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Publication numberUS462324 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 3, 1891
Publication numberUS 462324 A, US 462324A, US-A-462324, US462324 A, US462324A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Window-awning
US 462324 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

(No Model.) 2 Sheets-Sheet 1.

W. H. NEWTON.

WINDOW AWNING.

No. 462,324. Patented NOV. 3, 1891.

My JW m 1 javewio r (No Model.) 2 Sheets-Sheet 2.

W. H. NEWTON. WINDOW AWNING.

No. 462,324. Patented Nov. 3, 1891.

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j J 3 3 fill! a 5 [um I Il|IlFHlllIll|iV////////////////////////[/////////////////% llIlHllllll lll IIIIIIII ImuI I lulu a e b 2 I" I 1" II NTTED STATES PATENT OEEIcE.

\VILTQIAM H. NEWTON, OF CARTVRIGHT, PENNSYLVANIA.

WINDOW-AWNING.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 462,324, dated November 3, 1891.

Application filed October 10, 1890' Serial No. 367,709- (No model.)

1'0 ctZZ whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, WILLIAM H. NEWTON, a citizen of the United States, residing at Cartwright, in the county of Elk and State of Pennsylvania, have invented a new and useful Improvement in \Vindow-Awnings, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to that class of awnings which are used for shading windows and which are capable of being closed like an umbrella.

My invention has the objects to produce a light, firm, and convenient awning of this kind which shall be simple and cheap in construction and which is free from parts which obstruct the space in front of the window below the awning.

In the accompanying drawings, consisting of two sheets, Figure 1 is a vertical section of my improved awning applied to a window, showing the awning open or projected. Fig. 2 is a similar view showing the same closed. Fig. 3 is a horizontal section thereof. Fig. at is a horizontal section on an enlarged scale,

showing the means for steadying the upright.

guide of the awning. Fig. 5 is a vertical cross-section, on an enlarged scale, of the bracket which supports the awning. Fig. 6 is abottom plan view thereof. Fig. 7is a vertical longitudinal section of the bracket. Fi g. y

8 is a sectional front elevation of the awning, showing the flaps which cover the upper corners of the window.

Like letters of reference refer to like parts in the several figures.

A represents the wall of a building, and B is a bracket secured to the building above the window and supporting the parts of the awnmg.

0 represents folding ribs or arms pivoted at their upper ends between lugs or ears formed on the bracket B, and D is the cloth covering applied to thearms. The lugs to which these arms are pivoted are arranged in a semicircle, so that the arms when projected diverge downwardly and outwardly and form a semicircular frame extending across the upper portion of the window.

E is 2. depending guide or frame secured at its upper end to the bracket B and terminating at or near the bottom of the awning. The

bracket B preferably consists ofan upright base-plate Z), which is secured to the face of the building, and a horizontal plate or flange 1), having ears to which the folding arms are pivoted. The guide E is composed of two parallel rods, which are screw -threaded at their upper portions and pass with their threaded portions through perforated horizontal lugs 11 formed at the lower end of the base-plate, and through openings formed in the horizontal plate Z), the rods being secured to the bracket by nuts b applied to the threaded portions of the rods and bearing, respectively, against the horizontal plate and the lugs of the base-plate, as clearly represented in Figs. 5 and 6. This construction permits the awning to be readily removed from the building by simply removing the nuts of the guide-rods and to be readily replaced without requiring the removal of the base-plate of the bracket.

F represents a slide or runner arranged upon the parallel rods of the guide E, and G are arms or stretchers pivoted at their inner ends to the runner and at their outer ends to the lower portions of the arms or ribs 0., so that upon raisingthe runner on the guide the ribs are closed or folded inwardly, as represented in Fig. 2, while upon lowering the run ner they are projected or opened, as represented in Figs. 1 and 11 represents a cross-bar secured at its ends to the window-frame and provided with a central loop h, which embraces the lower portion of the guide E, so as to steady the guide at this point and prevent the runner from being pushed against the window when the awning is exposed to a strong wind.

By constructing the guide E of parallel rods, as shown, the runner is held against twisting on the guide, thereby preventing the pivots of the folding arms and stretchers from being bent or broken.

i represents an elevating-cord, whereby the runner is raised to fold the awning. This cord is attached at one end to the runner, and passes thence upwardly over a guide-roller j, j ournaled in the under side of the bracket B, the free end of the cord terminating within easy reach. The end of the cord attached to the runner preferably passes through an opening in the runner and depends below the same, so that the runner may be lowered by the cord to open the awning.

