanger coil embodying the present invention, having tube circuits 22, 24, 26, 28, 30, and 32, and fins designated generally with numeral 34. Coil 20 can be used to transfer heat between a first fluid flowing through the tube circuits and a second fluid, typically, air, passing along the fins and over the tube circuits. Thus, the coil can be used to heat or cool air, and the fluid in the tube circuits can be water, brine, glycol, or the like. The fins may be of copper, aluminum or the like, affixed in suitable well-known techniques to the tubes. Materials for the tubes and fins and the manner of connecting the fins to the tubes are well-known to those familiar with the art of heating and/or cooling coils and will not be described further herein.

The coil 20 consists of three vertical rows of tubes designated generally by the numerals 36, 38, and 40 in the drawings. As designated by the arrows in FIG. 1A, each tube circuit has openings in row 36 which are inlet openings for the circuits, and has openings in row 40 which are the outlet openings for the circuits, and each circuit includes two vertically aligned tubes in each row. Typically, an inlet header and an outlet header are provided for the inlet and outlet openings, respectively, and supply and return lines for the fluid flowing through the circuits are connected to the headers. The locations for the inlet and outlet headers have been indicated in FIG. 1A by the dashed lines designated with numerals 42 and 44, respectively.

With reference now particularly to FIG. 2, a single tube circuit similar to circuits 22, 24, 26, 28, 30 and 32 will be described. Each of the circuits in coil 20 is similar to that shown in FIG. 2, and any number of circuits may be provided in a coil. The six circuits shown in FIG. 1 are merely demonstrative of a typical three-row coil. The tube circuits include a first conduit 60 and a second conduit 62 having inlets 60a and 62a and outlets 60b and 62b, respectively. Each circuit then includes two vertically adjacent inlets and two vertically adjacent outlets, one inlet and one outlet for each conduit in the circuit. The first type conduit 60 includes a first tube or leg 64 and a second tube or leg 66, the first tube being disposed in the first row and the second tube being disposed in the third row. An interconnecting end section 68 is disposed between the first and second tubes of the first type conduit. In the embodiment shown in FIGS. 1, 1A, 1B, and 2 end section 68 angles upwardly from the first tube to the second tube of the first type conduit. Thus, tube 64 is the lower of the two tubes in the first row of the circuit, and tube 66 is the upper of the two tubes disposed in the third row of the tube circuit.

The second type conduit 62 includes four tubes or legs, a first tube 70 disposed in the first row, a second tube 72 being the upper tube of the middle row of the circuit, a third tube 74 being the lower tube of the middle row of the circuit and a fourth tube 76 being the lower tube of the third row of the circuit. A substantially horizontal interconnecting end section 78 is disposed between the first and second tubes, a substantially vertical interconnecting end section 80 is disposed between the second and third tubes, and a substantially horizontal interconnecting end section 82 is disposed between the third and fourth tubes of the second type conduit. The second type conduit is shown individually in FIG. 3, where it can be seen that the first and second tubes are disposed in a first substantially horizontal plane, and the third and fourth tubes are disposed in a second substantially horizontal plane different from that of the first and second tubes. The second and third tubes are disposed in a common vertical plane, which essentially comprises the plane of the middle row of the three-row coil.

In the use of a tube circuit as described hereinabove, the first and second conduits are positioned such that the inlets and outlets are in vertical proximity as described above, fins are attached by conventional well-known techniques and the headers and other heat exchanger structural components are assembled. Supply and return fluid lines are connected to the headers when the heat exchanger is properly positioned in a duct or other conduit for the fluid being temperature conditioned. The coil-carried fluid is fed to inlets 60a and 62a, respectively, of the first and second conduits in each tube circuit, and the fluid flows through the conduits to the outlets 60b and 62b. The fluid being conditioned, usually air, flows over the tube and between the fins in conventional fashion, and in this regard coils using tube circuits of the present invention operate similarly to previously known coil designs. The present invention, however, now makes available coil capacities and designs with same-end inlet and outlet connections which were not previously available. An advantage of the present invention is that although previously unavailable same-end connection coils are now structurally possible through use of the invention, the new coils do not vary significantly from other coils in the same or similar coil series, relative to final installation and use, and the new coils can be used equally as well as other coils in the series.

