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Publication numberUS4455873 A
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 06/327,455
Publication dateJun 26, 1984
Filing dateDec 4, 1981
Priority dateDec 4, 1981
Fee statusLapsed
Publication number06327455, 327455, US 4455873 A, US 4455873A, US-A-4455873, US4455873 A, US4455873A
InventorsLeigh R. Abts
Original AssigneeMicro Pure Systems, Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ultrasonic probe
US 4455873 A
Abstract
A probe for obtaining information about a fluid comprising an electrically-shielded transducer having a lens for focusing energy waves, the transducer being attached to a cable and mounted in a protective sheath supported by a rod, whereby the transducer can be immersed in the fluid and moved around therein to take readings at various locations.
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Claims(5)
What is claimed is:
1. A hand-held probe for obtaining information about the kind and number of small particulates in a large volume of fluid standing or slowly circulating in a container comprising:
an ultrasonic transmitter-receiver having a solid concave lens,
said transmitter-receiver being disposed in a protective sheath to shield the transmitter-receiver from the fluid,
said sheath being positioned on the end of a rod whereby said probe can be directed by hand to various locations in the fluid including the corners of the container so that said transmitter-receiver can direct its ultrasonic energy through said concave lens and into the adjacent fluid and thereby detect the presence of the small particulates by detecting the energy reflected from them.
2. The probe of claim 1 wherein said protective sheath comprises a casing for holding said transmitter-receiver.
3. The probe of claim 1 wherein said rod carries a cable, said cable being attached to said transmitter-receiver.
4. The probe of claim 1 wherein said lens directs ultrasonic energy beams through a lens opening in the end of said sheath.
5. A probe for obtaining information about a fluid comprising:
an ultrasonic transmitter-receiver having a lens,
said transmitter-receiver being disposed in a protective sheath,
said sheath being positioned on the end of a rod whereby said probe can be directed to various locations in the fluid,
said probe further comprising a pump mounted on said rod, said pump having an associated conduit through which said pump forces the fluid and across which said conduit said ultrasonic transmitter-receiver is directed.
Description
FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to obtaining information about a fluid.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The background of this invention pertaining to detecting discontinuities in a flowing fluid stream in a narrow conduit is fully set out in my U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,112,773 and 4,214,484, both hereby incorporated by reference.

In addition to obtaining information about fluids flowing in conduits, however, it is also desirable to be able to obtain such information about large volumes of fluids standing in or slowly circulating through large containers.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

I have discovered that an ultrasonic transmitter-receiver having a lens can be sealed in a protective sheath and connected to a cable thereby forming a submersible probe, which probe can be immersed in a fluid and moved around therein to take measurements at various locations.

In a preferred embodiment, an ultrasonic transmitter-receiver having a concave lens and surrounded by an electrically-grounded shield is connected to the end of a cable. The transmitter-receiver is sealed inside a protective sheath, and the cable is encased in a hollow rod so that the transmitter-receiver can be immersed in a fluid and directed to the desired locations for measurements.

In another preferred embodiment, a short conduit having an ultrasonic transmitter-receiver arranged to direct a beam transversely to flow through the conduit is connected to a pump. The conduit and pump are mounted on a rod carrying a cable to the transmitter-receiver. The probe can be placed inside a tank, and when the pump is activated, the fluid will flow through the conduit, and measurements of different portions of the fluid can be taken without moving the probe.

PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

We turn now to the structure and operation of a preferred embodiment, after first briefly describing the drawings.

DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the probe of this invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged cross-sectional view of the protective sheath of the probe of FIG. 1; and

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of another probe of this invention.

STRUCTURE

Referring to FIG. 1, there is shown a probe 10 having a protective sheath 20 mounted on a hollow rod 50.

As shown in FIG. 2, the sheath 20 contains an ultrasonic transmitter-receiver 22 having a concave lens 24 at one end and a twinax Amphanol connector 26 on the opposite end. Transmitter-receiver 22 is the same as that disclosed in my U.S. patent application Ser. No. 187,615, filed Sept. 15, 1980, now U.S. Pat. No. 4,365,515, incorporated herein by reference.

Transmitter-receiver 22 is mounted in a central cavity of a casing 28 and held in place by screws (not shown). Casing 28, the outside of which is screw-threaded, has a flat front face 30 with a lens opening 32 through which transmitter-receiver lens 24 extends. The connector 26 of the transmitter-receiver 22 extends from the other end of the casing 28.

Shielded cable connector 34 is attached to the sheath end of a twinax cable 36. Connector 34 is a standard connector, and it mates with the connector 26 of the transmitter-receiver 22.

Sheath cap 40 fits over casing 28. Cap 40 is generally cylindrical and has a small lens opening 42 in one end. The cap 40 is internally screw-threaded. Casing 28 fits in and is secured inside cap 40, and lens 24 is directed out lens opening 42. Casing 28 is sealed to cap 40 by O-ring seal 44.

The rod 50 covers a portion of the cable 36, and the rod 50 has a cylindrical body 52 attached to its lower end. The body 52 connects to the cap 40, and O-ring seal 54 seals the parts together.

The sheath 20 and the rod 50 are made of TeflonŽ, although the material may change depending upon the type of fluid in which the probe will be used.