By suspending the guide of the runner from the top of the window the use of the usual upright rods or posts rising from the base of the window is avoided, leaving the space in front of the window under the awning clear and unobstructed and rendering the awning cheaper in construction and more sightly in appearance.

Owing to the upwardly-tapering form of the awning, the upper corners of the window are not covered, unless the awningis arranged at-a sufficient height for this purpose. To properly cover these corners I prefer to employ flaps k, which are attached at their inner wide edges to the innermost ribs of the awning opposite the upper corners of the window and at their outer free ends to cords Z. These cords run over guide-pulleys Z, arranged at the corners of the window-frame and are attached at their lower ends to the runner F, so that upon lowering the runner to open the awning the cordsl are drawn taut, causing the outer ends of the flaps to be raised and covering the corners of the window.

I am aware that folding awnings have been provided with an upright post for the runner, which post extended from the windowsill to the lintel, as shown, forinstance, in the patent to J. Sands, No. 258,132, dated May 16, 1882. Such a construction is objectionable, because the guide-post partly obstructs the View below the awnin and is unsightly. In my improved construction the guide of the runner terminates near the bottom of the awningfthus leaving the space in front of the win= dow below the awning wholly unobstructed.

I claim as my invention 1. The combination, with a bracket secured to the building above the window, of folding arms or ribs pivoted at their upper ends to said brackets, an upright guide depending from said bracket and terminating near the bottom of the awning, a cross-bar arranged in front of the window, whereby the lower portion of the guide is held against inward movement, a runner sliding upon said guide independently of said cross-bar, stretchers connecting the lower portions of said arms with the runner, and a flexible covering applied to said folding arms, substantially as set forth.

2. The combination, with a bracket secured to the building above the window, of folding arms or ribs pivoted at their upper ends to said bracket, an upright guide depending from said bracket and terminating near the bottom of the awning, and a cross-bar arranged in front of the window and having a loop which embraces the free end of the guide independently of said cross-bar, a runner sliding upon said guide, stretchers connecting the lower portions of said arms with the runner, and a flexible covering applied to said arms, substantially as set forth.

3. In an awning, the combination, with a vertical base-plate secured to'the building above the window and provided with a perlug of the base-plate, clamping-nuts applied to said rod to hold it to its place and the horizontal plate to the lug, a runner arranged upon said guide, arms pivoted at their upper ends to said horizontal plate, and stretchers connecting the arms with the runner, substantially as set forth.

4:. The combination, with the supportingbracket, of the upright guide suspended from said bracket and composed of two rods connected together at their lower ends, folding 8 arms or ribs pivoted at their upper ends to said bracket, a runner sliding upon both rods of said guide, stretchers connecting the lower portions of said arms with the runner, and a flexible awning applied to said arms, suboo stantially as set forth.

5. In a conical or upwardly-tapering awning, the combination, with the supportingbracket and the folding arms or ribs pivoted thereto, of an upright guide, a runner sliding 5 upon said guide and connected with said folding arms, and flaps covering the exposed upper corners of the window and attached at their inner portions to the adjacent folding arms of the awning, substantially as set forth. too

6. In a conical or upwardly-tapering awn ing, the combination, with the supportingbracket and the folding arms or ribs pivoted thereto, of an upright guide, a runner sliding upon said guide and connected with said folding arms, flaps covering the exposed upper corners of the window and attached to the adjacent folding arms of the awning, and cords connecting the free ends of said flaps with the runner and passing over suitable 11c guides, substantially as set forth.

Witness my hand this 1st day of October, 1890.

WM. II. NElVTON.

Witnesses:

CARL F. GEYER, FRED. O. GEYER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3015358 *Jan 20, 1958Jan 2, 1962Serena KennedyCollapsible outside window shading device
US4768317 *Nov 4, 1985Sep 6, 1988Markham Gaynor PUltra-lite stationary awning structures
US6640868 *Aug 15, 2000Nov 4, 2003Urs GuggisbergWeather protection device comprising at least one foldable protective elements
US6729076 *Dec 15, 1999May 4, 2004Kenneth Ronald GaleSupport structure for an awning or the like
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationE04F10/04