Since the second type conduit is substantially longer than the first type conduit, having four tubes as compared with the two tubes of the first type conduit, it is desirable to equalize the pressure drop and flow in the conduits. Thus, a means for decreasing flow and increasing pressure drop in the first conduit is used. A particularly advantageous means is shown in the drawings wherein a turbulence promoting device 84 is disposed in the first type conduit to decrease flow and increase pressure drop in the first type conduit. The device may comprise a coiled wire of bronze or the like, and in addition to equalizing the flow and pressure drop in the first conduit to that in the second, the device has the added beneficial effect of increasing the tube side heat transfer coefficient, thereby enhancing the heat transfer between the fluid in the tube and the air passing thereover. Other types of turbulence promoting devices may be used to decrease flow, or various flow restrictors such as an orifice may also be used.

It should be understood that other arrangements for the tubes of each type conduit can be used to achieve the three-row, same-end connection, full-circuit arrangement. For example, in the coil shown in FIG. 4 the first tubes of the first type conduits are disposed in the top positions in each circuit, the second tubes of the first type conduit are disposed in the bottom positions in the third row of each circuit, and the inerconnecting end section 68 angles downwardly from the first tube to the second tube. This arrangement works equally as well as that described previously, and is equally desirable from a manufacturing viewpoint. FIGS. 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10 show other arrangements for the tubes of the conduits in a three-row, same-end connection, full-circuit coil. In each of the drawings, a single tube circuit has been designated with numerals corresponding to those previously used in describing the preferred circuits, wherein the inlet and outlet of the first type conduit are numbered 60a and 60b, respectively, and the inlet and outlet of the second type conduit are numbered 62a and 62b, respectively. The end section between the first and second tubes of the first type conduit is designated with numeral 68. The connecting end section between the first and second tubes of the second type conduit is designated with the numeral 78, the connecting section between the second and third tubes of the second type conduit is designated with numeral 80, and the connecting section between the third and fourth tubes of the second type conduit is designated with numeral 82. All of the configurations shown can be used for three-row, same-end connection, full-circuited coils; however, it is felt that either the configuration shown in FIG. 2 or that shown in FIG. 4 is preferable in that, from a manufacturing viewpoint, the bends and crossings of the connecting end sections required in the embodiments shown in FIGS. 5-10 would be more costly and therefore less desirable. Further, it is preferred that the tubes of the coil drain by gravity into one or the other of the headers attached thereto. The preferred embodiments shown in FIGS. 1 through 4 will drain by gravity, as will those shown in FIGS. 6 and 7 when the coil is installed substantially level.

With reference now to FIG. 11, an embodiment of the invention for a six-row, double-circuited fin and tube coil circuit having same-end connections will be described. In double-circuited coils each tube in two vertical rows is fed with fluid. In FIG. 11, the tube circuit consists of a first type conduit and a second type conduit 90 and 92, respectively, with inlets 90a and 92a and outlets 90b and 92b. The first type conduit includes first and second tubes 94 and 96, with an interconnecting end section 98. In the embodiment shown, the first and second tubes of the first type conduit comprise the first and sixth rows in the six-row coils. The second type conduit includes four tubes 100, 102, 104, and 106 disposed in, respectively, the second, third, fourth, and fifth rows of the circuit. Interconnecting sections 108, 110, and 112 are disposed between the first and second, between the second and third, and between the third and fourth tubes, respectively. All of the tubes of the first and second type conduits in each circuit of the six-row coil are disposed in the same substantially horizontal plane, with the inlets for the conduits of each circuit being horizontally adjacent, and the outlets for the conduits in each circuit being horizontally adjacent. A turbulence promoting device 114 may be disposed in the first type conduit to equalize flow and pressure drop between the conduits. A plurality of six-row tube circuits can be used in a single coil, with an inlet header provided for the inlets 90a and 92a and an outlet header provided for the outlets 90b and 92b.

Further modifications of the three-row, full-circuited and six-row, double-circuited coils can also be used. For example, in the three-row coil the inlet and outlet tubes can be disposed in the first and second rows or in the second and third rows, rather than in the first and third rows as shown. Similarly, the tubes of the six-row coil can be alternatively arranged, thereby locating the circit inlets and outlets in other rows. These and other configurations still fall within the broad scope of providing coil circuits including first and second conduits, with one of the conduits having a greater number of passes through the coil than has the other conduit.