The electronic devices to which the cable 36 is attached are the same as those in my U.S. patent application Ser. No. 136,169, filed Mar. 31, 1980, now abandoned, also incorporated herein by reference.

OPERATION

In operation, protective sheath 20 is assembled thereby sealing the transmitter-receiver 22 from the fluid. The transmitter-receiver 22 is operated in the same manner as in my U.S. patent application Ser. No. 136,169, filed Mar. 31, 1980. The operator, however, may hold the rod 50 at the end opposite the sheath 20 and direct a focused ultrasonic beam from the transmitter-receiver 22 into any place in a container of liquid. Therefore, in a large container in which the particulates to be measured may have settled into the corners or to the bottom, the probe 10 can be directed thereto in order to detect them.

OTHER EMBODIMENTS

Referring to FIG. 3, another probe is shown at 70. Probe 70 comprises a conduit 72, a transmitter-receiver 74 of the same type as that of the preferred embodiment, and a pump 80.

The conduit 72 extends about 8 inches in length, and transmitter-receiver 74 is positioned in the side of the conduit 72 near its intake end so as to direct an ultrasonic beam across the flow therethrough. Rod 76 covers a cable 78 from the transmitter-receiver 74.

Pump 80, which is a small diaphragm type, is positioned near the other end of the conduit 72. Air exhaust and air supply pipes 82, 84 are connected to the pump 80.

In operation, the probe 70 is placed in the bottom of a tank, and the pump 80 is activated. Pump 80 continuously forces fluid through the conduit, and transmitter-receiver 74 detects any discontinuities in this flow. Thus, with the pump in operation, the probe 70 can remain in place, while fluid throughout the container will be circulated past the transmitter-receiver 74.

Other embodiments of the invention will occur to those skilled in the art.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3040562 *Feb 27, 1960Jun 26, 1962Chesapeake Instr CorpMethod for determining the constituents of milk and milk products
US3239801 *Dec 18, 1964Mar 8, 1966Automation Ind IncLiquid lens ultrasonic beam controlling device
US3269173 *Mar 2, 1962Aug 30, 1966Transformatoren & RoentgenwerkApparatus for ultrasonic diagnosis
US3310977 *Apr 7, 1964Mar 28, 1967Automatic Ind IncUltrasonic inspection apparatus using variable focus and gate
US3816773 *Oct 12, 1972Jun 11, 1974Mobil Oil CorpMethod and apparatus for detecting particulate material in flow stream
US3898840 *Jan 30, 1974Aug 12, 1975Automation Ind IncMulti-frequency ultrasonic search unit
US3934460 *Aug 6, 1973Jan 27, 1976General Electric CompanyApparatus for focusing and collimating ultrasonic waves
US4297886 *Jun 15, 1979Nov 3, 1981Anikeev Yakov FUltrasonic flaw detector for immersion testing of articles
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4608507 *Jun 29, 1984Aug 26, 1986Micro Pure Systems, Inc.Damping device for focused piezoelectric transducer
US4635042 *Mar 21, 1984Jan 6, 1987Michael EdeVacuum leak detector
US5492014 *Jan 3, 1994Feb 20, 1996J. W. Harley Inc.Ultrasonic transducer for monitoring acoustic emissions
US5747672 *May 2, 1997May 5, 1998Alcan International LimitedUltrasonic probes for use in harsh environments
US8127614 *Apr 3, 2009Mar 6, 2012Microsonic Systems Inc.Methods and systems for ultrasonic coupling using ultrasonic radiation pressure
EP0598667A2 *Oct 27, 1993May 25, 1994Eastman Kodak CompanyEntrained air measurement apparatus and method
WO1995014227A1 *Nov 5, 1994May 26, 1995Lang Apparatebau GmbhMethod and device for determining the useful life of disinfection baths
Classifications
U.S. Classification73/629, 73/632
International ClassificationG01N29/02, G10K11/35, G01N29/032
Cooperative ClassificationG10K11/352, G01N29/032
European ClassificationG01N29/032, G10K11/35B
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Feb 25, 1983ASAssignment
Owner name: MICRO PURE SYSTEMS, INC.; SMITHFIELD, RI. A CORP
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:ABTS, LEIGH R.;REEL/FRAME:004097/0616
Effective date: 19830201
Mar 4, 1983ASAssignment
Owner name: FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF BOSTON, BOSTON, MA.,
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:MICRO PURE SYSTEMS, INC.;REEL/FRAME:004100/0562
Effective date: 19830211
Jun 29, 1987FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 4
Sep 25, 1989ASAssignment
Owner name: MONITEK TECHNOLOGIES, INC., A CORP. OF DE, DELAWAR
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:MICRO PURE SYSTEMS, INC.;REEL/FRAME:005142/0422
Effective date: 19890913
Oct 6, 1989ASAssignment
Owner name: MONITEK TECHNOLOGIES, INC., CALIFORNIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:MICRO PURE SYSTEMS, INC.;REEL/FRAME:005178/0284
Effective date: 19890913
Oct 25, 1991FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 8
Jan 30, 1996REMIMaintenance fee reminder mailed
Jun 23, 1996LAPSLapse for failure to pay maintenance fees
Sep 3, 1996FPExpired due to failure to pay maintenance fee
Effective date: 19960626