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Publication numberUS457294 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 4, 1891
Filing dateMar 19, 1888
Publication numberUS 457294 A, US 457294A, US-A-457294, US457294 A, US457294A
InventorsJames A. Tilden
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fluid-meter
US 457294 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

2 Sheets-Sheet 1.

(No ModeL). J A TILDEN' FLUID METER. No. 457,294. Patented Aug. 4, 1891.

'mzlonma warms ca, womrmo, wAsHmuTun n c MUMPIIIII J II! F (No Model.)

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

JAMES A. TILDEN, OF HYDE PARK, MASSACHUSETTS, ASSIGNOR TO HERSEY METER COMPANY, OF PORTLAND, MAINE.

FLUID-METER.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 457,294, dated August 1, 1891.

. Application filed March 19. 1888. Serial No. 267,703. (No model.) i

To all whom it may concern.-

Be it known that I, JAMES A. TILDEN, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of Hyde Park, in the county of Norfolk and Commonwealth of Massachusetts, have invented a new and useful Improvement in Fluid-Meters, of which the following is a full, clear, and exact description, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, forming a part of this specification, in explaining its nature.

The invention relates to that class of fluidmeters in which there is a movement of the piston in relation to the ring or piece which forms the wall of the piston-chamber; and it relates to various features of organization and construction, all of which will hereinafter be fully described.

In the drawings, Figure 1 is a horizontal section taken through the piston and pistonchamber of one embodiment of the invention; and Fig. 2 is also a horizontal section representing ameter such as that shown in Fig; 1, but when provided with additional ports. Fig. 3 is a vertical section of a meter having the organization shown in Fig. 1. 7

Referring to the drawings, A represents the lower section of the case of the meter, and A the upper section of said case. The upper side of the latter may serve, if desired, as a support for the case holding the register. The section A is cylindrical in shape and holds the rotative ring or piece 0, which is cylindrical upon its exterior and has the pistonchamber 0. D is the rotary piston within the said chamber 0.

The rotative effect of the piston is of course produced by the difference in pressure upon the areas submitted to the action of the direct pressure of the fluid as compared with the pressure upon the discharge areas, and the rotative effect of the ring or piece .0 is also obtained largely from the same cause and partly from the friction of the piston moving upon it; but the piece 0, having a larger area subjected to frictional influence than the piston, is retarded in its movement.

, E is the inlet-passage. D is the exhaust passage.

In Fig. 1 I have shown the piston as triangular in form in horizontal section, having rounded ends and inwardly-curved sides be:

tween the ends, and I have represented the wall forming the piston-chamber as cylindrical upon its exterior and as having a pistonchamber of a shape to permit the rotation of the piston therein for the purpose of dividing it into receiving and discharging sections by the contact of its surface at two or more divergent points with the wall of the chamber.

These contact-points, while constantly vary-.

in g, are always maintained, so that a complete division of the chamber-into two or more sections is always accomplished. This construction also depends for its operation upon the movement of the wall or ring which forms the piston-chamber; but instead of forming the inlet and exhaust port in'the bottom plate or diaphragm of the meter I use a system of side porting, and this is obtained by enlarging the lower section of the case sufficiently to form the chambersF F between the outer surface of the wall and the inner surface of the case. The chambers F F are separated from each other by the inwardly-extending section or projection f of the case. The chamber F is connected with the inlet-passage and the chamber F with the outlet or exhaust passage. The piston wall or ring has framed in it four passages or ports ff f f*, which extend in a straight horizontal line from its outer edge to the piston-chamber and which are arranged to enter the chamber midway the center of the measuring-sections. In operation the piston is caused to rotate in the piston-chamber and the ring to be turned also. This divides the piston-chamber into receiving and discharging spaces, which are alternately brought into communication with the fluid-supply chamber F and the exhaustchamber F, the ring or wall moving to bring each of the ports f f f f consecutively in'to connection With the supply and with the exhaust passages. 1

In Fig. 2 the construction represented is largely like that of Fig. 1, with the exception that the piston has four points instead of three, and the piston-chamber is correspondingly changed, and the piston thereby caused to act to divide the piston-chamber into more than two measuring spaces or recesses, each of which has its independent port for establishing connection at the proper interval with the supply passage and with the ex pistcn-chmnber and the ports, the rotary pis- 1o haust. ton adapted to divide the piston-chamber into Having thus fully described. my invention, progressive measuring spaces or recesses, the I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patsupply-chamber, and the distributing-01mm- 5 ent of the United States i ber substantially as described.