The concept of using two conduits of different lengths in each coil circuit can be applied to other sizes and series of coils to provide same-end connection coils. For example, a five-row, full-circuited coil with same-end connections is shown in FIG. 12, and a modification thereof is shown in FIG. 13. In FIG. 12 each circuit contains two conduits with vertically adjacent inlets and vertically adjacent outlets. One conduit is a four-tube conduit and the other is a six-tube conduit, with appropriate interconnecting end tube sections. The visible portions of the four-tube conduit have been designated with numeral 120 and the visible portions of the six-tube conduit have been designated with numeral 130 in one circuit of FIG. 12. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 13 each circuit also contains two conduits, with vertically adjacent inlets and vertically adjacent outlets. In this embodiment, however, one conduit has two tubes and the other conduit has eight tubes, with appropriate interconnecting end sections. Portions of the two-tube conduit have been designated with numeral 140, and portions of the eight-tube conduit have been designated with numeral 150 for one circuit of the coil shown in FIG. 13. It should be understood that other configurations for a five-row coil can be used, with the shorter of the conduits in each circuit having either two or four tubes and the longer of the conduits in each circuit having eight or six tubes, respectively. When necessary, flow restrictions or turbulence promoting devices can be used to equalize the flow and pressure drop in the conduits.

Although numerous embodiments for three-row, and five-row same-end connection, fully-circuited coils and an embodiment of a six-row, same-end connection double-circuited coil have been shown and described in detail herein, various other changes may be made without departing from the scope of the present invention.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2054404 *Mar 13, 1935Sep 15, 1936Fedders Mfg Co IncRefrigeration apparatus
US2657020 *Sep 20, 1949Oct 27, 1953Bell & Gossett CoHeat exchanger
US2667762 *Apr 26, 1951Feb 2, 1954Borg WarnerCondenser for refrigerating systems
US3346043 *Aug 26, 1965Oct 10, 1967Sulzer AgHeat exchanger pipe coil with support means
US3675710 *Mar 8, 1971Jul 11, 1972Roderick E RistowHigh efficiency vapor condenser and method
FI31330A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4520867 *Feb 6, 1984Jun 4, 1985General Motors CorporationSingle inlet/outlet-tank U-shaped tube heat exchanger
US4901791 *Jul 25, 1988Feb 20, 1990General Motors CorporationCondenser having plural unequal flow paths
US4995453 *Jul 5, 1989Feb 26, 1991Signet Systems, Inc.Multiple tube diameter heat exchanger circuit
US5183105 *Jul 8, 1991Feb 2, 1993Brazeway, IncorporatedOpposed canted evaporator
US5311932 *Jun 5, 1992May 17, 1994Gas Research InstituteProcess and apparatus for enhancing in-tube heat transfer by chaotic mixing
US5406186 *Jan 25, 1994Apr 11, 1995Sundstrand CorporationOne switch multi-phase modulator
US5540276 *Jan 12, 1995Jul 30, 1996Brazeway, Inc.Finned tube heat exchanger and method of manufacture
US7779898 *Apr 14, 2006Aug 24, 2010Baltimore Aircoil Company, Inc.Heat transfer tube assembly with serpentine circuits
US20070240445 *Apr 14, 2006Oct 18, 2007Baltimore Aircoil Company, Inc.Heat transfer tube assembly with serpentine circuits
US20070256823 *Dec 6, 2004Nov 8, 2007Behr Gmbh & Co. KgHeat Exchanger, in Particular for an Over Critical Cooling Circuit
US20100206542 *Feb 17, 2009Aug 19, 2010Andrew Francis JohnkeCombined multi-stream heat exchanger and conditioner/control unit
US20130213626 *Feb 15, 2013Aug 22, 2013Hussmann CorporationMulti-zone circuiting for a plate-fin and continuous tube heat exchanger
US20130327509 *Feb 20, 2012Dec 12, 2013Daikin Industries, Ltd.Heat exchanger for air conditioner
US20150323230 *Mar 10, 2015Nov 12, 2015Brazeway, Inc.Tube pattern for a refrigerator evaporator
USD763417 *Jan 31, 2013Aug 9, 2016Mitsubishi Electric CorporationHeat exchanger tube
