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Publication numberUS457783 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 18, 1891
Filing dateAug 9, 1890
Publication numberUS 457783 A, US 457783A, US-A-457783, US457783 A, US457783A
InventorsFrederick Kohnle
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Marking-tag
US 457783 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

(No Model.)

1. KOHNLE. MARKING TAG.

No. 457,783. Patented Aug. 18, 1891.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

FREDERICK KOHNLE, OF DAYTON, OHIO.

MARKING-TAG...

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 457,783, dated August 18, 1891.

Application filed August 9, 1890.

To all whom it may concern.-

Be it known that I, FREDERICK KOHNLE, a citizen of the United States, residing at Dayton, in the county of Montgomery and State of Ohio, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in lVIarking-Tags, of which the following is a description, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, forming part of this specification.

My invention relates to that class of tags which are designed to be attached to textile fabrics and other similar articles of merchandise and to have written on them the cost and selling prices, numbers, and like xnelnoranda relating to the article to which they are attached.

It'has for its object the production of a tag which may be quickly and securely attached to the fabric and whose attaching devices will be hidden when the tag has been attached, leaving both faces of the tag unmutilated and free to be written upon, or, where the attaching devices are not entirely hidden, yet to leave the surfaces of the tag as nearly clear as may be to aiford the greatest room for the memoranda to be written upon it.

The novelty of my invention will be herein set forth, and specifically pointed out in the claims.

In the accompanying drawings, Figure 1 is an inside perspective view of my improved tag open. Fig. 2 is a sectional side elevation of the same partly closed with the fabric inserted between its flaps. Fig. 3 is a corresponding view showing the tag attached to the fabric. Fig. 4: is an inside perspective view of my tag with aslightly-modified form of attaching devices. Fig. 5 is a corresponding view with still another change in the attaching devices. Fig. 6 is a side elevation of my tag attached to a fabric.

The same letters of reference are used to indicate identical parts in all the figures.

My improved tag is preferably formed of a single strip A, of heavy paper or other suitable material, creased at its middle to form two flaps B B of about equal length. The ends of these flaps are doubled over, as shown in Fig. 1, to re-enforce themand to secure the attaching devices in place. Between the Serial No. 361,578. (No model.)

lapped-over portion 66 of the flap B and the.

body of the flap is inserted a flat piece of metal I), which is held in place by the lap .a, the latter being pasted or otherwise fastened to the body of the flap B. A portion of the flap a immediately over the metal plate I) is cut out, as at c, and the portion of the lap between this cut-out'portion and the end of the tag at (Z is not pasted down, but is left free for a pin on the opposite end of the tag to pass between it and the plate I). The pin 6 is secured to the opposite end of the tag in any suitable manner, in Fig. l by having a flat right angular portion of it confined between the lap at and the body of the flap B, the two being pasted together, as in the case of the lap a and flap B.

In attaching the tag to a fabric the latter is inserted between the flaps B B and pressed down over the pin (2. When the ends of the tag are then brought together, as shown in Fig. 2, the point of the pin will strike the metal plate b, and upon firmly squeezing the ends of the tag together the pin will be bent over by the metal plate and its point will pass under the portion d of the lap at and be confined between the lap and the plate, as shown in Fig. 3. In this manner the tag can be very quickly attached to the fabric, all that is necessary being to place the edge of the fabric betweenthe ends of the tag and squeeze the latter together. The tagis securely fastened to the fabric, and the attaching devices are entirely hidden, so that both sides of the tag are left clear to be written upon. This enables smaller tags to be employed than would be necessary if a portion of the marking-surface of the tag were taken up by the attaching devices, as is usual.

iVhile the above is my preferred construction and most completely embodies the advantages of my invention, yet I do not wish to be limited to such precise construction, for my invention contemplates, broadly, atag having the two flaps, one of which is provided at its end with the attaching-pin and the other of which is provided on its inner side with a corresponding receptacle which receives and confines the pin when thetwo ends of the tag are pressed together, as described. 100' 'middle to form a receptacle for the pin e.

As the metal plate is not employed in this construction, more care has to be exercised in attaching the tag to the fabric to prevent the pin passing directly through the flap B when the ends of the tag are pressed together instead of being bent to enter the opening between the lap at and the flap B at f. By

- bending the ends of the tag slightly outward from the fabric just as they are pressed together the pin will be directed into the opening and bent down as desired.

