Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS445434 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 27, 1891
Filing dateMay 1, 1889
Publication numberUS 445434 A, US 445434A, US-A-445434, US445434 A, US445434A
InventorsJohn D. Ripson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
eipson
US 445434 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

(No Model.)

J. D. RIPSON. FABRIC FOR COVERING MOLDINGS, &c.

No. 445,434. Patented Jan. 27, 1891.

WIZWE'SSES [MEWT02 Q 647% W a j. Z. a

.21 liorzwya STATES PATENT OFFICE.

JOHN D. RIPSON, OF TORONTO, CANADA, ASSIGNOR TO DONALD CAMPBELL- RIDOUT, TRUSTEE, OF SAME PLACE.

FABRlC FOR COVERING MOLDINGS, 8M3.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 445,434, dated January 27, 1891.

' Application filed May 1, 1889. Serial No. 309,267. (No model.)

T (0% whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, J GEN DANFORD RIPSON, of the city of Toronto, in the county of York, in the Province of Ontario, Canada, have in vented certain new and useful improvements in fabrics adapted to be used as an ornamental covering for moldings and various articles, and in the article covered with the improved fabric, of which the following is a IO specification.

This invention relates to certain new and .useful improvements in fabrics adapted to be used as an ornamental covering for moldings and various articles and in the article [5 covered with the improved fabric.

The novelty resides in the peculiarity of construction and the combinations and arrangements of parts, all as more fully hereinafter described, shown in the drawings, and

then definitely pointed out in the claims.

In the drawings, Figure l is a perspective view of a piece of my improved fabric. Fig. 2 is a section through the line 5c 00 of Fig. 1, on an enlarged scale. Fig. 3 represents a piece of molding covered with my improved fabric. Fig. 4 represents a flat article covcred with my fabric.

Referring now to the details of the drawings by letter, A represents a piece of fabric 0 provided with ribs or hollow ridges ct, formed therein in any suitable way, preferably, however, by such means as those shown and described in my application Serial No. 259,993. This fabric A is united to a flexible backing 5 5 13, preferably by means of a water-proof material, such as gutta-percha or soft rubber. This backing should be plain-that is, not ribbed-so that when it is secured to the under face of the fabric A there will be spaces 40 I) left between the backing and the ribs 0.

A fabric thus formed will be found'very ornamental, and by reason of its flexible backing it is adapted to be used to cover moldings and many other articles, and may be readily 5 bent into any desired shape. The fabric thus formed when secured to moldings should have its edges bent over the rear side of the wood, as shown in Fig. 3, (in which 0 represents a piece of molding or block of wood or other material,) so that when the molding is attached as shown in said figure the raw edges will be hidden from view. Ordinarily the flexible backing is omitted, although it may be used if desired.

I am aware that picture frame molding has been formed of a wooden base provided with a recess, and an embossed fabric hav-' ing a backing fitting the elevations in the embossed fabric secured to said base. I am also aware that a base of wood has also been 50 formed with corrugations or ribs and a covering of fabric closely united to and follow ing all the irregularities in the surface of the wood, and donot seek to cover such con structions.

I deem it important that the backing be secured flat upon the rear face of the ribbed fabric, not following the depressions therein. The backing thus serves to hold the ribs of the fabric always in their normal position and allows it to be readily bent to accommodate itself to the shape of the place in which it is to be used, whereas where the backing follows and is fitted in the depressions in the fabric there is a double thickness at such points, rendering the material hard to shape and making it clumsy-looking and. bunchy at the ends.

hat I claim as new is 1. As an improved article of manufacture, a fabric having hollow ridges above the body of the cloth united to a plain flexible backing adapted to be used as an ornamental covering for moldings, substantially as described.

2. As an improved article of manufacture, a fabric having hollow ridges united to a plain flexible backing bya water-proof material, substantially as described.

3. In combination with a piece of Wood or other hard material, a covering of fabric secured thereto, provided with hollow ribs raised above the surface of the adjoining portion of the cloth or fabric adhering to the wood, substantially as described.

4. In combination with a piece of wood or other hard material, a covering of fabric secured thereto, provided with hollow ribs raised above the surface of the adjoining portion of the cloth or fabric adhering to the wood with its edges bent under the wood, so that when attached the edges will be hidden, substantially as described.

"Toronto, April 8, 1889.

JOHN D. RIPSON.

In presence of-- CHARLES C. BALDWIN, W. G. MoMrLLAN;

Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationE04F13/0864, E06B3/7001