DE102010046804A1 *Sep 28, 2010Mar 29, 2012Voith Patent GmbhRohrbündel-Wärmetauscher
EP0172659A1 *Jul 22, 1985Feb 26, 1986General Motors CorporationSingle inlet/outlet-tank U-shaped tube heat exchanger
EP2629033A3 *Feb 18, 2013Jul 29, 2015Hussmann CorporationMulti-zone circuiting for a plate-fin and continuous tube heat exchanger
WO1996021835A1 *Oct 17, 1995Jul 18, 1996Brazeway, Inc.Finned tube heat exchanger and method of manufacture
WO2012048800A1Sep 27, 2011Apr 19, 2012Voith Patent GmbhTube bundle heat exchanger and waste gas heat recovery device
Classifications
U.S. Classification165/144, 165/151, 165/150, 165/DIG.498, 165/176
International ClassificationF28F13/12, F28D1/047
Cooperative ClassificationY10S165/498, F28F13/12, F28D1/0477
European ClassificationF28D1/047F, F28F13/12
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 14, 1982ASAssignment
Owner name: TRANE COMPANY THE; LA CROSSE, WI. A CORP. OF WI
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNORS:WELCH, DONALD C.;YOERG, CHRISTOPHER P.;REEL/FRAME:003988/0385
Effective date: 19820406
Aug 13, 1984ASAssignment
Owner name: TRANE COMPANY, THE
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNOR:A-S CAPITAL INC. A CORP OF DE;REEL/FRAME:004334/0523
Feb 14, 1985ASAssignment
Owner name: TRANE COMPANY THE
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNORS:TRANE COMPANY THE, A CORP OF WI (INTO);A-S CAPITAL INC., A CORP OF DE (CHANGED TO);REEL/FRAME:004372/0370
Effective date: 19840224
Owner name: AMERICAN STANDARD INC., A CORP OF DE
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNORS:TRANE COMPANY, THE;A-S SALEM INC., A CORP. OF DE (MERGED INTO);REEL/FRAME:004372/0349
Effective date: 19841226
Jul 5, 1985ASAssignment
Owner name: A-S CAPITAL INC., A CORP OF DE
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNOR:TRANE COMPANY THE A WI CORP;REEL/FRAME:004432/0765
Effective date: 19840224
Jun 1, 1987FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 4
Jun 28, 1988ASAssignment
Owner name: BANKERS TRUST COMPANY
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:AMERICAN STANDARD INC., A DE. CORP.,;REEL/FRAME:004905/0035
Effective date: 19880624
Owner name: BANKERS TRUST COMPANY, 4 ALBANY STREET, 9TH FLOOR,
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:TRANE AIR CONDITIONING COMPANY, A DE CORP.;REEL/FRAME:004905/0213
Effective date: 19880624
Owner name: BANKERS TRUST COMPANY, NEW YORK
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:TRANE AIR CONDITIONING COMPANY, A DE CORP.;REEL/FRAME:004905/0213
Effective date: 19880624
Jun 7, 1991FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 8
Jun 2, 1993ASAssignment
Owner name: CHEMICAL BANK, AS COLLATERAL AGENT, NEW YORK
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:BANKERS TRUST COMPANY, AS COLLATERAL TRUSTEE;REEL/FRAME:006565/0753
Effective date: 19930601
Owner name: CHEMICAL BANK, AS COLLATERAL AGENT, NEW YORK
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:AMERICAN STANDARD INC.;REEL/FRAME:006566/0170
Effective date: 19930601
Jul 3, 1995FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 12
Nov 13, 1997ASAssignment
Owner name: AMERICAN STANDARD, INC., NEW JERSEY
Free format text: RELEASE OF SECURITY INTEREST (RE-RECORD TO CORRECT DUPLICATES SUBMITTED BY CUSTOMER. THE NEW SCHEDULE CHANGES THE TOTAL NUMBER OF PROPERTY NUMBERS INVOLVED FROM 1133 TO 794. THIS RELEASE OF SECURITY INTEREST WAS PREVIOUSLY RECORDED AT REEL 8869, FRAME 0001.);ASSIGNOR:CHASE MANHATTAN BANK, THE (FORMERLY KNOWN AS CHEMICAL BANK);REEL/FRAME:009123/0300
Effective date: 19970801
Nov 14, 1997ASAssignment
Owner name: AMERICAN STANDARD, INC., NEW JERSEY
Free format text: RELEASE OF SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:CHASE MANHATTAN BANK, THE (FORMERLY KNOWN AS CHEMICAL BANK);REEL/FRAME:008869/0001
Effective date: 19970801
Jan 29, 2001ASAssignment
Owner name: AMERICAN STANDARD INTERNATIONAL INC., NEW YORK
Free format text: NOTICE OF ASSIGNMENT;ASSIGNOR:AMERICAN STANDARD INC., A CORPORATION OF DELAWARE;REEL/FRAME:011474/0650
Effective date: 20010104