In Fig. 5 I have shown a staple g clinched in the end of the flap B as the receptacle for the pin e, the tag being attached to the fabric in the same manner as the one shown in Fig. 4. In this tag the ends of the staple appear on one side of the tag when the latter is fastened on the fabric, so that both sides of the tag are not left entirely clear, as I prefer.

Even when the metal plate 1) is employed, as in Fig. 1, the exact shape and relative lo cation of it may be varied. The cut-out portion 0 of the lap a might be dispensed with if the lap were made shorter and the metal plate projected some distance from beneath its edge; or the metal plate might be secured to the flap B otherwise than by the lap a and any suitable receptacle for the pin be provided.

I have before stated that the pin 6 may be se cured to the end of the flap Bin any suitable manner. As I have shown it secured between the flap and the lap a, it is entirely hidden when the tag is attached to the fabric, so that the outside of this flap of the tag is left clear, even when a staple is used in the opposite flap, as in Fig. 5; but where it is not objectionable to have the pin project through the end of the tag it maybe clinched in place through the end of the flap B and the lap a be dispensed with. If this were done in the tag shown in Figs. 1 and 4, one side of the tag would still be left perfectly clear when attached to the fabric and its opposite side would have merely the end of the pin projecting through it. Where the laps a a or either of them are employed, however, they may consist of separate pieces pasted to the flaps B B instead of being the bent-over ends of the latter, though the construction I have shown is preferable. Again, while it is decidedly preferable that the body of the tag be formed of a single strip of material creased at its center, yet my invention in its broader scope may not be evaded by forming the body of the tag of two separate pieces secured together at one end. The latter construction may even be desirable when the tag is made of heavy cardboard, in which case the flaps may be flexibly secured together at one end by a strip of muslin or like material.

I am aware that it has heretofore been proposed to provide a marking-tag composed of two flaps with an attaching-pin by which it might be fastened to the fabric and the pin hidden from view, leaving both sides of the tag unmutilated; but in the tags of this description with which I am familiar the pin simply hooks the tag to the fabric and one end of the tag is left entirely free, so that the tag is insecurely fasten ed to the fabric. In my improved tag both ends are securely fastened to the fabric, so that there is no danger of the tag becoming accidentally detached.

Having thus fully described my invention, I claim v 1. The herein-described marking-tag,composed of the two flaps B B, the latter provided with the pin 9 and the former having a smooth exterior surface and provided inside of or beneath its inner surface with a receptacle in which the pin is confined and hidden when the ends of the tag are pressed together, substantially as and for the purpose described.

2. The herein-described marking-tag, composed of the flaps B B, having the laps a a, the flap B having the pin 6 secured between it and its lap a and the flap B having a receptacle between it and its flap a, in which the pin 6 is confined when the ends of the tag are pressed together, substantially as and for the purpose described.

3. The herein-described marking-tag,composed of the flap B, provided with a pin .8, and the flap B, having inside of its inner face a receptacle for said pin and having also on its inner face a metal plate I) for bending said pin and directing it into said receptacle when the ends of the tag are pressed together, substantially as set forth.

4. The herein-described marking-tag, composed of the flaps B B, the latter provided with the pin e and the former with the lap at and the metal plate I), said plate being located in the inner or under side of said flap B and adapted to bend the pin e and direct it beneath the lap a when the ends of the tag are pressed together, substantially as and for the purpose described.

5. The herein-described marking-tag, composed of the flaps B B, the latter provided with the pin 6 and the former with the lap a, having the cut-out portion at c and the metal plate beneath the latter, said plate being located on the inner or under side of said flap B and adapted to bend the pin e and direct it beneath thelap a when the ends of the tag are pressed together, substantially as and for the purpose described.

6. The herein-described marking-tag, composed of the flaps B B, forined of a single are pressed together, substantially as and for the purpose described.

FREDERICK KOHNLE.

Witnesses:

EDWARD REOTOR, J. THOMSON CRoss.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2542128 *Dec 29, 1948Feb 20, 1951Fleischer Mills IncTag fastener
US4241477 *Aug 16, 1979Dec 30, 1980John FreedomPaper clip
US5125758 *Dec 6, 1990Jun 30, 1992Dewan Thomas EPiercing clamp
US8234759Aug 7, 2012Staples The Office Superstore, LlcDevice for releasably securing to a support surface
US20100107373 *Nov 4, 2008May 6, 2010Staples The Office Superstore, LlcDevice for releasably securing to a support surface
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationG09F3/12