The combination, in a. fluid-meter, 01' the JAMES A. TILDEN. case having the chambers F F and the in- WVitnesses: weirdly-extending section or projection f, the F. F. RAYMOND, 2d, ring contained in said case and having the E. P. SMALL.

Referenced by
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US2428181 *Oct 27, 1944Sep 30, 1947Frank C SibleyRotary gear pump
US2899937 *Apr 13, 1956Aug 18, 1959 Nuebling
US2965039 *Mar 24, 1958Dec 20, 1960Yoshinori MoritaGear pump
US2994277 *Feb 11, 1957Aug 1, 1961Edward Merritt HenryForm and methods of manufacture of rotors for fluid pumps
US3199496 *Jun 22, 1961Aug 10, 1965Gen Motors CorpRotary internal combustion engine
US3242912 *Dec 7, 1961Mar 29, 1966Daimler Benz AgRotary piston engine
US4235217 *Jun 7, 1978Nov 25, 1980Cox Robert WRotary expansion and compression device
US6336317Jul 30, 1999Jan 8, 2002The Texas A&M University SystemQuasi-isothermal Brayton cycle engine
US6530211Aug 16, 2001Mar 11, 2003Mark T. HoltzappleQuasi-isothermal Brayton Cycle engine
US6886326Jan 17, 2003May 3, 2005The Texas A & M University SystemQuasi-isothermal brayton cycle engine
US7093455Feb 2, 2004Aug 22, 2006The Texas A&M University SystemVapor-compression evaporative air conditioning systems and components
US7663283Apr 18, 2006Feb 16, 2010The Texas A & M University SystemElectric machine having a high-torque switched reluctance motor
US7695260Oct 21, 2005Apr 13, 2010The Texas A&M University SystemGerotor apparatus for a quasi-isothermal Brayton cycle engine
US7726959Mar 5, 2007Jun 1, 2010The Texas A&M UniversityGerotor apparatus for a quasi-isothermal Brayton cycle engine
US7819488 *Aug 2, 2007Oct 26, 2010Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.Door opening device and refrigerator having the same
US8753099Dec 23, 2010Jun 17, 2014The Texas A&M University SystemSealing system for gerotor apparatus
US8821138Apr 16, 2010Sep 2, 2014The Texas A&M University SystemGerotor apparatus for a quasi-isothermal Brayton cycle engine
US8905735Mar 29, 2010Dec 9, 2014The Texas A&M University SystemGerotor apparatus for a quasi-isothermal Brayton cycle engine
US8998597 *Sep 21, 2011Apr 7, 2015Yaode YANGCompressor, engine or pump with a piston translating along a circular path
US9382872Dec 5, 2013Jul 5, 2016The Texas A&M University SystemGerotor apparatus for a quasi-isothermal Brayton cycle engine
US20040154328 *Feb 2, 2004Aug 12, 2004Holtzapple Mark T.Vapor-compression evaporative air conditioning systems and components
US20060239849 *Mar 6, 2006Oct 26, 2006Heltzapple Mark TGerotor apparatus for a quasi-isothermal Brayton cycle engine
US20060279155 *Apr 18, 2006Dec 14, 2006The Texas A&M University SystemHigh-Torque Switched Reluctance Motor
US20070237665 *Mar 5, 2007Oct 11, 2007The Texas A&M Univertsity SystemGerotor Apparatus for a Quasi-Isothermal Brayton Cycle Engine
US20080083243 *Aug 2, 2007Apr 10, 2008Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.Door opening device and refrigerator having the same
US20100003152 *Jan 21, 2005Jan 7, 2010The Texas A&M University SystemGerotor apparatus for a quasi-isothermal brayton cycle engine
US20100247360 *Mar 29, 2010Sep 30, 2010The Texas A&M University SystemGerotor Apparatus for a Quasi-Isothermal Brayton Cycle Engine
US20100266435 *Apr 16, 2010Oct 21, 2010The Texas A&M University SystemGerotor Apparatus for a Quasi-Isothermal Brayton Cycle Engine
US20110200476 *Dec 23, 2010Aug 18, 2011Holtzapple Mark TGerotor apparatus for a quasi-isothermal brayton cycle engine
US20120288390 *Sep 21, 2011Nov 15, 2012Yang YaodeCompressor, engine or pump with a piston translating along a circular path
DE1403304B *Feb 13, 1957Oct 16, 1969Concentric Engineering LtdInnenrotor und Aussenrotor einer Zahnradpumpe sowie Bearbeitungsverfahren fuer die Zahnform des Innenrotors und die Innenverzahnung des Aussenrotors
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationF04C2/102